YouTube: HMS Bulwark - Aviation

Discussion in 'The Fleet Air Arm' started by soleil, Dec 15, 2012.

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  2. Counting the lashing!!! That's a new one to me :angel8: imagine 16 chain storm lashings per aircraft to tot up :lol:
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2012
  3. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    Back in the day ... Gosh thanks Waspie. Like coming home!

    HMS London got a brief mention - Seaweed wuz there.
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  4. Can't remember when it started Scouse, sometime in the 70's early 80's I think.

    It was SOP on 829 (Wasp's). Left the disc and hand with lashings were raised to indicate to pilot that ALL lashings removed.

    IIRC, it wasn't long after a Wx3 ditching off a DLG when the rear port chain lashing wasn't removed and there was a fatality. Wessex took off and pivoted about the lashing, flipped on it's back and went over the side.

    I was on course at PO at the time and the class was cancelled as we had 2 x SAR divers who were needed to assist with the search and recovery! I believe the pilot was a 'Van' somebody! Forget his full surname!!!
  5. 13/12/1976 XM844 V-404 Wessex HAS3 737 NAS While off the Isles of Scilly a night take was attempted from HMS Devonshire with the tail section still lashed to the ship. This ripped off the tail wheel causing the tail rotor to strike the Sea Slug missile launcher. It then fell over the starboard side of the ship and sank. One crew member was killed. VAN SOMEREN, Richard S, Lieutenant Commander, C0155772H, died
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2012
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  6. That's the one Scouse.
  7. Far be it from me to state the 'Bleedin obvious' but we probably wouldn't be flying if 16 chain storm lashings were req'd! I think we usually put on 2 per side nylon lashings on the main u/c points and 1 apiece either side of the tailwheel, which was a bit more manageable for the 'Captain of the Aircraft' to wave around?

    Dare I venture to suggest that the video irrevocably shows that there was a Wessex Mk1 'Commando' version. I have been told and very forcibly on occasion, that no such a/c ever existed, which was a bit off putting, having spent 18 months in the Far East flying in the things with 845 Sqdn in an undeclared war.

    Broke the 'Science Fiction' out of the termite, bomb, flood and fireproof Samsonite briefcase and discovered that we pursued 'Indon' (only the media called them 'Indos':- they make up their own news:- see Leveson enquiry!) Officer and SNCO Para Pathfinders airdropped from a C130 around the Southern Malay Peninsula on 11 Sep 1964, which was before 'Dark Night'.

    I thought it was in the Mersing area, turns out to be further North on the Eastern Malaya Coast near Marang, Kuala Terenggangu (Sp) area.

    I kicked off as Junglie Crewman with Lt Cdr 'Tank' Sherman and Lt C Morgan in XP 113 'H' at 0935 with a troop lift to The Marang area, having climbed out of XP 142 'Juliet' (Yeah I know, she's now a MK3 as 'Humphrey and I visit the old bird in the FAA Museum at times). (She'd already been through an undeclared war before the Falklands!) as a SAR Diver for a f/w free take off launch, of an RAF Single Pioneer on 16 Oct 1964. Then on 20 Oct 1964 at 0600 in XP 103 'W' with Lt John Foster, then SLt Jones. Later same day with Lt 'Jimmy' James in XP 138 'M' for most of the day, troops etc. Then at 1415 on 21 Oct in XP 138 'M' with Lt Derek Scott, as seen in the movie! later same day with SLt Tony Horton in XP 114 'K'. Spent all day as SAR Diver on 22 Oct '64 with Lt Faulks after 0825 SAR Check in Whirlwind Mk7 XG 591: Great! 23 Oct with SLt Mimpriss (on loan from 814 Sqdn 'Victorious') in XP 108 'E' with Captain (Morgan) of Bulwark to 'Blue2'. Last effort of the exercise on 26 Oct 1954 at 1620 with Lt Neil Burns-Thomson in Whirlwind Mk7 XN 309 with Producer and Camerman, Filming For Cdo Ship Documentary. We 'Acquired' a couple of probably ex 846 Sqdn Whirlwinds from RNAS Simbang to supplement the Wessex Mk1's we seemed to quite often prang, plus they were often grounded with the famous Napier Gazelle Engine problems. Have to watch it all again myself with the list of callsigns and poss see myself with hair and without glasses or 'power bulge! Hope that satisfies the historic 'Planespotters' amongst our readers. I haven't managed to buy the late Ray Sturtivant's excellent book on FAA helicopters yet.

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