Yes, Minister

#2
Vauxhall said: "Well It is not difficult to see what is going on here. It is all in the word “existing” – a word which was not in the question at all but crept into the answer. In the Society we already know that the pension arrangements for those already serving are unlikely to change – the big question is what is being planned for those who are yet to join."

OK. But a slightly bigger question is what might be being planned for those no longer serving.....?
 

vauxhall

Lantern Swinger
#4
Vauxhall said: "Well It is not difficult to see what is going on here. It is all in the word “existing” – a word which was not in the question at all but crept into the answer. In the Society we already know that the pension arrangements for those already serving are unlikely to change – the big question is what is being planned for those who are yet to join."

OK. But a slightly bigger question is what might be being planned for those no longer serving.....?

Oh - I can help you here..... Your pension is based on the pension scheme rules in situ at the date of your discharge. For example, in 2006 the preserved pension age changed from 60 to 65 - that was only for people in service on or after 6 April 2006. The only exception I can think of is the change to widow(er)s' pensions in 2015 which meant the spouse/civil partner pensions awarded from that date were for life.

If you know anyone who had their pension stopped because of remarriage or cohabitation, who has since become single, do remind them that they can apply to have their pension reinistated.
 

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