WW11 Admiralty Dispatch Case Lettering

#1
Does anyone know the meaning of the following Initials seen in gold on a WW11 Admiralty dispatch case please?Going mad rapidly with finding various 'solutions'.... :frustrated:

'A/S. W.D. & A.U.D.'

Admiralty Signals? Admiralty Service? Asisstant Secretary?

War Department?

Autonomous Underwater Devices??

Admiralty Undersea Defence???

The Case has a large gold No '2' on top and also on the sides of the lid. In the centre of the lid was 'GR' and Kings crown above - for King George V1th.

Be very grateful for serious :threaten: interpretations please! Thank you :thanks:
 
#2
Eaglet said:
Does anyone know the meaning of the following Initials seen in gold on a WW11 Admiralty dispatch case please?Going mad rapidly with finding various 'solutions'.... :frustrated:

'A/S. W.D. & A.U.D.'

Admiralty Signals? Admiralty Service? Asisstant Secretary?

War Department?

Autonomous Underwater Devices??

Admiralty Undersea Defence???

The Case has a large gold No '2' on top and also on the sides of the lid. In the centre of the lid was 'GR' and Kings crown above - for King George V1th.

Be very grateful for serious :threaten: interpretations please! Thank you :thanks:

As a guess -------A/S is normally Anti submarine
A/S WD Anti Submarine Weapons Discharge
and A.U.D Admiralty Underwater Detection

Anti submarine warfare was a very big thing in WW2 . Finding and destroying Uboats with various 'weapons ' kept a lot of people busy .

They are still at it now --- perfecting various systems

There used to be an establishment in Portsmouth called ASWE
Anti submarines weapons establishment ----the case could be a relic from its past history[and HMS Vernon ].


:nemo: :nemo:
 
#3
'ASWE on the Hill' as it was known - it's now derelict and known as 'ASWE as was' - was the Admiralty Surface Weapons Establishment on Portsdown Hill to the north of Portsmouth. Anti-submarine weapons and sensors were developed at AUWE (Admiralty Underwater Weapons Establishment) at Southwell on Portland.

My guess is that 'A/S. W.D. & A.U.D' stands for 'Anti-Submarine Warfare Division & Admiralty Underwater Detection'. From pp. 240/1 of 'Seek and Strike - Sonar, Anti-Submarine Warfare and the Royal Navy 1914-1954' (1984) by Willem Hackmann:

In April 1939 A/S warfare was given more prominence with the formation of the Local Defence Division, consisting of three sections: local defence, minesweeping and A/S warfare. These became separate divisions within the Admiralty in October of that year. The Captain A/S Warfare Division continued for a few months to be responsible to the Director of the A/S Warfare Division (DA/SW) for the training and drafting of personnel, for asdic research and development, and for the ship-fitting of this equipment; but with the organisation of HMS Osprey in the summer of 1940, the post of Captain A/S lapsed.
From p. 330 of the same book:

The return to Portland and expansion of the RNSS

The main wartime asdic laboratory, HMA/SEE Fairlie, was closed down and the staff returned to Portland on 28 February 1941. The journey by special train took eighteen hours. Seven coaches and four vans carried 131 passengers, including wives and families, together with their goods and chattels (including dogs, cats, prams, bicycles and personal luggage), as well as the Establishment's confidential papers. For many it was a joyous occasion; after five wars in Scotland, they were returning to familiar haunts. The first sight to greet them when they reported for duty was the charred shell of the office block blitzed in July 1940. The laboratories were gaunt and unwelcoming, and the additional staff recruited at Fairlie had to overflow into temporary huts. A few months later they were joined by the ex-DA/SM staff (involved in the wartime manufacture of asdic sets) from Bath. Conditions were now restored to pre-war days, with research and production housed in the same establishment. The completion of this reorganization in 1947 was marked by changing the wartime name to HM Underwater Detection Establishment (HMUDE) Portland [Appendix 1].
 
#5
Many thanks indeed to you for coming back to fast with a solution to my question - I am very grateful to you. Haven't smiled so much for a very long time!

I found the case in covered in - well, you've guessed it! - and feathers in an old hen house in Fareham - well placed to have once been the part-time smallholding to an ex-RN officer. I will look into it further and see who, if anyone, I come up with and post my findings.

If the custom still prevailed - you could have my tot for a month!
 
#6
My grateful thanks to you for coming back with all the information I need so quickly and for the quote which I shall certainly follow up.

The case came from an old hen house in Fareham, which seems well placed for one of the establishments concerned. well - Fareham, that is - not the hen house..

Thank you once again for your time and knowledge, I'll be posting anything else I (hopefully) come up with.
 
#7



It did not belong to that S/Lt who was done for selling secrets to support his wifes needs. What was it, back in the 70s. He worked at ASWE Southwell, and some documents did go missing. He lived in that area I believe.

Open the case with caution, :eek: :eek:

Regards, Chris

 
#8
FLAGHOIST said:
It did not belong to that S/Lt who was done for selling secrets to support his wifes needs. What was it, back in the 70s. He worked at ASWE Southwell, and some documents did go missing. He lived in that area I believe.

Open the case with caution, :eek: :eek:

Regards, Chris

Ah, yes. You mean the infamous David Bingham of HMS Rothesay and his grasping wife Maureen (link)
 
#9



The very man, the very man. I remember him well. He got around 20 - 25 years, I wonder what he is doing now. Not a lot I suppose. His wife got done as well I believe, sometime afterwards, a shock to the system for her. His death was not reported openly in the media. Such a waste of a career and a life.

I can remember there being some talk of him working in Bournemouth (my home town), but nothing was ever realised.

Regards, Chris

 
#10
eek! just my Bl**dy luck...

I imagine though, spies like Bingham and his Missus would use a slightly less obvious holder for their information - wrapped in a copy of the Navy News from the 1970's perhaps..??

I hope not though - desecration indeed of a fine upstandin' publication... ;))

May eventually donate the case to the RN Museum. Never to be seen again...

'The US and British Navy were recently on manoeuvres in the Persian gulf. The communications officer on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise sent a radio message to the British carrier HMS Illustrious - " And how's the 2nd biggest Navy in the world today then??"
To which the Illustrious officer responded - " Fine. How's the 2nd best ??'


Classic
 
#11
Eaglet said:
eek! just my Bl**dy luck...

I imagine though, spies like Bingham and his Missus would use a slightly less obvious holder for their information - wrapped in a copy of the Navy News from the 1970's perhaps..??

I hope not though - desecration indeed of a fine upstandin' publication... ;))

May eventually donate the case to the RN Museum. Never to be seen again...

'The US and British Navy were recently on manoeuvres in the Persian gulf. The communications officer on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise sent a radio message to the British carrier HMS Illustrious - " And how's the 2nd biggest Navy in the world today then??"
To which the Illustrious officer responded - " Fine. How's the 2nd best ??'

Classic
That dit is older than me , just change the names :thumright:
 

jambosun

Lantern Swinger
#12
Eaglet said:
May eventually donate the case to the RN Museum. Never to be seen again...

quote]

Eaglet, If you do decide to get rid of it, and presuming it's in ok ish condition you could always see if the Antiques Storehouse in the Dockyard would be interested. At least then you could get some money for it.
 
#13
The dit may be older than you Stirling - but as an RN Sprog I'm not.. so its new to me.

Jambosun, (love that name) thanks for the info on the Antiques Storehouse in the Dockyard, very useful to know. I may keep hold of it for the sake of its interesting history and my own interest of the RN. (Thanks Dad - look what you've done to me!)

Another old chestnut for you ;))

'There were gentlemen and there were seamen in the navy of Charles the Second. But the seamen were not gentlemen; and the gentlemen were not seamen'.
 

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