Who is this RN Officer?

Discussion in 'History' started by massadaddy, Sep 5, 2010.

Welcome to the Navy Net aka Rum Ration

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial RN website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Is there a prize?, we only work for incentives. :D
  2. It could only be worsley if it was one of shackleton's mob, because of the rank. But I can't really tell from the other pics available.
    In most pics they all sport full sets so ?????

  3. And you spent how many hours finding this out?

    You need to understand that in life, if your not shaggin, suppin or sleepin, your wasting your time. :D :wink: :wink:
    I'm multitasking as I type. :wink: :oops:
  4. Rumrat - I presumed he was your Sea-Dad and you were just setting us a quiz.
  5. witsend

    witsend War Hero Book Reviewer

    Nice interesting find mate.
  6. How many hours? Rumrat, my dear fellow, it took only a matter of minutes to identify the Commander. Thanks to massadaddy mentioning the Shackleton expeditions, and for posting such a good quality photo I was able to identify his rank and some of his medals - the first medal being the OBE, that enabled me to identify him.

    Quote, alfred_the_great: Rumrat - I presumed he was your Sea-Dad and you were just setting us a quiz.

    Alfred, we all know that the Sea-Dad of Rumrat was in fact Jack Punch (Capt. John Perkins). 8O

    massadaddy: You have some great pictures there, thanks for sharing them with us. The chap in the photo does look like George Hubert Wilkins, although I am no expert. Might I suggest that you join the Cool Antarctica Forum, as I am sure the members on there would be most interested in your photographs.

    LINK: http://www.coolantarctica.com/Antar...st Shackleton_Trans-Antarctic_expedition3.htm

    A slight aside, but of interest:-

    In Shackleton's footsteps.
    Following the Falklands War, British troops were stationed on South Georgia. In 1985, 70 years after Shackleton's crossing, Captain Roger Morgan-Grenville got permission to take 11 men on a training exercise from King Haaken Bay to Stromness Bay. All were young and fit, wearing four layers of clothing under outer waterproofs and equipped for the climb with crampons and abseil ropes. They covered 28 miles in 32 hours, a great achievement but one which makes Shackleton’s all the more outstanding.

  7. Thanks a million sweetpea. Wilco tomorrow.
  8. witsend

    witsend War Hero Book Reviewer


    Where did you acquire them?
  9. witsend

    witsend War Hero Book Reviewer


    Whatever the story is, please post more of those pics.
  10. Watching the recent(ish) Kenneth Branagh docu-drama of Shako's little trip caused me to reseaarch it for myself: the terms 'jaw-dropping' and 'awe inspiring' areused to frequently and their meaning tends to be watered down some, but what Shakleton did to save his mission ... I am lost for words.

    I'm astounded at what they/he accomplished. That it ended so well, when they faced such odds ... speechless.

Share This Page