Who else used this?

#3
janner said:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110519795505&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:GB:1123

Just the pic brings back a few memories

:cry: :cry: :cry:

But what about the ..........

Never mind......... No one else does.

Edited to add:

"Come shallower - We are losing the signal."
 
#7
I used the B40 on the Ghurka when it was dragged out of mothballs in 82. It proved to be a very useful piece of kit for us as everything was knackered including the crew!
 
#8
This brings back fond memories of the ship disappearing from the airwaves for 48 hours at a time or managing to make contact with the Comcen Whitehall via Gibraltar or even Mauritius while off Lands End. Click here to see the B41 in a familiar setting then look at the background information here:

RATT at sea in the Royal Navy
RN Museum of radar and communications said:
...When RATT was first introduced, the stresses and strains manifest in a telegraphists duty were not immediately lifted because the navy ran RATT and Morse together, side by side, as a 'belts-and-braces' approach just in case the 'machine - RATT equipment' failed to live up to expectations. When things were working well, the traffic flow increased because of the speed of operating with the teletypewriters {? but see below} - just like the JCB got through more work. In actual fact, the speed more than doubled [Fleet speed on Morse Broadcast was often 25wpm = 18.75 Bauds] and the new Fleet RATT was set at 45 Bauds [later increasing to 50 and/or 75 bauds] = 66.6 and/or 100 wpm. Add to this the convenience of having a teletypewriter copy of the signal rather than a hand scribed copy and the effect of speed was even greater in reality.

However, the early teletypewriter was most unreliable and couldn't in any event be set to receive on a greater speed than 45 bauds. Remember also that on-line cryptography was still not at sea so many of the messages [in and out] were still in five-letter code format coded by the Type X/CCM machine or by the newly introduced KL7 Adonis machine.

Out of sequence I know and we will see this picture again, but let's jump to this file/photograph of the early 'belts-and-braces' RATT set up. Click HERE. At this stage we will concentrate on HF only which involves Broadcast reception only, and all we want you to observe are the five receivers <four top shelf and one middle shelf upper >, three of which {2 x B40 and 1 x B41} are devoted to RATT, and two {1 x B40, 1 x B41} for CW. The middle teletypewriter [just the one] is used to print the Fleet RATT Broadcast and the ordinary typewriter over to the right is used by the telegraphist to type the Fleet CW Broadcast...
 
#9
janner said:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110519795505&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:GB:1123

Just the pic brings back a few memories
Cheers Janner, that is definitely a whiff of nostalgia.

Shame that the Calibration door is missing.

Jerry
 
#10
janner said:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110519795505&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:GB:1123

Just the pic brings back a few memories
Your post led me, via sites, to this.....

http://www.godfreydykes.info/SUBMARINE RADIO TRAFFIC FROM THE RUGBY TRANSMITTER.htm



and learned new stuff....Cheers Wings

During the late '50's to mid '70's my father (exYeoman, wartime) procured a B14 and a B28. I had the B28 and listened to all sorts, fishing boats etc but mostly Radio Luxenburg. Happy days
 
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