WHAT'S IT REALLY LIKE?

Discussion in 'Royal Naval Reserve (RNR)' started by npg1701, Aug 29, 2009.

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  1. Hi,

    First post here. Hello everyone.

    I'm interested in joining the RNR.

    I'm in my 40's & ex-Army. I've read the brochures and spoken to the recruiting staff and it's not that I'm discounting what I've seen/heard so far, it's just that I'm trying to find out from "the horse's mouth" what it's really like.

    So.......

    What is the best & worst about the RNR?
    Any hints or tips?
    Any branches that are preferable to others - I'm not looking for a slag-fest tho'!
    What are the chances of getting into the branch that I want?

    Cheers.
     
  2. witsend

    witsend War Hero Book Reviewer

    Hello mate & welcome, I would have a read through the threads on the RNR forum.

    And prob standby for incoming. :wink:
     
  3. Best - easy money, good mates.
    Worst - boredom; monotony of training.

    Certain.

    With regard to which branch - best bet is to visit your local unit and ask about branches, as the RN website is years out of date & AFCO staff don't advise on them (reserve branches I mean).
     
  4. As you are an ex-regular, you may get an age waiver.
    As for branches, (and, as head of branch, I'm obviously a tad biased), I think the Sea(Res) branch may be for you.
    This will involve 6 weeks training, onced you have passed New Entry Training. (a week's course on basic sea survival, a week's course on how to be safe as a sailor onboard [safe deck-hand course], a week on how to fire the SA80 - a sinch for you, a week on how to become an effective member of the Ships' Protection Organisation [SPO], and finally 2 weeks in a Frigate or Destroyer shadowing a SPO rating).
    You are then qualified to act as a fully fledged SPO rating, ie providing Force Protection for an RFA or RN ship, and WILL be mobilised for 9 months. (this will involve approx 6 weeks further training and then 6 months doing the job East of Suez, and then about 2 months leave.
    PM me for further details.
    However, time is against you, so if you areerious, let me know and we can get things moving ASAP.

    Yours Aye

    SO2Seaman
     
  5. SO2Seaman,

    Cheers.

    I've PM'd you.

    Regards, NPG
     
  6. Best - by a considerably way - Mates and the times you have with them.

    Worst - also by a considerably way - Budget restrictions. This often impacts on the training you are allowed to undertake. If the grown ups think that it isn't relevant then there's a good chance you won't get it, regardless of how useful you and many others think it is.

    We are certainly the poor relations of the three armed forces. As i see it we are given the barest of bare minimum of training and equipment with a view to topping it up when we are actually needed to do the job. Not good but if the cash isn't there what can you do?

    After 8 years i'm still in and still really enjoy it and would recommend anyone to join but the frustration does get you down some times.
     
  7. Civvy land. nuff said!
     
  8. MMM, I somehow remember there being a lot of ex regulars in the RNR not to mention the "Civvies" who had done FTRS or had been called up or volunteered and had more sea time and "In theatre operational experence" than half the RN!!

    The good was certainly pay, bounty and mates.

    The bad was disorganised training, monotony, and the fact that in my unit, if you were a seaman and not ex HMS Wessex or a muppet you were treated like crap and a second class citizen!

    and that if you got your missus to join, people from your own and other units would shag her and you ended up divorced! (though in my case I married again, a younger, prettier girl, so infidelity was definately the BEST thing she ever done for me!)

    Can only really say go ahead and join, it will be what you make it, just have a thick skin and open mind!!
     
  9. MMM, I somehow remember there being a lot of ex regulars in the RNR not to mention the "Civvies" who had done FTRS or had been called up or volunteered and had more sea time and "In theatre operational experence" than half the RN!!



    Not in my time matey, :wink:
     
  10. And when I was an Instructer at HMS Forward I remember there being a lot of smart asre civvies who apparently knew more than me. Until their exams came and only 5 out of 17 passed as they never shut up long enough to give their asre a chance. :twisted: :wink:
     
  11. There is at least one RNR branch (and probably more) which has personnel in it that have done numerous op tours, and to echo an earlier post sees a lot more definitively operational work than many personnel do in the regular RN. It's not true of all branches to be sure, but of the RNRs I've met I can think of a few it would be seriously unwise to pull the 'civvy land' stuff on. There's also at least one RNR I know of who has been severely injured in said operations. Plenty of RNRs, like their colleagues in the TA and the RAuxAF have had to face the dangers of operational service and the ingrained prejudice against volunteer reservists is a little outmoded these days.

    (And I'm not an RNR or anything else, for your info!).
     
  12. If your not RNR and your spouting orf all these facts then what are you,dont tell me your a Seacadet instructor, :wink:
     

  13. We was not talking of ops tour's ashore, obviousely most matelots are afloat, but I would not bet on that anymore. I will let a recent sailor reply.
    And please do not try and tell me you ment afloat as I am only aloud to roll on the floor once a day. :wink: :)
     
  14. No, I'm not a Sea Cadet instructor as I told you the other day.

    One of my close friends was blown up by an IED in Iraq and lost his sight, and I know a number of personnel from his branch. I also know some of his colleagues who've had the the words '******* civvy' uttered behind their backs by regular RN personnel who'd never seen a shot fired in anger, when the RNRs in question had been in several different theatres.
     
  15. He watches the news and has friends who know friends who know some one there.

    Aint it funny how the ones who can ,DO,..... and those that can't,.... TALK about it
     
  16. Why weren't we talking about ashore? A number of RNR roles - and as you note a number of RN roles in both Iraq and Afghanistan - involved tours ashore. Something the RN itself has been very keen to get out as part of its PR, and for the regulars AB Nesbitt's bravery has raised the profile of the MAs at least.
     
  17. No pal, those with kidney disease try to join up and are quite rightly rejected.

    They then support the RN, the RNR, and all the services fighting on our behalf as avidly as possible by any means possible. Taking an interest in what friends are doing on my behalf seems the very least I can do.
     
  18. No, I'm not a Sea Cadet instructor as I told you the other day.

    One of my close friends was blown up by an IED in Iraq and lost his sight, and I know a number of personnel from his branch. I also know some of his colleagues who've had the the words '* civvy' uttered behind their backs by regular RN personnel who'd never seen a shot fired in anger, when the RNRs in question had been in several different theatres.


    Respect to them guys,i think you will find that there are quite a few ex RN and serving RN on RR that have been to and seen some bad places,we just are so ferkin humble that even under torture we will never tell our "war dits",my main point is that in my time in the mob the RNR did not ever ever have more sea time than a regular ,and your mixing me up with sombody else because you defo didnt tell me that you wernt a Seacadet instuctor,i`ll let you know that i have a lot of respect for the seacadet guys/gels,
     
  19. I quite accept that. And they still don't of course, I imagine there's far less sea time than there was for the RNR. I also - of course - appreciate the sacrifice the RN makes on a daily basis (ashore and afloat).
     
  20. Just out of curiosity what do you do,this is not a wind up or a bite or anything like that,
     

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