What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Films, Music, TV & All Things Artsy' started by seafarer1939, Oct 29, 2009.

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  1. What books are you reading now that the days are going darker?
    Got a lot of Royal Navy and WW1 history but as a change I recommend my favourites.

    1.I always read "Homers Iliad and Odyessy" twice a year,in fact it's a holiday read.Savage and enthralling from 3000 years ago.

    2.My favourite book is "The Washing of the Spears"Complete story of the Zulu nation including Rorkes Drift and how we wiped out a people who did not want war.

    3.Just reading "The Boys of Everest" and I am in awe of those who climbed this and other mountains.
    All I've climbed is trees and pit heaps!{ I have done some potholing] but I have no fear of heights!climb a mast?I was the seaman to paint it but these mountain climbers!what an special breed of men.
    To suffer lost toes,fingers and a great many drop offs from the mountains puts them as a special type of men,and, with Chris Bonington leading them,we were the best in the world at that time.

    To all those who do high climb I have nothing but admiration but I still wonder why.
    You can lose fingers and toes with the clap but a least you've enjoyed youself.
    I shouldn't jest over such mens courage but it is a helluva read, brings into focus those, who,with such determination to reach the summit,fall 5000ft or freeze in situ.
    Over a 100 bodies are still on Everest not recoverable but maybe it's where they want their final resting place to be if they did not make it.
    Some may understand it but I don't.
    Royals mountain troop probably have the answer,I don't have that type of courage.Great book to read.

    4."History of the Border Reivers" and the clans who ran the Borders[well I do live here]

    5."The Sailors War 1914-1918" by Peter H.Liddle brings Jutland into focus and the letters home from young Midshipmen saying how "Action would be a jolly good thing to look forward too!"Sad!
    Something was wrong with our bloody ships that day,lack of good gunnery and leadership I suspect.

    6."The Exploration of North America 1630-1776, detailed and absorbing.
    We deserved Canada, we had it and it turned out a fine country.
    We do get somethings right.

    Always on the lookout for a good read,not much of a TV person and now the golf course is too cold and wet.
    Anything recommended will be appreciated.Cheers.
  2. Just finished Assegai by Wilbur Smith. Most of his boooks are a good read.
    Need to visit Waterstones at the weekend.
  3. Blackrat

    Blackrat War Hero Moderator Book Reviewer

    At present, "The Junior Officers Reading Club" by Patrick Hennessey. Not a bad read as it goes considering the author is an ex Guards Officer.
  4. Just finish Miracle in the Andes now reading touching the Void.
  5. seafarer1939,

    I also read an awful lot of WWI books, but I too am taking a break from reading such material at present. This week I have been reading The Guinness Book of Royal Blunders by Geoffrey Regan.

    The author Geoffrey Regan casts a jaundiced eye over the lapses, gaffes and peccadiloes of Kings, queens and kaisers.

    The book presents a colourful and varied collection of princely portraits, however, these are not the flattering likenesses of a Holbein or a Van Dyck, but warts-and-all exposés of regal ignominy. From calamitous coronations to farcical funerals, from grand occasions mismanaged to marriages mishandled, the author lays bare the turbulent public and private lives as diverse as Ludwig II of Bavaria and Edward VIII.
    Whether born of wickedness, naivety or plain idiocy, the blunders of royalty past and present make for hilarious and fascinating reading.

  6. Last book: The girl with the dragon tattoo, Stieg Larsson.

    Current book: Atonement, Ian McKewan.

    Next book: The girl who played with fire, Stieg Larsson.

    If you had asked me last month, The sea, John Banville.
  7. Any of the Millennium novels by Stieg Larsson are enthusiastically recommended but if you want some Naval theme try Barrow's boys by Fergus Flemming.
  8. wet_blobby

    wet_blobby War Hero Moderator

    If your into your history try these:

    "Bury my heart at wounded knee" It's an Indian history of the American west by Dee Brown.

    "Quartered safe out here" a personal memoir of the war in Burma by George Macdonald Fraser.
  9. I really recommend Miracle in the Andes, its based on the film Alive, but from a first hand account on what happened. I was hooked on it, only took 3 days to finish it. For me it showed what human spirit and surival is all about if forced in a situation where lives are at stake. Also it gives a indepth description of why they were forced to eating the dead, and the feelings at the time. and what happened after the rescue mission.
  10. How can a book which is a 'first hand account' of a real incident, be based on a film which is about the actual incident?

    Surely that's a bit arse about tit?
  11. The book came out years b 4 the film, and is a touch graphic. i will never 4 get the (discussion) re cooked v raw meat.I also remember this (crash) happening tho it was years later the truth came out.
    Best books (well im a gir/womanl) so
    Gone with the Wind
    Marjorie Morningstar
    Midnight Express
    Fires of Spring (JA Michener)Or any of his books
    Likewise Bryce Courtenay
  12. thanks for those, I'll check them out!
  13. witsend

    witsend War Hero Book Reviewer

    Another Jack Reacher book, fiction thriller.
  14. Not so. It was a matter of days.
  15. What age r u? this was in the 70s
  16. 1972, Stroppy cow yes (my words) don't mess with a girl that know's her books
  17. Yes, it was the early 70s. What's that got to do with it? The survivors got rescued and within days the story came out.

    Even the dimmist South American is hardly going to sit around for years thinking "hmm, how did they survive? And why are all these half eaten bodies lying around?".

    I believe it was a rugby team, so they'd have been used to eating other men anyhow.

    Don't mess with a man who knows where to put an apostrophe.
  18. "The Last Theorem", a joint effort from Arthur C. Clarke and Frederick Pohl.

    I really only bought it because I believe it's Clarke's last ever novel but so far, (I'm about a sixth of the way through it), I'm a bit disappointed, especially comparing it to his earlier stuff.

    Even if you're not at at all interested in sci-fi I would recommend Clarke's Childhood's End, The Fountains of Paradise and The Songs of Distant Earth
  19. Halting State by Charles Stross - not bad, not gripping.


    The Science of the Discworld III, Darwin's Watch by Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen. A a delightful series of books that contains both great science and the fun and the story that one associates with Terry Pratchett.

    Which reminds me, I must collect my library card and see if any of my favourite horror writers have written anything new, my collection is old and has been read many times over.

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