War Stories

Rumrat said:
I have conceded that Some of my dates were questionable as I have not viewed the piece I wrote since it went to the museum.
I do not think he was an RSM at Omdurman I recall he was a lower life at that time. His promotion to SM or RSM may have been when he was shipped away from his Regiment when he married. He definitely was a depot RSM that much has been determined by the reg.
He was discharged from the Dorset reg when he finally left service, and had served in/attached too, two other regiments.
I well remember he never talked of his exploits very often, as he was a man of few words.
I have a pic of him in Red tunic, its one of those coloured after took Victorian efforts and it was my discovery of this that prompted him to tell me he had fought in Sudan in Red. He actually did join in 1887 as when he joined the Navy he was 14 but lied.
I did not know him well and only met him for a short period in 1956 when I was 6. He died two weeks after my dad brought me with him to England in 1961, we came as he was dying, for dad to see him one last time.
He viewed the Martini Henry as the "Modern" rifle it being introduced into the British army the year after he was born.
Whilst they were part one firearms he kept one secreted in his house and it came into my dads possession after grandad died.
I have a "As New 1876 pat Bayonet that he left dad and now I own it, and it was this that got me into collecting military weapons.
I took and passed a degree in political History whilst in the Andrew, and have never used it since. 8O :roll:

Pretty good life then. He was probably having more fun than my great grandad, who spent the same period down a coal mine - literally after he was killed down one in 1880 aged 36 - he was identified by his boots after his body had lain under a tarp at the pit head for 4 days.... That's why I get interested in peoples' stories - there's always something there worth looking at.
 

Rumrat

War Hero
kinross_special said:
Rumrat said:
I have conceded that Some of my dates were questionable as I have not viewed the piece I wrote since it went to the museum.
I do not think he was an RSM at Omdurman I recall he was a lower life at that time. His promotion to SM or RSM may have been when he was shipped away from his Regiment when he married. He definitely was a depot RSM that much has been determined by the reg.
He was discharged from the Dorset reg when he finally left service, and had served in/attached too, two other regiments.
I well remember he never talked of his exploits very often, as he was a man of few words.
I have a pic of him in Red tunic, its one of those coloured after took Victorian efforts and it was my discovery of this that prompted him to tell me he had fought in Sudan in Red. He actually did join in 1887 as when he joined the Navy he was 14 but lied.
I did not know him well and only met him for a short period in 1956 when I was 6. He died two weeks after my dad brought me with him to England in 1961, we came as he was dying, for dad to see him one last time.
He viewed the Martini Henry as the "Modern" rifle it being introduced into the British army the year after he was born.
Whilst they were part one firearms he kept one secreted in his house and it came into my dads possession after grandad died.
I have a "As New 1876 pat Bayonet that he left dad and now I own it, and it was this that got me into collecting military weapons.
I took and passed a degree in political History whilst in the Andrew, and have never used it since. 8O :roll:

Pretty good life then. He was probably having more fun than my great grandad, who spent the same period down a coal mine - literally after he was killed down one in 1880 aged 36 - he was identified by his boots after his body had lain under a tarp at the pit head for 4 days.... That's why I get interested in peoples' stories - there's always something there worth looking at.

My Mothers brother is a person I am trying with limited success to trace, as he is a far and away the most difficult to tab.
he left Australia in 1937 to join up and this we know he did. He was accepted into the army in 1937, but transferred voluntarily into special forces in 1938.
He finished his training and was sent to Poland in 1940. He served in France for a short time in 1941 just into 1942, but then he becomes hard to keep up with.
The last time he was heard of directly was a letter that my aunt received in 1944 posted 43 which places him in the Crimea but he was heard about from a friends son who saw him back in Poland by late 43 early 44.
We think he might have been at Kursk, or even in the last stand just prior to the Red Army entering Berlin but either scenario is at best an educated guess.
He is listed as missing on the Eastern front 1943, and my nan for some reason received his medals and decorations in 1974.
He was originally in the SS Leibstandarte 3, but after war started who knows,? we don't only that he stayed SS.
Her other Brother Joined the RM and served aboard HMS Diadem on Russian Convoys.
Strange World.
 
Rumrat said:
kinross_special said:
Rumrat said:
I have conceded that Some of my dates were questionable as I have not viewed the piece I wrote since it went to the museum.
I do not think he was an RSM at Omdurman I recall he was a lower life at that time. His promotion to SM or RSM may have been when he was shipped away from his Regiment when he married. He definitely was a depot RSM that much has been determined by the reg.
He was discharged from the Dorset reg when he finally left service, and had served in/attached too, two other regiments.
I well remember he never talked of his exploits very often, as he was a man of few words.
I have a pic of him in Red tunic, its one of those coloured after took Victorian efforts and it was my discovery of this that prompted him to tell me he had fought in Sudan in Red. He actually did join in 1887 as when he joined the Navy he was 14 but lied.
I did not know him well and only met him for a short period in 1956 when I was 6. He died two weeks after my dad brought me with him to England in 1961, we came as he was dying, for dad to see him one last time.
He viewed the Martini Henry as the "Modern" rifle it being introduced into the British army the year after he was born.
Whilst they were part one firearms he kept one secreted in his house and it came into my dads possession after grandad died.
I have a "As New 1876 pat Bayonet that he left dad and now I own it, and it was this that got me into collecting military weapons.
I took and passed a degree in political History whilst in the Andrew, and have never used it since. 8O :roll:

Pretty good life then. He was probably having more fun than my great grandad, who spent the same period down a coal mine - literally after he was killed down one in 1880 aged 36 - he was identified by his boots after his body had lain under a tarp at the pit head for 4 days.... That's why I get interested in peoples' stories - there's always something there worth looking at.

My Mothers brother is a person I am trying with limited success to trace, as he is a far and away the most difficult to tab.
he left Australia in 1937 to join up and this we know he did. He was accepted into the army in 1937, but transferred voluntarily into special forces in 1938.
He finished his training and was sent to Poland in 1940. He served in France for a short time in 1941 just into 1942, but then he becomes hard to keep up with.
The last time he was heard of directly was a letter that my aunt received in 1944 posted 43 which places him in the Crimea but he was heard about from a friends son who saw him back in Poland by late 43 early 44.
We think he might have been at Kursk, or even in the last stand just prior to the Red Army entering Berlin but either scenario is at best an educated guess.
He is listed as missing on the Eastern front 1943, and my nan for some reason received his medals and decorations in 1974.
He was originally in the SS Leibstandarte 3, but after war started who knows,? we don't only that he stayed SS.
Her other Brother Joined the RM and served aboard HMS Diadem on Russian Convoys.
Strange World.

Yep, can see why you might struggle to track him down...
 
Rumrat said:
[..................
................
He finished his training and was sent to Poland in 1940. He served in France for a short time in 1941 just into 1942, but then he becomes hard to keep up with.
The last time he was heard of directly was a letter that my aunt received in 1944 posted 43 which places him in the Crimea but he was heard about from a friends son who saw him back in Poland by late 43 early 44.
We think he might have been at Kursk, or even in the last stand just prior to the Red Army entering Berlin but either scenario is at best an educated guess.
He is listed as missing on the Eastern front 1943, and my nan for some reason received his medals and decorations in 1974.
He was originally in the SS Leibstandarte 3, but after war started who knows,? we don't only that he stayed SS.
Her other Brother Joined the RM and served aboard HMS Diadem on Russian Convoys.
Strange World.

Try:

www.waffen-ss.no

This could be III Infanterie Batallion (Motorised) under the command of an SS Major Wiedenhaupt.

You never know, but it's not unknown for relatives to fight on opposite sides in a conflict, there are many stories of the US Civil war in 1860s.
 

Rumrat

War Hero
whitemouse said:
Rumrat said:
[..................
................
He finished his training and was sent to Poland in 1940. He served in France for a short time in 1941 just into 1942, but then he becomes hard to keep up with.
The last time he was heard of directly was a letter that my aunt received in 1944 posted 43 which places him in the Crimea but he was heard about from a friends son who saw him back in Poland by late 43 early 44.
We think he might have been at Kursk, or even in the last stand just prior to the Red Army entering Berlin but either scenario is at best an educated guess.
He is listed as missing on the Eastern front 1943, and my nan for some reason received his medals and decorations in 1974.
He was originally in the SS Leibstandarte 3, but after war started who knows,? we don't only that he stayed SS.
Her other Brother Joined the RM and served aboard HMS Diadem on Russian Convoys.
Strange World.

Try:

www.waffen-ss.no

This could be III Infanterie Batallion (Motorised) under the command of an SS Major Wiedenhaupt.

You never know, but it's not unknown for relatives to fight on opposite sides in a conflict, there are many stories of the US Civil war in 1860s.


WM His name was so easy to remember as unlike the other members of his family he refused to change it or even Anglicise it when the family arrived and settled in Australia in 1931. The original name was Braun and when he refused to take the name the rest did, he was asked to make it Brown, but refused.
My mum said he would have been a perfect Nazi as he was very arrogant, and being older, liked what he had seen in Germany, before the family left.

My interest in him is purely academic, it would be just tying up a loose end if I ever found his fate. Certainly no tears, unless there was a Swiss bank account in the offering. Full. :twisted: :roll: :D
 
Steve,

Swiss Bank acct, Mmmmm.... :idea: .If you send me your Bank account details there is a fellow I know in Nigeria who is ever so good at transferring between cross-border accounts. 8)
 

Rumrat

War Hero
BreathingOutOnTheWayUp said:
Steve,

Swiss Bank acct, Mmmmm.... :idea: .If you send me your Bank account details there is a fellow I know in Nigeria who is ever so good at transferring between cross-border accounts. 8)


Thank god for that, I thought I might get cheated.
 
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