Unspent convictions

Discussion in 'RMR' started by Skip, Jun 18, 2008.

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  1. ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................
     
  2. I think the important words are 'not necessarily', the get out of 'jail free card' sort of phrase that all employers put into contracts and or application forms, it means if it suits them they may consider your case, if it doesn't they wont. Your situation seems to fit the latter scenario.
    Quite frankly to plead guilty to something that you claim you're not guilty of to "speed things up" is always a mistake. Unless you were going to get a pat on the back and a cheerio from the Judge/Magistrate you should have realised that it would effect your Recruitment.
    Without knowledge of your particular case, and I'm not going to enter into a discussion of it, I'd say you're only hope is to pay another visit to the AFCO explain your situation again and ask if there is some higher authority you can appeal to.
    Good luck.
     
  3. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    Eligibility for Regular & Reserve forces is identical, the oft held belief that the Reserves accept lower standards is a myth. (Although the URNU organisation allow a greater degree of latitude of medical standards for entry.) The Royal Navy website is a guide of general advice and is in no way the definitive binding reference, hence the disclaimer on the site, so it's to no avail quoting it as the authority.

    The current rules state that the rehabilitation period for a conditional discharge, from date of conviction is 1 year or until the order expires (whichever is longer).

    Compensation, however (because it indicates the seriousness of the offence) has a rehabilitation period of 5 years from date of conviction, subject to reduction by half if under the age of 17 upon conviction.

    If you have previous convictions for offences against the person there is little prospect of a criminal conviction waiver, however, depending on the merit of the individual you MAY be considered for a waiver at the two and a half point onwards. It may help your case further if you were to express regret rather than indignation and you should be aware that even if you maybe considered for a waiver, it often gets turned-down depending on the nature of the offence so proclaiming to "know your rights" probably won't help your case.

    Different services, incidentally may consider criminal conviction waivers at different points of the rehabilitation period.

    As the rehabilitation of Offenders Act is law, you can only appeal against the law rather than the fact your AFCO is applying the law as dictated. You will have signed a post-interview caution after your interview stating that it is a condition of entry that you must inform the Service if you are subject to criminal prosecution.

    The best of luck to you.
     
  4. Thanks for the reply.

    I'll take your advice & try for an appeal to a higher authority.

    This desk job is NOT for me!
     
  5. Thanks....

    I'll see what I can find out about a conviction waiver.

    I have LOADS of regret - don't worry about that! It was the biggest mistake i've ever made!

    I take full responsibilty of my actions & don't expect any special treatment but am finding it hard to accept that throwing a couple of punches in a provoked attack has most likely cost me a career with the Royal Marines. It's ironic that the Magistrate asked me how much my monthly salary would be during the recruit training & tailored the monthly compensation payments to suit that.

    BIG lesson learnt & loads of time to think about it at my boring desk job!
     
  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    Incidentally, after your conviction is spent or prior to applying for a waiver, you must provide proof of complete payment of all fines & compensation.

    Best of luck. :thumright:
     

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