University or the Navy?

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Funnily enough I was 2i/c at Oxford URNU for about three years - heartily recommended for those going to uni, aspiring to join the RN upon graduation.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
For those aspiring to join as Officers, it is worth bearing in mind that starting pay, seniority and promotion for graduates is exactly the same as non-graduates.

The advantage of joining a branch that doesn't require a degree? 18 year olds have a three year promotional advantage opportunity which may well mean they actually have a larger window of opportunity to achieve the higher ranks in relation to those joining 3 or more years older.
 

Jack Sparrow

Lantern Swinger
It is your choice only, so only you can really say what is more important to you. I joined at 15, and did 12 years, when I left I eventually studied Interior Design for 4 years and have had a wonderful life ever since.
My older sister did over 20 years, and when she left went to university for a couple of years and became a computer annalist, so once again, it is your choice.
 

slim

War Hero
It is your choice only, so only you can really say what is more important to you. I joined at 15, and did 12 years, when I left I eventually studied Interior Design for 4 years and have had a wonderful life ever since.
My older sister did over 20 years, and when she left went to university for a couple of years and became a computer annalist, so once again, it is your choice.

Well I thought I knew a lot about computers but have never found one that was ****:(
 

squigga

Midshipman
@fvrz simple:
Uni; good social life, course stress, poor health (from poor diet, lack of sleep, stress etc.)/infamous "fresher's flu", debt (don't forget the inflation rise on the interest on the student loan) as well as good friends. Also, most men and his dogs have degrees nowadays and graduate jobs are very, VERY competitive as well as not forgetting the massive skills gap trend rising because of the university route most young people have opted for...

On the other hand,

RN; Good social life, get fit, make good friends, travel, debt-free (unless you count the I-O-U's from the previous night out.....), chances to gain education/qualifications whilst earning...

I know which one I would pick! Hope this helps
 

Jack Sparrow

Lantern Swinger
@fvrz simple:
Uni; good social life, course stress, poor health (from poor diet, lack of sleep, stress etc.)/infamous "fresher's flu", debt (don't forget the inflation rise on the interest on the student loan) as well as good friends. Also, most men and his dogs have degrees nowadays and graduate jobs are very, VERY competitive as well as not forgetting the massive skills gap trend rising because of the university route most young people have opted for...

On the other hand,

RN; Good social life, get fit, make good friends, travel, debt-free (unless you count the I-O-U's from the previous night out.....), chances to gain education/qualifications whilst earning...

I know which one I would pick! Hope this helps
A good point squigga, I did extra schooling in the mob, got educationally qualified for the SD list, but chose to leave the mob and pursue other avenues, and have never regreted for one second doing my 12 years before the mast. We are a long time dead, so do whatever floats your boat whilst you can, or risk living a life of regret if you don't.
 
As someone who got the RN to pay for him to go to Uni, I'd say do both!

If being an aircrewman is what you want to do, I'd suggest you do that straight off instead of going to Uni.
 
Without a pair of crystal balls it's impossible to know. I have some relevant experience which may or may not be useful.

I did 6 years as a RO from 16, then an access to HE course at a local college (condensed A levels, kind of) then Uni for 4.

At 22 I was laughably called a mature student - but having spent 6 years in the Andrew, 4 of those at sea on hoofing deployments, the difference between my cohorts and I was marked.

(Aside: my Uni friends / forced acquaintances had real problems with my dits. They were all mine and all 100% gen of course but nevertheless I eventually learned that they weren't ready for them yet - possibly never would be nor were they good ice breakers).

I struggled with Uni life, not the academic aspects just the being a student bit. I found it incredibly boring. You cannot compare it in any way to being in the Mob. Although one upside was that as someone with a little bit of life experience I got stacks :)

For many years I questioned the usefullness of it, my first job (in the City no less) after graduation was based on my time in the mob and the next 2 based on my previous job etc. I had never needed it, never even asked to prove I had a degree. Until recently I viewed it as 4 wasted years just accruing debt that took another 5 to pay off.

However, when I moved oversees a few years back, one of the requirements for my work VISA was to have an undergraduate degree. Again, not needed for my job but so glad I endured those 4 expensive and useless years

As others have said - only you can make the decision. I guess my (rather longwinded) points are:

That joining up now in a branch/role that you want (and is available) does not preclude you from studying at a later stage. The double whammy of adapting to civvy and also student life simultaneously is hard but not a show-stopper. Vice versa is also true.

Degrees can be useless but also immensly useful - if you are capable of getting one, then you should. At some point. You never know when it may come in handy.
 

Subbers

Midshipman
I found this article incredibly useful! I am currently also in the process of applying for ACMN and have my FAT's coming up...my my what a popular role! ;)

However, I am struggling with a plan B to be honest. I am also 18, finished college...with all passes and a healthy amount of UCAS points inc an A in Russian. I am not sure whether to go to university or not, should my ACMN go tits up...I am sure it won't but a plan B is always good.

Should I apply for a different role or see about maybe getting a foundation degree for example apprenticeship in Aerospace Engineering? Or pursue something down the languages route?
 

Jack Sparrow

Lantern Swinger
I found this article incredibly useful! I am currently also in the process of applying for ACMN and have my FAT's coming up...my my what a popular role! ;)

However, I am struggling with a plan B to be honest. I am also 18, finished college...with all passes and a healthy amount of UCAS points inc an A in Russian. I am not sure whether to go to university or not, should my ACMN go tits up...I am sure it won't but a plan B is always good.

Should I apply for a different role or see about maybe getting a foundation degree for example apprenticeship in Aerospace Engineering? Or pursue something down the languages route?
You are the only one who can answer those questions. Whatever you decide, make sure it's what you want to do, something you can see yourself wanting to follow through with as a career move. Best of luck.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
I found this article incredibly useful! I am currently also in the process of applying for ACMN and have my FAT's coming up...my my what a popular role! ;)

However, I am struggling with a plan B to be honest. I am also 18, finished college...with all passes and a healthy amount of UCAS points inc an A in Russian. I am not sure whether to go to university or not, should my ACMN go tits up...I am sure it won't but a plan B is always good.

Should I apply for a different role or see about maybe getting a foundation degree for example apprenticeship in Aerospace Engineering? Or pursue something down the languages route?
Have a look at AET - You could get the same qualification whilst serving...and top it up to a BSc whilst earning a full-time wage.
 
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