University etc

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
chris78290 said:
Sentenashi said:
Well the guy I spoke to, a Lt Cdr said that if I applied and got through in my "lower sixth" year then I would have a place at the end of my A-levels, no further AIB required.

He's wrong.

Actually, he's correct if he is awarded a Reserved Place, so far as I'm aware.

The AIB can be valid longer than 12 months under the Reserved Place scheme. Those going on from a scholarship & applying for a Bursary will need to re-sit AIB.
 

cadetsmum

Lantern Swinger
airborne_artist said:
Aged 16 he could have applied for a two year sixth-form scholarship, and then he'd be at AIB next month.
Tell me about it - although he made initial contact last September, his AFCO only told him last month he had missed the deadline for applying :banghead: :banghead:

[quote="airborne_artist]
The only people who fail are those that have not made the grade. There are no tricks employed, and your comment sounds like a trick to me.[/quote]

I can only tell you what Junior was told - seemed strange to me but in a weird way made sense.......otherwise why would he be told this by a serving RN training officer
 
Ninja_Stoker said:
chris78290 said:
Sentenashi said:
Well the guy I spoke to, a Lt Cdr said that if I applied and got through in my "lower sixth" year then I would have a place at the end of my A-levels, no further AIB required.

He's wrong.

Actually, he's correct if he is awarded a Reserved Place, so far as I'm aware.

The AIB can be valid longer than 12 months under the Reserved Place scheme. Those going on from a scholarship & applying for a Bursary will need to re-sit AIB.

I stand corrected, I must admit i'd never heard of this Reserved Place scheme, I just looked it up. It makes little sense to me because if you aren't good enough to get a scholarship why should you have a place reserved for you when in theory there could be dozens of better candidates in your year of entry who are coming to the process from the other avenues such as graduates, other school leavers etc and will be looked over because of you.

Oh well, guess it made sense to somebody at some point (sort of makes a mockery of the idea that you must not take longer than one year from PJFT and medical or you will have to redo though.)
 
Chris, dry your eyes. If it cheers you up any, it was three years between my AIB pass and going to BRNC. I never once went back to SULTAN to re-sit my AIB, and off the back of it I got a VIth form scholarship and a cadetship.

Reserved places exist, if you get one you get one, if you don't you don't.

As for 'failing people' to test their determination, that is utter bollocks. Safeguard, all clips, no sh*t. The RN doesn't work that way, and if it did, I promise you a lot of people would be up in arms about it.
 

cadetsmum

Lantern Swinger
alfred_the_great said:
As for 'failing people' to test their determination, that is utter bollocks. Safeguard, all clips, no sh*t. The RN doesn't work that way, and if it did, I promise you a lot of people would be up in arms about it.

As I said I can only tell what Junior told us he was told ......perhaps it was the RN training officer testing Junior ? :wink:
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
It would be rather naive for us to believe recruiters don't make mistakes, however what often happens is the applicant may on occasion suffer selective hearing.

Generally we will say something like: "If you don't pass AIB but come back at a later stage, it will at least demonstrate you are motivated"

...but what is heard is something like:

"You won't pass AIB, but come back at a later stage & it will demonstrate you are motivated"
 

IB08

Lantern Swinger
I half agree with cadets mum, although I think it happens more with the warfare branch. The warfare branch is very oversubscribed with applications, probably due to you not needing a degree to do warfare and not having to pass FATs etc. With 18 and 19 year old candidates, it is not uncommon for very good candidates to be told to come back in a year, my gut feeling is that this is because they want to test their determination. I dont think it would happen with FAA candidates.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
We cannot turn-away academically eligible candidates on grounds of their age by law. We could raise the bar & insist on higher academic qualifications, but other than raising the UCAS points required, we haven't yet.

It may well be that older candidates will have more life-experience, management experience (& qualifications) however extremely good non-gradutes are as likely to pass selection as extremely good graduates - what many don't realise is that those that do make the grade are very, very good.

OK, we get the odd duffer, but not many.
 

hamisatypeofcheese

Lantern Swinger
cadetsmum said:
I do have some sympathy - schools these days seemed geared up for 6th formers to go to Uni - those that don't want to go seem to be in the minority.
that's completely true, I had to fight tooth and nail not to apply to university
 

Sentenashi

War Hero
Ninja_Stoker said:
We cannot turn-away academically eligible candidates on grounds of their age by law. We could raise the bar & insist on higher academic qualifications, but other than raising the UCAS points required, we haven't yet.

It may well be that older candidates will have more life-experience, management experience (& qualifications) however extremely good non-gradutes are as likely to pass selection as extremely good graduates - what many don't realise is that those that do make the grade are very, very good.

OK, we get the odd duffer, but not many.

So do graduates have more chance of being selected than non-graduates, or do less non-grads apply than grads, hence the 80-20 proportion at dartmouth?
 

R077

MIA
Sentenashi said:
Ninja_Stoker said:
We cannot turn-away academically eligible candidates on grounds of their age by law. We could raise the bar & insist on higher academic qualifications, but other than raising the UCAS points required, we haven't yet.

It may well be that older candidates will have more life-experience, management experience (& qualifications) however extremely good non-gradutes are as likely to pass selection as extremely good graduates - what many don't realise is that those that do make the grade are very, very good.

OK, we get the odd duffer, but not many.

So do graduates have more chance of being selected than non-graduates, or do less non-grads apply than grads, hence the 80-20 proportion at dartmouth?

I would hazard (assuming factors such as natural ability etc. remain constant between both groups) that it is life maturity/age and not qualifications (except in Eng fields obviously) that has the greater bearing. Are all non-graduates younger, hence, less experienced? Or do the older more experienced non-graduates get in just as 'easily' as a graduate? Swings and roundabouts. Got the UCAS points, got the life experience and a sound head. That should do it :thumbleft:

Just so happens that a graduate automatically spends an extra 4/5 years of their life at University/College and therefore has no other option than to natually rack up a little more years than a fresh school leaver. My own experience of fresh, younger folk (non-grads) in the potential officer category has ranged from hopeless to fantastic and shades inbetween. Likewise, I know of graduates who, if I were subordinate/peer on their command of a ship, I would seriously consider jumping and swimming to the nearest continent. Really. :(
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
R077 said:
Sentenashi said:
Ninja_Stoker said:
...It may well be that older candidates will have more life-experience, management experience (& qualifications) however extremely good non-gradutes are as likely to pass selection as extremely good graduates

So do graduates have more chance of being selected than non-graduates, or do less non-grads apply than grads, hence the 80-20 proportion at dartmouth?

..Are all non-graduates younger, hence, less experienced? Or do the older more experienced non-graduates get in just as 'easily' as a graduate? Swings and roundabouts. Got the UCAS points, got the life experience and a sound head. That should do it

Just so happens that a graduate automatically spends an extra 4/5 years of their life at University/College and therefore has no other option than to natually rack up a little more years than a fresh school leaver...

Yep, as stated the older the candidate, regardless the academic qualifications, the more chance they will have developed management & leadership experience. You cannot compare non graduates with graduatuates as experience is the pertinent issue.

We have more than double the amount of graduate applicants for Officer than non-graduates possibly simply because the government thinks everyone should have a degree regardless of ability. The issue is that a degree does not an officer make, but people mistakenly think that because they have a degree they therefore must be an officer candidate.

The problem is that graduates start on £29K, undergraduates start on £16K so the outward perception is that we prefer graduates - we don't when it's a non-vocational degree. However, to entice the high calibre individuals we offer nearly double the starting wage due to the fact a non-grad will have earnt considerably more if they join straight after A levels.

I think the RN is in the top 7 of UK graduate employers or thereabouts so we also attract a lot of unsuiatable candidates who are motivated purely by the headline salary.
 
Top