uni or navy?

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by robbo9, Mar 14, 2007.

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  1. uni

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  2. navy

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  1. hello all.
    im in a middle of a crisis at the moment. im 1st year at uni trianing to be a teacher. which i would enjoy teahcing, but i hate the course and some of the people are complete t**ts. and ive always wanted to join forces, and navy MA sounds best for me.

    so do i stay at uni and get into £26,000 for 4 years and remina skint in those years, or do i join up, lose my freeedome, but travel and play rugby and get paid for it? and have mates, real mates?

    help me guys, i need advice

    thanks in advance

    9
     
  2. It depends on what your long term aim is.

    Don't bang out of Uni just yet - visit the Armed Forces Careers Office and find out what options are open to you. Decide what branch you want to join, whether you want to join as an officer or rating, and method of entry - straight in or by getting sponsored through Uni.

    You may be able to get sponsorship for a degree from the RN, especially if you want to be an engineer (depends a lot on your A-levels).

    However, there are also plenty of paths in the RN that do not require a degree, but which get you a Foundation Degree later on, with the chance to go further.

    You won't lose your freedom in the RN - you'll just have more responsibility and be expected to earn your wage!

    So it isn't a straight "yes" or "no" - hedge your bets - see what you want to do first, then make your move.
     
  3. hi
    why don't you do both? either as an officer or a grunt eg RNR (royal naval reserve or the officer equivlant. give it a thought
    ship_rat
     
  4. Join the Navy - we need teachers who can spell!
     
  5. If your degree is a 'sensible' one I would not counsel junking it, better to get and then try the RN. As mentioned above there are sponsorship schemes, not just from the RN, my son was sponsored by DES although he never took up their job offer.

    You may also have the option to change course to one more suited to an RN career as well so you need to do your research and then take an informed descision of which way you jump. As well as the recruiters you need to speak to your tutor at Uni as well.

    Dopes your uni have an RN unit, there may be some good avice there too.
     
  6. You may be over qualified for entry as a Medical Assistant. You must be sure that you are set on a career as a Medical Assistant in the RN Medical Service; i.e. are you sure that you want to look after sick and injured people as a rating, albeit in ships, submarines and Royal Marines. If you want a career in the RN Medical Service but "officer" sounds better, why not do nurse training first and then join as a nursing officer. Although you may end up as a nursing officer at Selly Oak! You could also ask at the RN Careers office about Medical Technician training.
     
  7. I would definatly go to uni!

    for a start, bein on the lower decks in the mob is GASH, i would only suggest to anyone wanting to join, to join as an officer.

    the navy does give you good qualifications, but it takes one hell of a long time-to stand any chance in civvi street post RN, you relly need to have made it to PO level, with a bit of time done in that job, so you're lookin at least 6yrs for an MA (and thats if you're SERIOUSLY good at the job) more likely to be closer to 10.

    However, if you enjoy cleaning everything, then when its clean, cleaning it again. Then just for good measure, ripping the ship apart on monday and tuesday so you can REALLY clean for CO's rounds on wednesday. then cleanin again on thursday..........you get the point.

    wakka.
     
  8. Education, education education. If your degree is a sensible degree leading to a qualification that is not only recognised but respected then go to university. Do it now as to try and do it in later life is much more difficult.
    Once you have a degree then try to enter as an officer. Life is much better.
     
  9. Maxi it seems to me that when it comes to education we seem to be in agreement more often than not.
     
  10. Something I was told when I was first considering joining the forces: "The more you go in with, the more you come out with".

    I could drone on and on about the virtues of a university education but localising it to the RN, if you have a degree then it can open more doors for you in terms of what branch you decide to join.

    Example, you enjoy teaching, and you want to join the navy. Training Management Officer. Just a thought?
     
  11. How old are you?

    I started Uni at 18, joined the T.A at the same time and did 3 years. Decided I enjoyed the Military lifestyle and joined the Navy as a Diver last year. Loving every minute of it. There are a lot of knobbers at uni, but there are also a lot of knobbers in the Forces. People are idiots, it's a fact of life - whatever job you do, there will be knobbers.

    If I were you, i'd finish your degree, join one of the Reserve Forces and enjoy the ride - you might find the Forces aren't really your thing. Either way, a degree is a handy thing to have as there is always the possibility of going for your commission in the future.
     
  12. Has to be the Navy in my opinion. The opportunities are there to gain degrees whilst you serve in the Mob, even in teaching. I met a CPO once who was a fully qualified teacher. I'm taking a guess here but I assume that a shore based MA will have ample time time to study in their spare time, if they decided not to go out and get on it.
     
  13. Spot on Jockgolly. Ive always found the mob happy to spend money on external training ie SLC's ELC's but most just need to find the time to use them (which is easier said than done) A few years ago i was able to resit GCSE's whilst shore based MA, local colleges offered loads in the evening for those that could be arsed.
     
  14. Though the services are extremely good when it comes to education. Attaining a degree while serving will prove far more difficult that attaining GCSEs and A levels. Degree courses generally take years rather than months. The majority of servicemen will not be guaranteed that they will spend the required time in one place. I had to drop out of my second year of HNC because of service commitments (day release in Salisbury difficult to do from Aberporth in Wales).
    I would highly recommend taking your degree before entering the navy. it could be to your advantage to liaise with the careers officer to ensure that the degree which you choose is suitable for the position you would like.
     

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