UCAS Points Clarification

Altieri

Midshipman
Lamri said:
Altieri said:
Hey,Snippety Snip

Just to explain, No degree necessary.

I originally applied for this role last year after finishing my degree.

Altieri

Erm, so you HAVE a degree, but this still isn't good enough so you are trying to top up points with an AS level ?

Yours,

Confused of Guzz.

Yeah I know, seems crazy. But thems the rules.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Yep, just to clarify: a degree on its own is not acceptable:

Ninja_Stoker said:
Why are GCSE & A Levels required when you have a Degree? Because you need to prove a broad-based educational background.

Hope that helps, subject to Chico's verification & good luck.
 
Erm.... things have certainly changed since 1979, when you could become an ossifer with just 2 good A Levels (grade C and above) and the foreknowledge of the correct handling of a knife and fork ;)

An oppo of mine at school in 1979 actually failed to get into Sandhurst with two Grade A's at A level because he didn't know how to use a knife & fork correctly, he didn't speak the Queen's English and probably the real reason: he went to a state comprehensive.
 

Altieri

Midshipman
Just an update. Was at the careers office today and apparently the minimum requirements HAVE gone up. You now need 180 UCAS points (equivolent to 2 B's at A Level) for the warfare officer position.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Altieri said:
Just an update. Was at the careers office today and apparently the minimum requirements HAVE gone up. You now need 180 UCAS points (equivolent to 2 B's at A Level) for the warfare officer position.

They WILL go up when the recruiting instruction is issued, but at close of play today (17:00), it hadn't been issued. You are completely right that it is about to go up for ALL specialisations, including graduates.

Those that take their A2's this summer that haven't already made an application will undoubtedly need to have 180 rather than 140 UCAS points.

The moral is to submit a completed application form now rather than later if you have less than 180 UCAS points. Possibly the ACLO's have been briefed not to take applications off individuals with less than the 180 points, but as far as everyone else is concerned, it ain't happened. Yet.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
As long as you're academically qualified & are recommended by your Divisional Officer (ie: you haven't established a track record of being an utter plonker), then there's very little anyone can do other than permit you to attend AIB.

As with everyone else attending AIB, you are selected by how well you score on AIB and are in competition with all others in that particular trade. You equally may not get selected.

About 30% of RN & RM Officers gained a commission "in service" rising to around 40% in the engineering disciplines.
 

chieftiff

War Hero
Moderator
Ninja_Stoker said:
Yep, just to clarify: a degree on its own is not acceptable:

Ninja_Stoker said:
Why are GCSE & A Levels required when you have a Degree? Because you need to prove a broad-based educational background.

Hope that helps, subject to Chico's verification & good luck.

As mad as this may sound it actually makes perfect sense. It was a long held view by educators that many graduates, whilst obviously not stupid, did not fare well in the big wide world. A fairly recent government review (called the Leitch Review if you want to google it) confirmed this and kicked up some interesting facts like: half of all adults in this country have serious problems with numbers, and 5 million members of the adult workforce are functionally illiterate. A third of those with a degre level education fall into the "problems with numbers" category which is a little worrying and believe it or not a small percentage fall into the "functionally illiterate".

Having basic level 2 qualifications in Maths and English has long been a requirement of the learning sector, even if a teacher has a Masters in Maths he can't complete a PGCE or CertEd without a GCSE in it and English.

The whole education system is about to undergo a big shake up starting from this September with the introduction of a new Qualification and Credit Framework and the introduction of 14-19 Diploma's, hopefully this will pull us back from the precipice of failing skills and productivity. Until that kicks in properly(c 2011) it's a good thing that you need to prove literacy and numeracy as well as academic ability at University level. Even Warfare Officer need to read and write (a bit) :dwarf:
 

Kelborn

Badgeman
Wouldn't it make sense if the Royal Navy, like the Police force had examinations in literacy in numeracy that graduates who didn't have the necessary a levels could take to prove they possessed the necessary skills.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Kelborn said:
Wouldn't it make sense if the Royal Navy, like the Police force had examinations in literacy in numeracy that graduates who didn't have the necessary a levels could take to prove they possessed the necessary skills.

Officers are now tested in numeracy & literacy as part of the initial recruiting test- this is a pass/fail element before AIB, however it still does not replace the need for English & Maths GCSE's (A*-C) & 3 other GCSE's.

The standard for A Levels (which can be any subject) is imminently about to rise, rather than be dispensed with. Someone with a Degree or better can easily gain the (soon to be) 180 UCAS points at AS Level within 9 months if they wish- it often takes longer than that to join anyway, so there's not much point having the A level requirement replaced by a test.

The fact someone has obtained a third in media studies, for example, doesn't mean they can do sums or spell, as we frequently find.
 
180 UCAS points is equiv to:

1x A Level Grade B and 1x A Level Grade C.

Not sure about NVQs etc. but the Merlin UCAS Tariff Calculator is pretty good - you get points for a musical instrument exam pass at Grade 6+ (Don't know if the Navy include that though, and no the pink oboe doesn't count either ;))
 
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