Trade Union Membership

Discussion in 'The Afterlife - Resettlement and Jobs' started by mikh, May 25, 2008.

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  1. Like a lot of ex services my opinion of unions was not a good one and I resisted joining a union for a few years after leaving the mob, I was eventually talked into joining one as the firm I was working for at the time was threatening redundancies, and changes in terms and conditions for those that survived, I managed to survive the redundancy, and the workforce represented by the union managed to keep the terms and conditions of their employment mainly due to the negotiation of the union. Since then I have called on them for assistance on 2 occasions, and on both I have received good advice and support.

    I would therefore recommend that all who are leaving, or who have left the safe confines of service life give consideration to joining a trade union.
     
  2. I do agree with you on the above article. I did my 12 in the andrew and the next 30 as a union rep in civvy street found it very rewarding helping others/giving sound advice and helpful representation :thumright: people will always turn to you when they are in trouble at work /and we will always treat them the same /whether they are in the union or not /p.s. they all seem to join thereafter :thumright:
     
  3. I became a union representative after being requested by the staff to stop a loudmouth doing the job. Later the experience stood me in good stead as I climbed the ladder. The main thing is to be wary about senior union staff with political ambition,
     
  4. I too joined a union when I went into teaching, mainly because the whole of education has so many pits into which one can fall into, not least the aggression displayed by students.

    Really its all to do with preservation, and support if things get snotty.

    I don't agree with 90% of what the union espouse but their legal team are very active, and easily accessed. Taking into consideration the way the College and University teaching contracts are written, you need someone to be able to unpick them for you.

    So yes I feel that the monthly fee although high does give you a warmer feeling.
     


  5. I too felt the same about unions, during and after service. I can remember a friend of mine, an ex servicmen had the same attitude in the late 70s on leaving. He worked for the local Council. At some time they went on strike, or I should say the working force belonging to UCATT. My mate at the time was not a union member, and continued to go into work, because he clocked in and did menial tasks he still got paid is £63 per week. He was married with two kids and a house. The strikers were on about £6 strike pay.

    When I left the Navy, I felt the same until I became a Caretaker of a School (Site Manager). There were many things that one would need the help of a Union Rep, whilst working with children. However, on top of this, the benefits I found such as holiday discounts, travel discounts, and much more.

    Different from the days of my friend.

    Regards, Chris
     
  6. I agree with all the above statements, you are paying your union fees as a form of insurance if you should be the subject of an inquiry or disciplinary hearing. Membership will give you access to legal support etc
     
  7. I've also been a Union member since leaving the Corps. Going to an A.S.L.E.F (Train Drivers Union) meeting for the first time was an eye opener, not so many rabid communists, just people wanting to ensure that staff got a fair deal and that the job remained safe.
    Now in a Local Government Union and although H&S has gone crazy, I'm still promoting Unionism to the younger staff who feel that the contributions they would have to make could be better spent on alcopops or clothes.
    Funnily enough they are very interested to learn how pay negotiations are going and how long it will be before the Union negotiated contract will take to be ratified, so that they can benefit from any new conditions.
    Non Union members were horrified last year when our Branch suggested that Non Union members who accepted Union negotiated pay rates and conditions should make a one off $50 payment to the Union!! Ho Hum.
    NZB
     
  8. Lots of companies don't like Unions or Union Members. So I suggest that
    you don't let them know you are a Union member if you are being employed by a non Union Firm.

    Workers rights now are that to have a union ''shop '' all worker/employees
    must be ballotted and the vote has to have a defined majority in the workforce prior to the company accepting the union and right of access to its members.

    Its not neccesary to join the workforce union if you are a member of a different union --most Trade unions are affiliated to each other.

    Finally--------------yes join a union they are a very good source of industrial and health and safety law updates if ever you need to know anything .
    Management likes to keep the workers uninformed --that way they can get
    the unsuspecting ''workers'' to comply to in-company rules.


    :nemo: :nemo:
     
  9. What makes me pissed off with union reps is when they come back off a weekend away with the union and they boast about how they have had their accomodation and food paid for, and also received £30 a day expenses. Now then, I don't mind paying for them to go away and represent us but I really begrudge paying for their beer as well!.
     
  10. Well when I left in 95, I went straight in to a job with the Local Authority. Everyone was encouraged to join a union and they had a good working relationship with senior officers. I paid my dues for 2 years, benefitted from their negotiations on pay , but didn't need to use them for anything else.

    The local convenor had an office in our building and used to come in to my office each day to collect his mail , so we often had a heads up on what was happening behind the scenes during a very complicated and difficult reorganisation phase. After a while I realised that the job I was in was likely to be phased out and discussed this with the union conveneor. His answer was basically that he would happily sacrifice the position of a manager in the negotiations if it meant keeping manual staff in work. As you can imagine I was not too pleased. I had been paying my dues just like the cleaners, in fact it cost me more due to the % contribution system, and yet I was being cast adrift by the union.

    I cancelled my membership and am no longe3r in a union. I found another, far better, job before that one disappeared and have never looked back.

    I'm not dissing all unions, where I work now I work very closely with the union reps, but I just wouldn't join UNison again and my personal belief is that if your a manager then they won't support you .
     
  11. Left the mob and became a self employed press photographer. Joined the NUJ (mainly to get my hands on a Press Card) but has lots of advantages being a member. Discounts on insurance, courses for 50% off and even discounts on my AppleMacs! Well worth the £3 a month.
     
  12. The Union man told us we are starting a new shift meaning more people employed. Your hours will be reduced. Your wage will be reduced.

    So at the stroke of a Union pen we lost fifteen pounds a week. Not to worry it will be cushioned over the next five years.

    Hang on I think we have to many people working here time for the redundancies. Union man tells us it is the management's job to manage. Then he finds out over a thousand people are losing their jobs. We must stop this he tells us thinking of all those lost subs!!

    To late matey they have all gone and I am gone next week. Bye!!!!

    The Union is only has strong has its workforce I told the shop steward in the last job when he asked me to join the Union. And you lot are a load of shite. So therefore your Union is shite. They would cut there grandmothers throat for a few hours overtime in that shitehole!!

    The shop steward also told me he was on standby long ago for the Falklands with being a first aid man in work. Another WALT in the making!!
     

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