TMU. Confused!

LadyLola

Newbie
Hi all.

This is my first post and concerns my 16yr old son. It may be a long one so hold onto your hats!

I have a mild form of hypermobility condition, and it was declared on his medical form. He does not have it.

As proof of discharge from his paediatricIan for a different condition (not related) we supplied a letter from the paeds doctor. It also said on the letter that my condition had been discussed (he asked me why I was limping) and that he had checked son 'just in case'while he was there. The letter states that son is not hypermobile and has no symptoms of the condition.

It is worth pointing out that son has never seen a doctor for anything to do with the condition, it was an as you're here we'll check type thing. It is not on his medical records anywhere.

We went to the medical today, and the doctor said that Josh was not hypermobile in any way after doing the Beighton test. He then said he should be referred to see a specialist about the condition and was going to declare him TMU.

The diagnostic tool for my condition is the Beighton scale. If the paediatrician has tested him and said he hasn't got it, and the medical doctor has said he isn't hypermobile using the Beighton scale (a big part of having a hypermobility condition!), and he's never seen a GP for the condition, how can he be TMU?

I'm confused at how he now has to wait months for a specialist (there are 5 centers in the country that deal with it with very long waiting lists) to confirm he hasn't got something the medical doctor that's referring him and a paediatrician have said he hasn't got. He has been made TMU for something he doesn't have!!

Any advice would be great and sorry for the rant, (little bit angry and confused by it).

Hope you are all well.
 

fishhead

War Hero
@LadyLola I can understand your frustration but the first thing to do is to maintain an air of confidence that this thing will work itself put. From what I have seen on this forum the issuing of TMUs is a fairly regular occurrence and it is just the appointed doctors, who approve people medically, saying we need to have a little look at the medical record to ensure everything is as reported. It may delay things a little while but because service life can bring special demands on a persons fitness and wellbeing it is best for everyone's sake including your son it is best to let it take it's course.
Good luck to you and your lad
 

LadyLola

Newbie
Thank you @fishhead for your kind reply. You are right and it will work itself out in the end, it is just as you said, very frustrating for all of us. When we thought through any potential sticky points this never came into it!!
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
The Beighton Test is indeed the definitive measure used my the service to determine medical suitability with regard hypermobility.

The likely reason your son is TMU is probably because a declared prior medical history relating to the condition needs to be checked-out/verified in order to confirm it is entirely as stated as suggested by @fishhead. I know nothing of the medical specifics but am aware it is sometimes a hereditary condition and the medical examiner is obligated to check.
 

LadyLola

Newbie
OK, thanks @Ninja_Stoker. As I said in my initial post Son has never been to the doctors for anything to do with the condition so there will be nothing to find there, and the paeds doctor has said in his letter that he hasn't got it. I can understand that there has to be an amount of verification when it comes to health issues, as he is signing up for a career and lifestyle, not a job at the local supermarket. I did think though that a doctors letter and the fact that two doctors didn't find him hypermobile in any way would be enough.

Probably a bit of panic on my part, and maybe a little guilt as it's my condition that has halted his application.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
OK, thanks @Ninja_Stoker. As I said in my initial post Son has never been to the doctors for anything to do with the condition so there will be nothing to find there, and the paeds doctor has said in his letter that he hasn't got it. I can understand that there has to be an amount of verification when it comes to health issues, as he is signing up for a career and lifestyle, not a job at the local supermarket. I did think though that a doctors letter and the fact that two doctors didn't find him hypermobile in any way would be enough.

Probably a bit of panic on my part, and maybe a little guilt as it's my condition that has halted his application.
To be honest, from what you describe, it just sounds like a belt & braces approach. The contracted Docs are under pressure to get it right by the service, so although many think they profit from it, they don't but they are taken to task if they make the wrong call.

No-one's fault particularly, certainly not yours but the frustration is genuinely appreciated. The delays drive the recruiters nuts too ;)
 
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