Tjipetir mystery: Why are rubber-like blocks washing up on beaches?

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#1
An article here on the BBC Website:



BBC said:
For the past few years, 100-year-old rubber-like blocks from Indonesia have been mysteriously washing up on beaches in the UK and northern Europe. The Titanic has been suggested as one of the possible sources - but now a beachcomber says she may have solved the puzzle of the Tjipetir blocks.
Full dit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-30043875

Thinking about this still further - if these blocks lay undisturbed for 99 years & have only recently started to appear - the question is: Are the salvage company liable for pollution ... AND - What else was there on the wreck that made it necessary to rip it apart? Is it a War Grave?

http://www.uboat.net/wwi/ships_hit/4187.html
 

muppet42

Lantern Swinger
#2
I was amazed that the rubber blocks had lasted this long!

There was another story somewhere recently about a yank merchant vessel packed full of 1500 mules that was sunk not far off the coast in 1916 I believe. I was surprised anyone was interested in salvaging that, not sure what you'd do with that many donkey bones.

Isn't there a lot of concern, in certain circles, regarding the fuel of wrecks?
 
#3
I was amazed that the rubber blocks had lasted this long!

Isn't there a lot of concern, in certain circles, regarding the fuel of wrecks?
There certainly has been concern. Enough for MOD to place a contract for heavy fuel oil to be removed from the wreck of HMS Royal Oak, sunk by German U-boat at Scapa in 1939. Oil had been leaking into Scapa Flow for many years.
Re the WW1 Japanese wreck, Ninja Stoker's point about whether salvage companies could be liable for pollution is interesting and could help put food in the mouths of lawyers' starving children......

What about the liability of countries involved in sinking ships? Mmmmmmm, more food on the lawyers' tables!
 

Sumo

War Hero
#4
I was amazed that the rubber blocks had lasted this long!

There was another story somewhere recently about a yank merchant vessel packed full of 1500 mules that was sunk not far off the coast in 1916 I believe. I was surprised anyone was interested in salvaging that, not sure what you'd do with that many donkey bones.

Isn't there a lot of concern, in certain circles, regarding the fuel of wrecks?
It is cheaper to scrap and recycle than to dig the Ore out of the ground, and old ships of that vintage would have been Iron rich, so maybe not as mad as it first looks.
 

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