The verbing of nouns

#23
Not a noun I know but the present use of the word 'get' gets me.
eg. 'Can I get a latte' or 'We got to go to the cinema' etc.
That little lot can be exported straight back where it came from on the other side of the pond asap.
It is even used on the BBC by some of the daft tarts who pretend to be newreaders.
 
#24
sussex2 said:
Not a noun I know but the present use of the word 'get' gets me.
eg. 'Can I get a latte' (whatever one of those is) or 'We got to go to the cinema' etc.
That little lot can be exported straight back where it came from on the other side of the pond asap.
It is even used on the BBC by some of the daft tarts who pretend to be newreaders.
Oh yes, and the use of ass instead of the good old fashioned arse.
Strange I don't seem to like many things which have wandered eastward across the Atlantic.
 
#25
bumblebee said:
Passed-over_Loggie said:
"Regularised" is one that tends to grip mine. These things seem to migrate Eastwards from that great land mass in the West (no, not Ireland, that other place).

Forgive the thread drift but I have a constant battle trying to keep the word "transportation" out of our various documents (sometimes known as documentation!) when transport is the perfectly normal and adequate Noun or Verb. Many years ago, in the quest for the paperless office, there was a, now long gashed, Site notice requiring the "digitization" of permanent records.

Keep up the crusade!
Digitization--That's execrable.
Execrable? That's sh...y!
 

ronalder

Lantern Swinger
#27
Apollonia said:
Hello! I just popped over from arrse to see what was going on and I think you might appreciate one of my favourite cartoons:

I was once asked by a "Human Resources person" (-- you know the ones we knew as Welfare ) if I could 'ballpark' something. That was about 15 years ago and I still ain't sure what she meant.
 
#30
From the FLEET Transformation Website

The demand for personnel from the Customer (in all its various guises as employers of Naval Service personnel) initiates the pull-through from the manpower supply base via a process of recruitment followed by ‘navalisation’, specialisation, ‘platformisation’ and subsequent ‘competence uplift’ training .
For those of you who speak English, it is talking about training RN/RM people:

'Manpower Supply Base' is the civilian population
'Navalisation' means training them to be sailors
'Platformisation' means giving them training for certain types of ship or aircraft.

:roll:
 
#31
TattooDog said:
From the FLEET Transformation Website

The demand for personnel from the Customer (in all its various guises as employers of Naval Service personnel) initiates the pull-through from the manpower supply base via a process of recruitment followed by ‘navalisation’, specialisation, ‘platformisation’ and subsequent ‘competence uplift’ training .
For those of you who speak English, it is talking about training RN/RM people:

'Manpower Supply Base' is the civilian population
'Navalisation' means training them to be sailors
'Platformisation' means giving them training for certain types of ship or aircraft.

:roll:
That's Adrian for you These Cornish trying to sound superior>
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#32
The irony of this painful drivel is that one of the current catchphrases is, wait for it, "Regional Coherency"

The demand for personnel from the Customer (in all its various guises as employers of Naval Service personnel) initiates the pull-through from the manpower supply base via a process of recruitment followed by ‘navalisation’, specialisation, ‘platformisation’ and subsequent ‘competence uplift’ training .
The whole sentence could simply be written as:

"The Royal Navy aims to recruit sufficient numbers of civilians which it then trains, in 3 phases, to become competent sailors."

But why use 21 words when you can use twice as many and confuse the unwary?

You will notice the Royal Navy hasn't won many "Crystal Clear" awards for plain English.
 
#36
Plain English?
Adrian, our beloved 2SL, comes from Redruth in Cornwall.

Plain English? Cornise if he, presumably, has anything to do with it. You'm ok then me luvver. Not a noun verbalised
 
#37
One that gets my goat: leverage (as in "I leveraged my knowledge to solve the problem"). Hate it. Another that is "doing the rounds" is "learnings", as in "we have to take the learnings from that mission and leverage them next time". Aaaarrrrggggh!
 
#38
OSLO said:
One that gets my goat: leverage (as in "I leveraged my knowledge to solve the problem"). Hate it. Another that is "doing the rounds" is "learnings", as in "we have to take the learnings from that mission and leverage them next time". Aaaarrrrggggh!
First class examples I join you with Ouch! It really is unecessarilly painful and pretentious. Ouch! again
 
#40
"The minuites of the last commitee meeting have been CIRCULARIZED".

WhenI got mine they were printed in straight lines on A4 paper, I was very disapointed .

Whats wrong with "circulated"??
 

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