The Totally Useless Infomation Thread...

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#7
Paper money is not made from wood pulp but from cotton. This means that it will not disintegrate as fast if it is put in the laundry.
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#8
A frog can't empty its stomach by vomitting. To empty its stomach contents, a frog throws up it's stomach first, so the stomach is dangling out of it's mouth. Then the frog uses its forearms to dig out all of the stomach's contents and then swallows the stomach back down again.
 
#9
sgtpepperband said:
A frog can't empty its stomach by vomitting. To empty its stomach contents, a frog throws up it's stomach first, so the stomach is dangling out of it's mouth. Then the frog uses its forearms to dig out all of the stomach's contents and then swallows the stomach back down again.




that just gross!!!!
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#10
brazenhussy said:
...that just gross!!!!...
Nope, you're wrong. A 'gross' is equal to a dozen dozen, i.e. 12 × 12 = 144.

It can be used in duodecimal counting.

The term is often used in commercial contexts implying a quantity of 144 items. A count of 1728 or a dozen gross equals a great gross. Though a gross is often said to mean simply "144", it is subject to the usage rules for a unit, as opposed to those for numbers:

a. it is always preceded by an article or a number;
b. when the preceding word is a number, it often implies multiplication rather than combining that number of separate counts, e.g. "two gross" can refer equally to a single container into which 288 items were counted, or to a pair of containers into each of which 144 were counted;
c. normally (i.e., save for in situations justifying extreme brevity), specifying the kind of objects being counted may not be done by positioning the kind directly following "gross", but requires that the word "of" intervene, e.g. "288 apples", but "two gross of apples".

Its common abbreviations are either "gr" or "gro".

:thumright:
 
#11
sgtpepperband said:
brazenhussy said:
...that just gross!!!!...
Nope, you're wrong. A 'gross' is equal to a dozen dozen, i.e. 12 × 12 = 144.

It can be used in duodecimal counting.

The term is often used in commercial contexts implying a quantity of 144 items. A count of 1728 or a dozen gross equals a great gross. Though a gross is often said to mean simply "144", it is subject to the usage rules for a unit, as opposed to those for numbers:

a. it is always preceded by an article or a number;
b. when the preceding word is a number, it often implies multiplication rather than combining that number of separate counts, e.g. "two gross" can refer equally to a single container into which 288 items were counted, or to a pair of containers into each of which 144 were counted;
c. normally (i.e., save for in situations justifying extreme brevity), specifying the kind of objects being counted may not be done by positioning the kind directly following "gross", but requires that the word "of" intervene, e.g. "288 apples", but "two gross of apples".

Its common abbreviations are either "gr" or "gro".

:thumright:
Sorry for poking my nose in BH, but that up there was without doubt THE most BORING post i've ever seen.
Anywhere.
:thumright:
 
#15
The giant red star Betelgeuse has a diameter larger than that of the Earth's orbit around the sun.


(Anyone want a link to one of those boring websites that you can't stop reading :rambo: )
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#20
brazenhussy said:
The continents names all end with the same letter with which they start...
Incorrect: Antarctica, Europe, Africa, Australia and Asia do. But the Americas are two different continents, so North America (starts with 'N' ends in 'A') and South America (starts with 'S' ends in 'A') do not apply.
 

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