The sensitive RNR

#1
Knowing little of the RNR today. it seemed appropriate for me to acquaint myself.
Well.

Obfuscation prevails.
What is the RNR and what useful service does it provide?
Deck Sentries seems to be it. Not even sure what they are .
Anyone explaining will be most welcome.
 
#2
Before we get round to that Norman, what about the piccie of your beautiful daughter? Then perhaps we can proceed with another of your highly intelligent questions, for someone who infers that he spent a long time in the Andrew, your lack of knowledge amazes me.

Take care

in the meantime, post the picture.
 
#3
higthepig said:
Before we get round to that Norman, what about the piccie of your beautiful daughter? Then perhaps we can proceed with another of your highly intelligent questions, for someone who infers that he spent a long time in the Andrew, your lack of knowledge amazes me.

Take care

in the meantime, post the picture.
Is this person all there?
 
#5
bumblebee said:
Knowing little of the RNR today. it seemed appropriate for me to acquaint myself.
Well.

Obfuscation prevails.
What is the RNR and what useful service does it provide?
Deck Sentries seems to be it. Not even sure what they are .
Anyone explaining will be most welcome.
Simplest answer is we provide whatever the RN requires of us. Logistics (ops and ex), abovewater force protection and (a new one) underwater force protection,MTO, NCAGS, Media ops, Intelliegence, Submariners, trained flight crews, FTRS (Full time reserve service) filling billets which the RN is unable to.

The remit under which we operate is "to provide trained manpower to support the fleet in times of Crisis, stretch and war".

Does that clear the muddied waters any?

Jesse
 
#6
jesse650 said:
bumblebee said:
Knowing little of the RNR today. it seemed appropriate for me to acquaint myself.
Well.

Obfuscation prevails.
What is the RNR and what useful service does it provide?
Deck Sentries seems to be it. Not even sure what they are .
Anyone explaining will be most welcome.
Simplest answer is we provide whatever the RN requires of us. Logistics (ops and ex), abovewater force protection and (a new one) underwater force protection,MTO, NCAGS, Media ops, Intelliegence, Submariners, trained flight crews, FTRS (Full time reserve service) filling billets which the RN is unable to.

The remit under which we operate is "to provide trained manpower to support the fleet in times of Crisis, stretch and war".

Does that clear the muddied waters any?

Jesse
Thank you for that. Why not enrol more sailors. I understand in times of war manpower is in short supply but in peace-time recruit more regular sailors. Is it the case that whilst there are numerous RNR recruits fewer wish to join full-time. Why?
 
#7
Both the RNR and regular service aren't getting sufficient numbers of recruits. According to the National Audit Office the Navy is currently 6,000 sailors short of full strength.
 
#9
bumblebee said:
Knowing little of the RNR today. it seemed appropriate for me to acquaint myself.
Well.

Obfuscation prevails.
What is the RNR and what useful service does it provide?
Deck Sentries seems to be it. Not even sure what they are .
Anyone explaining will be most welcome.
READ, then Shut the F**K up.
(Source: http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/server/show/nav.2718)

Royal Naval Reserve


The Royal Naval Reserve (RNR) is an integral part of Britain's naval forces, comprising a corps of some 3,250 men and women who train in peacetime to enable the Royal Navy to meet its operational commitments in times of stretch, crisis, tension and war. Although some 25% of RNR personnel have previously served in the Royal Navy, the majority are volunteers drawn from all walks of life, together with a small number of qualified Merchant Navy deck officers, civilian medical practitioners and nurses.
For most branches, training is conducted in one of 13 RNR Units across the UK some of which have now sprouted 'satellite' divisions in other major towns in naval training establishments and in HM Ships world-wide. For Defence Intelligence Service and Interrogator branches, training is administered from HMS Ferret at Chicksands, Bedfordshire (contact via Director Naval Reserves. Tel No: 023 9272 7679).
The broad training requirements are set by RN organisations responsible for the operational tasking of the respective branches. Training courses and documentation are provided by the relevant RN training schools. Basic training is provided at HMS Raleigh, Torpoint, Cornwall, for ratings and at the Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, Devon, for officers; both these and most other RNR courses are of 2 weeks duration or less.
Once Officers and Ratings have completed foundation and branch training, they are considered to have joined the Trained Strength of the RNR. Prior to this, they will have served as Midshipmen (age 17-20) or Sub-Lieutenants (age 20+). Thereafter promotion is by selection to Lieutenant Commander* (Major/Squadron leader equivalent), Commander (Lieutenant-Colonel/Wing Commander ) and Captain (Colonel/Group Captain). The highest appointment is the Commodore RNR (Brigadier/Air Commodore).
The Ratings' structure is equally competitive and rewarding. Once part of the trained strength, RNR Junior Ratings compete for promotion to Leading Hand (Corporal equivalent), Petty Officer (Sergeant) and Chief Petty Officer (Colour/Staff or Flight Sergeant). Some may achieve the top rank of Warrant Officer introduced in 2003. Opportunities exist for all Ratings to earn promotion to the commissioned ranks and most RNR Officers have risen up this way.
* Subject to level of professional qualifications, Medical Officers join as either Surgeon Lieutenants or Surgeon Lieutenant Commanders and promotion to the latter is not subject to the normal selection process.

Jobs/Roles
Rating

Seaman

No specific experience/qualifications required. As a Seaman, you will become one of the most valuable and versatile members of the Royal Navy Reserves. Your main responsibility will be to protect ships against terrorist or other threats, both in harbour and at sea. You will be trained in weapon handling, seamanship, firefighting, nuclear, biological and chemical defence (NBCD), helicopter operations and the ship protection organisation.
You will work in 12-person teams and train as an independently deployable force led by a Chief Petty Officer. In your team, you may be moved at short notice to supplement Royal Navy ships’ companies or merchant navy ships, where you would work closely with Amphibious Operations Officers and Navigators. You may also support the mine countermeasures battlestaff and have the opportunity to train as Mine Warfare Operations Specialists.
Diver Underwater Force Protection
Open to personnel who hold either a military, police or recognised civilian diving qualification. Entry will normally be at Rating level with the exception of those ex-Royal Navy Officers who hold military diving qualifications. Entrants will be subject to a full Service diving medical and an assessment weekend prior to being admitted to the specialisation. As an Underwater Force Protection Diver, you will be trained to air dive to 21 metres as part of a specialist diving team. Full diving training on Service diving equipment will be given and you will be required to keep your diving skills up to date at weekends. Teams may frequently deploy outside the UK. The role will primarily involve underwater searches and minor repair work.

Logistics
Excellent logistical support is vital in order for the Royal Navy to function effectively.
As part of the Logistics specialisation, you will be responsible for ensuring that everything the Royal Navy needs to do its job is there at the right time, such as food, supplies and administrative support. This is a crucial role, as the Royal Navy operates in an unpredictable environment under challenging conditions. You are likely to find yourself in a variety of environments manning advanced logistics support sites, forward logistics sites and Headquarters units. You will be trained to take charge in a Logistics Headquarters and sites at forward locations, to ensure that maritime forces get the support they need from ashore, which means controlling the movement of personnel, mail and cargo.
In recent years the Logistics specialisation has been at the forefront of innovation and
transition within the Royal Navy Reserves. This is a specialisation with a global commitment and all the posts are interesting and demanding. We need people with self-discipline, leadership, integrity and a strong team ethic. You will need to be able to communicate clearly and have the confidence and personality to be able to liaise
with a host of agencies and representatives.

Submarine Operations
You will be part of a team that is responsible for the tasking of submarines and their safety. You can expect to carry out these roles in either a NATO shore headquarters in the UK, Europe or North America, or in a command ship in the Submarine Advisory Team, which may include support to Cruise missile operations.

Information Operations
Ex-Royal Navy or transfers from other Royal Navy Reserves branches if you have skills in the appropriate areas, such as PR, media or journalism. Media Operations has two main functions: to train the Royal Navy to deal with the media, and to provide guidance and support to the Royal Navy in situations where the media are involved. You will need a high degree of flexibility and should be comfortable with briefing and advising Senior Officers. You will need to be able to think on your feet and demonstrate versatile communication skills.

Operational Intelligence
You will need proven fluency (diploma, degree or near-native speaker standard) in one of the core languages (Arabic, Farsi/Dari, Pashtu, Serbo-Croat, French and Spanish), but other languages are considered. We can take Direct Entry with relevant qualifications.
You will work as an interpreter or debriefer in the UK or abroad and will receive specialist intelligence training to work on current operations.

C4ISR (CIS)
As a Rating, you will be trained in military communications systems and procedures, on ships at sea and at command headquarters ashore. This is a challenging and rewarding career in the vital roles associated with communications and information systems. You will be using the latest communication technologies to convey battlespace information from the front line to command.

Air
The Royal Navy Reserves Air Branch covers all branches and trades of the Fleet Air Arm: Pilots, Observers, aircrewmen, ground crew, Aircraft Controllers, Fighter Controllers, Air Traffic Controllers, met forecasters and meteorological forecasters and observers, Mobile Air Operations Teams, engineering and technical personnel, firecrews and flight deck crews. You will be working with the Royal Navy’s air force, which could involve transporting troops, combat, or assisting in a medical evacuation.

Medical
Rank on entry will be dependent on qualifications and experience, as assessed by the Medical Director-General (Royal Navy). Experience/requirements: You will need to have a medical background, as outlined below.
The Royal Navy Reserves Medical Branch recruits qualified medical practitioners – especially surgeons and anaesthetists – and adultqualified first-level nurses registered on Parts 1 (RN1/RNA) of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Register who make up Queen Alexandra’s Royal Naval Nursing Service (Reserves) (QARNNS(R)).
QARNNS(R) has opportunities for a small number of Nursing Officers as well as a larger cadre of Naval Nurse Ratings, including those with experience or specialist qualifications in intensive care, accident and emergency, orthopaedics and surgery. There will be a few openings for Medical Technicians.
As part of the Medical Branch, you will be trained to man ships that receive casualties in a crisis or war situation, as well as forming surgical support teams. You will have a crucial role in providing medical care in demanding situations.

Officer
Amphibious Officer

Merchant navy officers, ex-Royal Navy Warfare Officers and others experienced in the maritime sector. Working on Royal Navy and merchant navy ships, you would help plan an amphibious operation. This involves getting people from land to sea and vice versa to wherever they are needed in the world. Specialised Royal Navy and chartered merchant vessels combine to provide the sealift capability to deploy 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines worldwide, in support of Britain’s interests.
As an Officer, you will be trained to act as an adviser to merchant shipmasters and to inform Task Group commanders about merchant ship operations. You will also work closely with Royal Marines Commandos in the planning and execution of ship-toshore operations.

Mine Warfare
As Junior Officers, you will train at sea in mine countermeasures vessels learning the capabilities and tactics involved in minehunting and diving before learning more specialist skills. Your primary role will involve being trained to augment the Royal Navy’s mine countermeasures battlestaff. You will also act as watchkeepers during operational deployments.

Diver Underwater Force Protection
Open to personnel who hold either a military, police or recognised civilian diving qualification. Entry will normally be at Rating level with the exception of those ex-Royal Navy Officers who hold military diving qualifications. Entrants will be subject to a full Service diving medical and an assessment weekend prior to being admitted to the specialisation. As an Underwater Force Protection Diver, you will be trained to air dive to 21 metres as part of a specialist diving team. Full diving training on Service diving equipment will be given and you will be required to keep your diving skills up to date at weekends. Teams may frequently deploy outside the UK. The role will primarily involve underwater searches and minor repair work.

Logistics
Excellent logistical support is vital in order for the Royal Navy to function effectively.
As part of the Logistics specialisation, you will be responsible for ensuring that everything the Royal Navy needs to do its job is there at the right time, such as food, supplies and administrative support. This is a crucial role, as the Royal Navy operates in an unpredictable environment under challenging conditions. You are likely to find yourself in a variety of environments manning advanced logistics support sites, forward logistics sites and Headquarters units. You will be trained to take charge in a Logistics Headquarters and sites at forward locations, to ensure that maritime forces get the support they need from ashore, which means controlling the movement of personnel, mail and cargo.
In recent years the Logistics specialisation has been at the forefront of innovation and transition within the Royal Navy Reserves. This is a specialisation with a global commitment and all the posts are interesting and demanding. We need people with self-discipline, leadership, integrity and a strong team ethic. You will need to be able to communicate clearly and have the confidence and personality to be able to liaise with a host of agencies and representatives.

Submarine Operations
You will be part of a team that is responsible for the tasking of submarines and their safety. You can expect to carry out these roles in either a NATO shore headquarters in the UK, Europe or North America, or in a command ship in the Submarine Advisory Team, which may include support to Cruise missile operations.

Maritime Trade Operations
Based largely around NCAGS (Naval Cooperation and Guidance for Shipping) and AWNIS (Allied Worldwide Navigational Information System) the UK MTO Organisation exists to enhance the safety of merchant shipping through close cooperation between the military and the shipping industry. NCAGS is the term applied to the measures aimed at protecting maritime trade. AWNIS provides a complete navigational safety information service to military and merchant shipping. MTO is open to both Officers & Ratings. Although not essential, past experience in the RN or Merchant Navy is a distinct advantage.

Media Operations
Ex-Royal Navy or transfers from other Royal Navy Reserves branches if you have skills in the appropriate areas, such as PR, media or journalism. Media Operations has two main functions: to train the Royal Navy to deal with the media, and to provide guidance and support to the Royal Navy in situations where the media are involved. You will need a high degree of flexibility and should be comfortable with briefing and advising Senior Officers. You will need to be able to think on your feet and demonstrate versatile communication skills.

Information Operations
Information operations are military actions that are designed to shape perceptions and influence the will, capability and understanding of a target audience in support of the commander’s campaign plan. This may involve reassuring a civilian population, disrupting a supply chain, deterring aggression, destroying a key military target, defeating an adversary or persuading them to surrender. This relies on thorough intelligence and robust, secure and reliable communications. You will work with personnel in Electronic Warfare, Psychological Operations, Operational Security, Operational Deception, Media Operations, Civil Military Co-operation and Physical Destruction.
Reservists with a civilian background in advertising, sales and marketing or PR are ideally suited to this specialisation but anybody with the right motivation can join.

Operational Intelligence
Successful military operations are founded on effective intelligence. The role of operational Intelligence is to provide the operational commander with the fullest possible understanding of the adversary and the operational environment, in order that their staff can plan and conduct operations successfully. Your role will involve producing assessments of adversary capabilities and intentions, in order to gain insight into how to exploit vulnerabilities and counter adversary actions.

Defence intelligence
Broad naval or other military experience (Regular or Reserve forces), particularly those with specialist technical, geographical or cultural knowledge or with previous experience within the intelligence community. Defence Intelligence Officers collate and analyse sensitive information from a number of sources to compile highly classified reports and briefings that will advise and inform military and political decision makers.
They will continue this process throughout the operation to ensure that those serving on operations are kept up to date. All Officers in this branch are managed by the staff of HMS Ferret.

Air
The Royal Navy Reserves Air Branch covers all branches and trades of the Fleet Air Arm: Pilots, Observers, aircrewmen, ground crew, Aircraft Controllers, Fighter Controllers, Air Traffic Controllers, met forecasters and meteorological forecasters and observers, Mobile Air Operations Teams, engineering and technical personnel, firecrews and flight deck crews. You will be working with the Royal Navy’s air force, which could involve transporting troops, combat, or assisting in a medical evacuation.

Medical
Rank on entry will be dependent on qualifications and experience, as assessed by the Medical Director-General (Royal Navy).
Experience/requirements: You will need to have a medical background, as outlined below.
The Royal Navy Reserves Medical Branch recruits qualified medical practitioners – especially surgeons and anaesthetists – and adult qualified first-level nurses registered on Parts 1 (RN1/RNA) of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Register who make up Queen Alexandra’s Royal Naval Nursing Service (Reserves) (QARNNS(R)).
QARNNS(R) has opportunities for a small number of Nursing Officers as well as a larger cadre of Naval Nurse Ratings, including those with experience or specialist qualifications in intensive care, accident and emergency, orthopaedics and surgery. There will be a few openings for Medical Technicians.
As part of the Medical Branch, you will be trained to man ships that receive casualties in a crisis or war situation, as well as forming surgical support teams. You will have a crucial role in providing medical care in demanding situations.

Chaplain
You will already be a priest or minister. Royal Navy Reserves Chaplains are an integral part of the Royal Naval Chaplaincy Service (RNCS) – trained to deploy, both at sea and ashore, in support of their full-time colleagues in the Royal Navy. You will provide effective spiritual and pastoral care to the Fleet during peace and war, and may also offer spiritual and pastoral care to the men and women of the Royal Navy Reserves Unit to which you are attached.
 
#10
bumblebee said:
jesse650 said:
bumblebee said:
Knowing little of the RNR today. it seemed appropriate for me to acquaint myself.
Well.

Obfuscation prevails.
What is the RNR and what useful service does it provide?
Deck Sentries seems to be it. Not even sure what they are .
Anyone explaining will be most welcome.
Simplest answer is we provide whatever the RN requires of us. Logistics (ops and ex), abovewater force protection and (a new one) underwater force protection,MTO, NCAGS, Media ops, Intelliegence, Submariners, trained flight crews, FTRS (Full time reserve service) filling billets which the RN is unable to.

The remit under which we operate is "to provide trained manpower to support the fleet in times of Crisis, stretch and war".

Does that clear the muddied waters any?

Jesse
Thank you for that. Why not enrol more sailors. I understand in times of war manpower is in short supply but in peace-time recruit more regular sailors. Is it the case that whilst there are numerous RNR recruits fewer wish to join full-time. Why?
Afraid I still don't understand. If recruiting for the RN and RNR is so difficult, Who is asking themselves why. A problem somewhere. Mind you I would be reluctant to join a service that is overburdened with Senior Officers.Promotion prospects are clearly limited.
 
#11
Norma

When you produce the brief in her briefs, this talented, hard working fruit of your loins then and only then may we take you seriously. Till then **** OFF.

Nutty
 
#12
letthecatoutofthebag said:
bumblebee said:
Knowing little of the RNR today. it seemed appropriate for me to acquaint myself.
Well.

Obfuscation prevails.
What is the RNR and what useful service does it provide?
Deck Sentries seems to be it. Not even sure what they are .
Anyone explaining will be most welcome.
Perhaps, given you obviously have internet access, you could take a look at the RN website (can't be bothered to put the link, try google) and have a look at the RNR section.

Failing that call one of the RNR Units, I think they're in the Yellow Pages...

Failing that you could read the answers in your other thread...
Done all that. Still unsure. What do they actually do save talk about it?
 

TF110

Lantern Swinger
#13
The reason the RNR exists is that a lot of the jobs mentioned need such small schemes of complement (ie 20 or 30 people) that the RN does not need to maintain them on a full time basis - merely a dormant capability in times of stretch or tension. The RNR provides that at low cost compared to maintaining thousands of extra personnel to do niche roles in career dead ends.

Quite clear that norm knows nothing - how soon before he moans about the numbers of senior officers?
 
#15
For your info. The RNR are just like you except we all have proper jobs as well. A lot of us are ex RN and needed a change of scenery but not a complete change. A lot of the younger ones are joining as a tester to see if they would like to do the job permanently. The reason you think that the RNR only provide "Deck Guards" is because that is the only time you see a bunch of RNRs as a"Unit". Your Dad probably thought that all the RNR did was crew some old MCMVs and take them to sea for week end jollies. We have always been much more than a single task organisation. Some thing that makes us rather different to the bulk of the TA and RAuxAF.

If you have not already been told, the Reserves used to regard the RN as the Custodians of the Navy. That is, people that looked after it for us in Peace Time. So the Navy would be ready for us when things got sticky.

For that I thank you!

DI,,(A Very Insensitive RNR)
 
#17
Bumblebee_is_Nuts! said:
bumblebee said:
Diver Underwater Force Protection
Open to personnel who hold either a military, police or recognised civilian diving qualification. Entry will normally be at Rating level with the exception of those ex-Royal Navy Officers who hold military diving qualifications. Entrants will be subject to a full Service diving medical and an assessment weekend prior to being admitted to the specialisation. As an Underwater Force Protection Diver, you will be trained to air dive to 21 metres as part of a specialist diving team. Full diving training on Service diving equipment will be given and you will be required to keep your diving skills up to date at weekends. Teams may frequently deploy outside the UK. The role will primarily involve underwater searches and minor repair work.
I'm in the process of joining the RNR and was wondering what people's thoughts were on the Underwater Force Protection role.

I'm an experienced diver (sports diving, not commercial or military) and have been told by both the recruiting officer and the CO of my local unit (Rosyth) that after initial training that the Diver Underwater Force Protection role could well be an option for me with my experience.

I used tyo be in the TA (pre September 11th) and often found that a lot of the specialisation training, although in theory available to TA troops, was really, really hard to get. Is this the case in the RNR now?

Does anyone have any expereince of RN/RNR diving roles? Do you know what the medical involves? I am very fit and healthy, but I don;t have 20/20 vision, would this affeect my chances of getting on the DUFP training?

Any information, comments, opinions etc would be really useful and much appreciated

Thanks
 
#18
I'm in the process of joining the RNR and was wondering what people's thoughts were on the Underwater Force Protection role.

Get a life. The RNR are a waste of space. We could procure a couple of good ships with the money wasted on those losers, whatever branch they think they serve. Tossers.
 

mazza_magoo

Lantern Swinger
#19
nelsons_blood said:
I'm in the process of joining the RNR and was wondering what people's thoughts were on the Underwater Force Protection role.

Get a life. The RNR are a waste of space. We could procure a couple of good ships with the money wasted on those losers, whatever branch they think they serve. Tossers.
are you related to norman? twat.
 
#20
nelsons_blood said:
I'm in the process of joining the RNR and was wondering what people's thoughts were on the Underwater Force Protection role.

Get a life. The RNR are a waste of space. We could procure a couple of good ships with the money wasted on those losers, whatever branch they think they serve. Tossers.
:toilet: :toilet:
 

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