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The Rwandan Genocide - 1994

I think the DJ was put on trial for something along the lines of this, also his brother was a high ranking officer in the Hutu army.
 
Dear Jenny,

A book which I can recommend on Rwanda is Philip Gourevitch's We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families: Stories from Rwanda. Its very good on the origins of the conflict and the part played by the colonial experience as well as the actual events.

Re interventions in general - phew - seems to me we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. What stability we have in Europe was fought for over centuries and since I started studying history I've never understood why we think that short-term artificial external intervention is a solution. We all know that trade is the usual motivator in these issues these days which probably explains why transitory solutions are favoured by here-today-gone-tomorrow politicians. There's the bleeding heart element too due to the emotive power of words and images of suffering, the power of the media. Many people now talk about the advisability of stopping all external intervention, this being the only way for a society to sort out its problems, mind you ending external economic interference would be a good idea too and I can't imagine that happening very soon.
 
golden_rivet said:
Re interventions in general - phew - seems to me we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. What stability we have in Europe was fought for over centuries and since I started studying history I've never understood why we think that short-term artificial external intervention is a solution. We all know that trade is the usual motivator in these issues these days which probably explains why transitory solutions are favoured by here-today-gone-tomorrow politicians. There's the bleeding heart element too due to the emotive power of words and images of suffering, the power of the media. Many people now talk about the advisability of stopping all external intervention, this being the only way for a society to sort out its problems, mind you ending external economic interference would be a good idea too and I can't imagine that happening very soon.

I think the lock the door and walk away approach is really only valid if the outside world has not contributed to the problems. In countries such as Rwanda and many others disparate tribal/ethnic/cultural groupings were brought together to form colonies in the name of empire and later in the name of decolonisation. We have this fixation on the prteervation of existing national boundaries rather than attempting to find the natural divisions that will form stable communities. To a large extent this is based in the now outdated ownership on a nation by a king/queen etc relegating the people to the status of shattels. Now that we do recognise the concept of nationhood as something vested in the people rather than a monarch perhaps we need to consult more with the people about how they actually se theri nation. In my view the concept of maitaining colonial boundaries in a post colonial world is always goinig to hold the potential for disaster, and this is not just a non European problem, we have recently witnessed the death throws of the Serbian Empire, and at the same time seen the peaceful separation of the post Austro Hungarian Empire state of Czechoslovakia. Sovereignty rests with the people and no people have the right of lordship over another people.
 

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