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The Legends that make the Navy what it is!

Speaking of GIs and Dartmouth.. Anyone remember a Chief GI at BRNC in the early 80's called Jones I think. His claim to fame was the now apocryphal incident where he was having a tough time on the Parade Ground with a class of our International brethren. His mood was not helped when a pair of Wren Os tripped daintly down the ramps, giggling. Whereupon he spun round and said "Its all right for you two, you've only got one c**t each to look after, I've got 26 down here...." The story has it that he was not a Chief for much longer...

I believe that was Chief GI Dimmond and the year was 1979. As I recall it, he was used to explain to Mids that they could stand with their feet further apart when at ease and not to worry about dropping their balls because they were safe in a bag. Unfortunately not thinking about the make up of the squad he was drilliing on the fateful day, he came out with the line at the top of his voice forgetting that there were a pair of Wrenos in the squad. He was overheard by the Commander through an open window and was soon a killik gunner.
 
Does anyone remember the Marine Colour Sergeant who used to take the Baby Tiffs for their R and IT training at Cardinham? Welsh chap, had one of his fingers missing and was famous for the retort.....
"Colours....COLOURS....What am I a FUCKIN' rrrrrainbow?"
 
jetnoise said:
Does anyone remember the Marine Colour Sergeant who used to take the Baby Tiffs for their R and IT training at Cardinham? Welsh chap, had one of his fingers missing and was famous for the retort.....
"Colours....COLOURS....What am I a FUCKIN' rrrrrainbow?"

Obviously passed from one Colour Sergeant to another.
I remember CSgt Blackmore (6ft 19" of the epitome of Royal) at Dartmouth in 1979 using the same phrase.
I'm sure most of the "dits" used by GI's were taught at Excellent.
Remember FCGI MCCauley's introduction on our first day on the Parade Ground:
"I am FCPO MCauley, the senior parade training instructor and this is MY parade ground.
While you are on my parade ground, because I am the senior parade training instructor, you will call me SIR.
Because you are wearing the uniform of an 'hofficer' in Her Majesty's Royal Navy, I will call you sir.
The only difference being - you will mean it!"
 
Lt Andrews RN, was the Gunnery Officer known as "shovelface" and like all Gunnery staff its just a act on the Parade Ground. Incidently he was also respected for being a excellent and well liked Divisional Officer.
 
Mess dinner at Dartmouth, after dinner speech by crusty old Admiral:

"The army traditionally wore red on the battlefield, so that if someone was shot, the enemy could not see the blood. For the same reason Naval uniforms are blue."
 
gizawetofyagoffaskin said:
Mess dinner at Dartmouth, after dinner speech by crusty old Admiral:

"The army traditionally wore red on the battlefield, so that if someone was shot, the enemy could not see the blood. For the same reason Naval uniforms are blue."

Brilliant , :lol:
 
spider said:
Lt Andrews RN, was the Gunnery Officer known as "shovelface" and like all Gunnery staff its just a act on the Parade Ground. Incidently he was also respected for being a excellent and well liked Divisional Officer.

Was at Raleigh until Dec 83. Imagine our faces as young WEM's who had just passed out from Part 1 training as we boarded our coach to Collingwood only to see 'Shovelface' sat on one of the front seats. He was proceeding on Appointment to Collingwood and had jumped on the free transport

NIGHTMARE!!! .............. or so we thought.

As soon as we were over the Torpoint ferry it was he who led the singing and span us a good selection of sea dits.

The memory of him cycling round Collingwood is spot on. He used to cycle whilst stood to attention. Never used to sit down on the saddle. Funniest thing was seeing me and my mates salute him while he was cylcing. He tried to return the salute, wobbled and ended up in a bush. A memo came out shortly after stating that cycling officers were no longer to be saluted.

He also picked me up from the drill shed for not saluting him while I walking down the Marlbourgh building road. I could hardly see him - let alone his epaulettes.

The final memory was at Raliegh he always knew which platoon was where at divisions. How did he do it thought we. Imagine our dissapointment when we found out he had a small blackboard on the dias with all the platoons mapped out on it.

What a guy. He really did form a generation of Matelots
 
fishmiester said:
spider said:
Lt Andrews RN, was the Gunnery Officer known as "shovelface"

What a guy. He really did form a generation of Matelots
No shit. Where are the personalities in modern day life? People like that will stay in our memories for good and bad reasons. I'll raise a glass to shovel face tonight I think.........cheers
 

Talking of which,

Has anyone else fond memories of the pong from the shit tanks in the Hunt Class? Brecon got the worst of it having to do protracted sea trials of the system, and I recall that we had to run them for a while on Ledbury.

The problem as I recall was two fold. One was the system was designed for land based, fresh water usage, and the other was the bugs were reliant on all the ship’s company being regular.

Nothing could be done about the salt water, but at weekends alongside I recall the stokers having to feed the shit tank bugs powdered milk so that they didn’t start on themselves and produce the reek.

The reek was formidable and seemed to reach down your throat to the pit of your stomach and squeeze. Add in dieso fumes, cigar smoke and a reasonably boisterous sea state, you had a wonderful recipe for making the faint hearted call for God on the great white telephone. :lol:
 
fresh water usage

Talking of which,

Sent to the Falklands though an error in intellegence, both Brecon and ourselves (Ledbury) had reverse osmosis water plants installed in the wardroom flat on the removable deck above the engine room. This was a super move as it gave us fresh water reducing the need to RAS it from St Helena.

Both the plants were experimental models, ours was particularly tempermental. Part of the workings was a huge fly wheel which revolved at high speed. It was secured to the drive shaft with some spot welding, and this arrangement caused some scary moments.

The ship’s movement worked at the joints, until one day the thing started making a clattering noise that go louder. We were just about to step out into the flat to have a look when the fly wheel came adrift and started bounding around the flat like something possessed. It took and age for the crashing and banging to stop.

The stokey boys managed to re-secure it, but it was a temporary fix. For the rest of the trip we learned that when the beast started to clatter, either it had to be shut down swiftly or to take cover until the abandoned wild gyrations had ceased.

There's a lot to be said for a killik stoker and a pair of evaporators :D
 
fishmiester said:
spider said:
Lt Andrews RN, was the Gunnery Officer known as "shovelface" and like all Gunnery staff its just a act on the Parade Ground. Incidently he was also respected for being a excellent and well liked Divisional Officer.

Was at Raleigh until Dec 83. Imagine our faces as young WEM's who had just passed out from Part 1 training as we boarded our coach to Collingwood only to see 'Shovelface' sat on one of the front seats. He was proceeding on Appointment to Collingwood and had jumped on the free transport

NIGHTMARE!!! .............. or so we thought.

As soon as we were over the Torpoint ferry it was he who led the singing and span us a good selection of sea dits.

The memory of him cycling round Collingwood is spot on. He used to cycle whilst stood to attention. Never used to sit down on the saddle. Funniest thing was seeing me and my mates salute him while he was cylcing. He tried to return the salute, wobbled and ended up in a bush. A memo came out shortly after stating that cycling officers were no longer to be saluted.

He also picked me up from the drill shed for not saluting him while I walking down the Marlbourgh building road. I could hardly see him - let alone his epaulettes.

The final memory was at Raliegh he always knew which platoon was where at divisions. How did he do it thought we. Imagine our dissapointment when we found out he had a small blackboard on the dias with all the platoons mapped out on it.

What a guy. He really did form a generation of Matelots

Ah yes i remember hime well both at Raliegh in 82 and at Collingwood during my Killicks course.....He could pick you up across the distance of the Collingwood parade ground...i was in the Guard once ...dear god that was scary!

What a GI though top man!
 
Scribes said:
TheCommunicator said:
... Seriously though, he's been very ill over the last 3 years but I think he's stable now. I last saw him on the telly last November involved in some Semaphore message relay between the coast and London to do with T200

Good to hear he's better, he was the sort of bloke you never forget. And I'm forced to agree with Seadog, you can take the matelot out of the Andrew, but it's not easy to do the reverse. Here's to Big Chris, and hoping he has many more years of showing all around him the right way to get it done.

I am still in touch with chris, and yes he has been very ill in recent years, but always tries his best to make our Gibraltar Comcen reunions, if anyone would like to pass a message to chris then please email me at
garrydotleander58atbtinternetdotcom
cheers
Joe Fraser .....
 
Back in 78,our Chief GI was agreat bloke.Chief GI Meades.We were his last class before he retired.We passed as Capt Guard class he was in tears when it was announced.He used to use "Bionics" to teach us the drill manoevers.
"About Turn!For you lot i will do it in Bionics!I can do Bionics cos im a fcuking smartarse"Then he would demonstrate the move with the sound effects from the 6 Million Dollar man.Last i heard was he was a Mod Plod on Vernon Gate.
 
saw lt andrew in fareham a little while ago - introduced myself and thanked him for a wonderful time (not appreciated at the time) at daedalus 91 - 94.

absolutely top bloke - hiding behind jack blair shop on a divs morning.

when he went out with the spearhead platoon - he had some amazing stories

hope he realises that he made us what we are today.

thankyou sir
 

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