The Immortal Bard

#1
As a long time aficionado of the Bard I have always been fascinated by what could be considered his "famous last words". It seems they have been effective as the great man still rests in peace although some unmentionable has proposed his body be disturbed so it can be scientifically examined. I hope that never happens.
[align=center]In 1611 Shakespeare retired and left London. He made a will on March 25,
1616, and died on April 23, 1616. He was fifty two years old. The cause of
Shakespeare's death is not known. Shakespeare also wrote his own epitaph
because during his time, when the graveyard was full, people would dig up
someone's corpse and burn it so that another could be buried in that
person's place. This disgusted Shakespeare, and he didn't want this type
of disrespect after his death. His epitaph reads as follows:
"Good Friends, for Jesus' sake forbear,"
To dig the bones enclosed here!
Blest be the man that spares these stones,
And curst be he that moves my bones."

To this day no one has disturbed Shakespeare's grave.[/align]

Without any disrespect to the Bard this may be the origin of " hot bunking"
 

CheefTiff

Lantern Swinger
#2
hobbit said:
As a long time aficionado of the Bard I have always been fascinated by what could be considered his "famous last words". It seems they have been effective as the great man still rests in peace although some unmentionable has proposed his body be disturbed so it can be scientifically examined. I hope that never happens.
[align=center]In 1611 Shakespeare retired and left London. He made a will on March 25,
1616, and died on April 23, 1616. He was fifty two years old. The cause of
Shakespeare's death is not known. Shakespeare also wrote his own epitaph
because during his time, when the graveyard was full, people would dig up
someone's corpse and burn it so that another could be buried in that
person's place. This disgusted Shakespeare, and he didn't want this type
of disrespect after his death. His epitaph reads as follows:
"Good Friends, for Jesus' sake forbear,"


To dig the bones enclosed here!
Blest be the man that spares these stones,
And curst be he that moves my bones."

To this day no one has disturbed Shakespeare's grave.[/align]

Without any disrespect to the Bard this may be the origin of " hot bunking"
We better just hope that The Crossraid Bill never gets enacted cos by my calculation they'll have to dig the old bugger up to make way for a tube train !
 
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