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The 15 hundreds-- Domestic facts

Instead of just sitting there trying to remember the name of that sweet young thing you gave one to in the phone box outside St Levan's Gate Try these.
Why were tomatoes thought poisonous for 400 years?
What are the origins of "upper crust"?
Thresh-hold What is that all about?
Dirt poor--?
Raining cats and dogs?
Throwing the baby out with the bath water?
All originated in the early 16th century but do you know why?
 

Standard_Bearer

Lantern Swinger
1 Because they were red
2 The rich people had the upper part of a loaf of bread and the lower order had the burnt hard bottom crust
3 The threshings of wheat ,i.e. straw was used as a floor covering and a lump of wood stopped it going outside.
4 /5/6. Dunno!
 

AfterSSE

War Hero
Are these some of em....

Next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500's:

1. Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good by June.

2. However, they were starting to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor.

3. Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children and last of all the babies. By then, the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it. Hence, the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water."

4. Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw, piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the dogs, cats and other small animals (mice rats, and bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained, it became slippery, and, sometimes, the animals would slip and fall off the roof. Hence the saying, "It's raining cats and dogs."

5. There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could really mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.

6. The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence, the saying "dirt poor."

7. The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh on the floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they kept adding more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entranceway. Hence, a "thresh hold."

8. They cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day, they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight, and then start over the next day. Sometimes, the stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence, the rhyme, "Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old."

9. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man "could bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and "chew the fat."

10. Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with a high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning and death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so, for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous. Most people did not have pewter plates, but had trenchers, a piece of wood with the middle scooped out like a bowl. Often, trenchers were made from stale bread, which was so old and hard that they could use them for quite some time. Trenchers were never washed, and a lot of times worms and mold got into the old bread. After eating off wormy, moldy trenchers, one would get "trench mouth."

11. Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or "upper crust."

12. Lead cups were used to drink ale or whiskey. The combination would sometimes knock them out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence, the custom of holding a "wake."

13. England is old and small, and they started out running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to "bone-house" and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside, and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they thought they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the "graveyard shift") to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be "saved by the bell" or was considered a "dead ringer."
:bball:

Or these... http://www.snopes.com/language/phrases/1500.asp
 
Feck all wrong with the Oirish matey. The Guinness goes down well over here. Only bad pint I ever had was up North where the loonies live!!
 
Passed-over_Loggie said:
Is it one of they clever Oirish quizes? They say the answer and you have to tell them the question?

Feck all wrong with the Oirish matey. The Guinness goes down well over here. Only bad pint I ever had was up North where the loonies live!!
 
After SSE, practice number 3 persisted with the Victorian Navy, except the wooden tubs were filled with cold water and the water went blue from the dye in the serge uniforms discolouring the wearers' bodies... well actually the practice persisted into the 1920s, for ratings only of course!
 
SILVER_FOX said:
Irish Quizes have to be like that so'as you English types can understand them better.

SF

So Gordon Brown's Budget was an Orish Budget then: he announced raising the IHT threshold first then thought of why he had hadn't actually pinched the Conservatives policies later? :biggrin:
 
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