Sundodgers United

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
Membership of We Remember Submariners

****IMPORTANT NOTICE****

We are proud to announce that We Remember Submariners is now open for anyone to join, as a member.

Membership is entirely optional and does not affect anybody being able to purchase the annual pin, from the shop, website or outstations.
Annual membership costs £10 for a full 12 months membership. For that, members will receive:
The yearly pin (worth £5.50),
A member badge (worth £5.50)
10% discount in the online shop (excluding the current yearly pin) and
The option to receive a periodic newsletter.
... and, if you are a submarine veteran, being remembered with a gold poppy, should you sadly pass away whilst you were a member.
Additional pins are also available through outstations and from the online shop.
Sign up now at https://we-remember-submariners.com/membersh…/wrs-membership
Please share, lets get the word out.
Registered Charity of England & Wales No 1176446
 

Sumo

War Hero
Membership of We Remember Submariners

****IMPORTANT NOTICE****

We are proud to announce that We Remember Submariners is now open for anyone to join, as a member.

Membership is entirely optional and does not affect anybody being able to purchase the annual pin, from the shop, website or outstations.
Annual membership costs £10 for a full 12 months membership. For that, members will receive:
The yearly pin (worth £5.50),
A member badge (worth £5.50)
10% discount in the online shop (excluding the current yearly pin) and
The option to receive a periodic newsletter.
... and, if you are a submarine veteran, being remembered with a gold poppy, should you sadly pass away whilst you were a member.
Additional pins are also available through outstations and from the online shop.
Sign up now at https://we-remember-submariners.com/membersh…/wrs-membership
Please share, lets get the word out.
Registered Charity of England & Wales No 1176446
already in it :)
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
Das Boot (1981)

The bulk of the film's $15 million budget was spent on constructing U-boats. Specifications for the original Type VII-C U-boat were found at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry. The plans were taken to the original builder of the subs, who was commissioned to build a full-sized, sea-going replica, their first such assignment since the war ended. A second full-sized model was built for interior filming.

Originally filmed in German, all of the major actors could speak English. When the movie was dubbed into English for USA and UK distribution, all of the principal actors actually dubbed their own voices into English.
The cast was deliberately kept indoors continually during the shooting period in order to look as pale as a real submarine crew would on a mission at sea.
The submarine models built for Das Boot were also the ones used in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981).
The movie was shot silent (because of exaggerated camera noise in the submarine interiors) and all German and English dialogue had to be looped.
The full-scale model was little more than a hollow shell with an engine, and could be used only in calm waters. While it was being filmed in rougher weather, it cracked in two and sank. It was later recovered, patched with wood planks and used for the final shots.
To simulate the storm in the Atlantic, a model of the tower was splashed with water from a large tank. Actor Jan Fedder lost his grip on the railing and was washed off the model, breaking a few ribs in the fall, one of the other actors instantly shouted "Man Overboard". At first Petersen didn't realize it was an accident but enthusiastically yelled "Good idea, Jan. We'll do that one more time!". Peterson still kept the scene and rewrote Jan Fedder's part in the film, so that his character spent a short portion of the movie in bed. The actor actually had to be brought back and forth from the hospital every day because of concussion. The painful expression on his face is real and not acted. (The scene which features him bedridden is available on the uncut edition.)
Because the original TV mini-series was severely criticized in Germany for portraying World War II Germans sympathetically, the producer greeted the first American showing of the film at the Los Angeles Film Festival with great trepidation. They weren't sure how a former enemy nation in that war would react to the film, especially in a city with a large Jewish population, and their fears were reinforced when the audience applauded the opening caption saying 30,000 of 40,000 German men that went into war in submarines didn't come back. However, when it ended, the audience gave the film a standing ovation in appreciation of the artistry of the filmmakers.
To help his actors convey the claustrophobic conditions found on a real U-boat, director Wolfgang Petersen insisted on filming within the actual confines of the ship (scarcely wider than a man's outstretched arms), rather than removing the model's outer wall.
Scenes were shot in sequence so that the growth of beards would be entirely natural, although a few shots had to be redone later on with false hair.
In the scene in the La Rochelle bar, Otto Sander (Thomsen) was really drunk.
The picture was nominated for six Academy Awards which was at the time the highest number of Oscar nominations ever received by a foreign language film. The record has since been beaten by such films as Life Is Beautiful (1997) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000).
A miniature submarine was used for scenes in which we see the submarine from outside. The model was steered from the inside by a diver. After three days, the diver who was hired to steer the model had to quit. He had gotten sea sick for the first time in his two-decades-spanning career.
To get one particular interior shot, a section of the model's wall was removed. However, Wolfgang Petersen and cinematographer Jost Vacano felt that it detracted from the film's overall authenticity, and from then on only ever filmed the interior from within the confines of the boat.
The scene in which the navigation officer takes an astronomical sight using a sextant is very accurate. The actor is even filmed rocking the sextant from side to side which is not very known to non sailors.
The human figures on the 35 foot model were modified Barbie (or rather Ken) dolls.
When the submarine leaves port at La Rochelle, all modern craft had to be evacuated from the area, while the various modern structures in the background were disguised with plumes of smoke.
Three scale models were built for special effects work. The first, a 35 foot remote controlled model, could sail in high seas and dive; the other two, 18 feet and 8 feet in length, were used for underwater shots. Scale models of tankers, destroyers and other ships were also built to complete the armada.
Lothar G. Buchheim was incensed when he first saw the scene of one crew member dancing like some sort of tropical girl while the rest of the crew shouted out catcalls and wolf whistles. He said that no U-boat crew would ever behave in such a way.
The emblem on the U-96's conning tower is the Laughing Sawfish, the emblem of the 9th flotilla from Brest. It was usually green in colour.
Depth-charge explosion effects were created by detonating small explosives in a 5m-deep tank and filming them at 1500 frames per second.
Unusually for a major motion picture, was filmed largely in sequence.
The only remaining U-boot of the VII-C class wasn't used in the movie because it is a technical monument and memorial which can not only be visited, you can actually get an inside view of the U-995. It's located in Laboe/Germany and was placed there in 1972.
 

Stirlin

War Hero
Das Boot (1981)

The bulk of the film's $15 million budget was spent on constructing U-boats. Specifications for the original Type VII-C U-boat were found at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry. The plans were taken to the original builder of the subs, who was commissioned to build a full-sized, sea-going replica, their first such assignment since the war ended. A second full-sized model was built for interior filming.

Originally filmed in German, all of the major actors could speak English. When the movie was dubbed into English for USA and UK distribution, all of the principal actors actually dubbed their own voices into English.
The cast was deliberately kept indoors continually during the shooting period in order to look as pale as a real submarine crew would on a mission at sea.
The submarine models built for Das Boot were also the ones used in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981).
The movie was shot silent (because of exaggerated camera noise in the submarine interiors) and all German and English dialogue had to be looped.
The full-scale model was little more than a hollow shell with an engine, and could be used only in calm waters. While it was being filmed in rougher weather, it cracked in two and sank. It was later recovered, patched with wood planks and used for the final shots.
To simulate the storm in the Atlantic, a model of the tower was splashed with water from a large tank. Actor Jan Fedder lost his grip on the railing and was washed off the model, breaking a few ribs in the fall, one of the other actors instantly shouted "Man Overboard". At first Petersen didn't realize it was an accident but enthusiastically yelled "Good idea, Jan. We'll do that one more time!". Peterson still kept the scene and rewrote Jan Fedder's part in the film, so that his character spent a short portion of the movie in bed. The actor actually had to be brought back and forth from the hospital every day because of concussion. The painful expression on his face is real and not acted. (The scene which features him bedridden is available on the uncut edition.)
Because the original TV mini-series was severely criticized in Germany for portraying World War II Germans sympathetically, the producer greeted the first American showing of the film at the Los Angeles Film Festival with great trepidation. They weren't sure how a former enemy nation in that war would react to the film, especially in a city with a large Jewish population, and their fears were reinforced when the audience applauded the opening caption saying 30,000 of 40,000 German men that went into war in submarines didn't come back. However, when it ended, the audience gave the film a standing ovation in appreciation of the artistry of the filmmakers.
To help his actors convey the claustrophobic conditions found on a real U-boat, director Wolfgang Petersen insisted on filming within the actual confines of the ship (scarcely wider than a man's outstretched arms), rather than removing the model's outer wall.
Scenes were shot in sequence so that the growth of beards would be entirely natural, although a few shots had to be redone later on with false hair.
In the scene in the La Rochelle bar, Otto Sander (Thomsen) was really drunk.
The picture was nominated for six Academy Awards which was at the time the highest number of Oscar nominations ever received by a foreign language film. The record has since been beaten by such films as Life Is Beautiful (1997) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000).
A miniature submarine was used for scenes in which we see the submarine from outside. The model was steered from the inside by a diver. After three days, the diver who was hired to steer the model had to quit. He had gotten sea sick for the first time in his two-decades-spanning career.
To get one particular interior shot, a section of the model's wall was removed. However, Wolfgang Petersen and cinematographer Jost Vacano felt that it detracted from the film's overall authenticity, and from then on only ever filmed the interior from within the confines of the boat.
The scene in which the navigation officer takes an astronomical sight using a sextant is very accurate. The actor is even filmed rocking the sextant from side to side which is not very known to non sailors.
The human figures on the 35 foot model were modified Barbie (or rather Ken) dolls.
When the submarine leaves port at La Rochelle, all modern craft had to be evacuated from the area, while the various modern structures in the background were disguised with plumes of smoke.
Three scale models were built for special effects work. The first, a 35 foot remote controlled model, could sail in high seas and dive; the other two, 18 feet and 8 feet in length, were used for underwater shots. Scale models of tankers, destroyers and other ships were also built to complete the armada.
Lothar G. Buchheim was incensed when he first saw the scene of one crew member dancing like some sort of tropical girl while the rest of the crew shouted out catcalls and wolf whistles. He said that no U-boat crew would ever behave in such a way.
The emblem on the U-96's conning tower is the Laughing Sawfish, the emblem of the 9th flotilla from Brest. It was usually green in colour.
Depth-charge explosion effects were created by detonating small explosives in a 5m-deep tank and filming them at 1500 frames per second.
Unusually for a major motion picture, was filmed largely in sequence.
The only remaining U-boot of the VII-C class wasn't used in the movie because it is a technical monument and memorial which can not only be visited, you can actually get an inside view of the U-995. It's located in Laboe/Germany and was placed there in 1972.
That deserves some appropriate music , you may not like the music I think it is ACE but there are plenty of
'' boat'' noises that sundodgers will recognise............oh and it is by U96 , Die Mission.
-



Another one from same album Das Boot 2.
-
 
Last edited:

Similar threads


Latest Threads

New Posts

Top