Submarine accident 21 March 2007

#41
USN report:

From Commander, Submarine Force Public Affairs
NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- The Royal Navy submarine HMS Tireless, participating in the Joint U.S. Navy/Royal Navy Ice Exercise 2007 (ICEX-2007) in the Arctic Ocean, experienced an explosion of a self contained oxygen generation candle that killed two crew members and injured one.

The explosion occurred at approximately 12:20 a.m. (EDT) March 21.

The injured member of the crew has been transported by an Alaska Air National Guard C-130 to Anchorage for treatment.

“I am deeply saddened at the loss of the crewmembers from the Tireless,†said Vice Adm. Jay Donnelly, Commander, Submarine Force. “Submariners are brothers at sea and we all feel the loss as if it were our own. We stand by to continue to assist in any way we can.â€

ICEX-2007 and Royal Navy officials have confirmed that the Tireless is safe and operational and that a full assessment is being conducted.

Tireless is commanded by Cdr. Iain Breckenridge of the Royal Navy. It is home ported in Plymouth, Devon, and has been operating with the USS Alexandria (SSN 757), in joint testing on submarine operability and tactical development in Arctic waters.

The U.S. Navy and Royal Navy Arctic cooperation represents an excellent example of the shared vision and resources the two navies enjoy. Since 1986, every Arctic tactical exercise has involved both U.S. Navy and Royal Navy submarines.

The U.S. submarine force conducts exercises in waters around the globe, including the Arctic, in order to guarantee assured access to any ocean in the world. The
submarine force continues to use the Arctic Ocean as an alternate route for shifting submarines between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. U.S. submarines must continue to train in the Arctic environment to refine and validate procedures and required equipment in support of operational safety.
Rest in peace and I wish the injured sailor a speedy recovery
 
#43
Two more young Submariners depart on their "Last Patrol". May their particular God take care of their souls.

Submarines were and still are a dangerous occupation.



NUtty
 
#45
A safe crossing of the bar may you find safe anchorage,
My heart goes out to family and friends, and to their oppo's.
to all in peril on the sea.


May your God go with you & bless you.
 
#47
R.I.P., and deepest sympathy for the families, friends and the rest of the crew. May the survivor make a full recovery, both physically and mentally.
 
#54
On Radio 4 this morning Admiral Sir Alan West (A Submariner himself) mentioned that the explosion occurred in the fwd part of the Boat whilst the Oxygen Generator was being used/maintained/whatever. (The Submariners here will know the piece of equipment mentioned). These and modifications of them have been used in our Boats since WW2. and as Maxi states this equipment is usually very safe.

No doubt in due course The Board of Inquiry will publish its findings.

My condolences to all loved ones of the two lads who perished,and a very quick recovery to the injured crew member.

R.I.P.
 
#55
RIP lads. Speedy recovery to injured guy.


(As a Wafu Skimmer, would somebody please explain to me what an Oxygen candle is, and what it is used for? PM please, don't want to hijack this thread.)

RoofRat
 
#57
A cylindrical device approx 20" tall- 6" diameter. (picture a large candle flat at both ends without a wick) The 'candle' is inserted into a bulkhead fixed piece of equipment. (the generator) It is switched on (electrical current) and over a matter of time 'burns down' creating oxygen which is then dispersed throughout the Boat to replace 'foul air'. (They were used extensively in the O Boats on long patrols when unable to snort). When unloaded the spent candle resembled ash of a cigar but more solid.
Usually a safe piece of equipment. During my time the only accidents I came across when using them were crushed fingers which managed to get tangled up in the loading/shutting procedure.
 
#59
G_Rivet said:
A cylindrical device approx 20" tall- 6" diameter. (picture a large candle flat at both ends without a wick) The 'candle' is inserted into a bulkhead fixed piece of equipment. (the generator) It is switched on (electrical current) and over a matter of time 'burns down' creating oxygen which is then dispersed throughout the Boat to replace 'foul air'. (They were used extensively in the O Boats on long patrols when unable to snort). When unloaded the spent candle resembled ash of a cigar but more solid.
Usually a safe piece of equipment. During my time the only accidents I came across when using them were crushed fingers which managed to get tangled up in the loading/shutting procedure.
The candles are square these days

I've hurd of candles catching fire, but i've never hurd of one exploding
 
#60
G_Rivet said:
A cylindrical device approx 20" tall- 6" diameter. (picture a large candle flat at both ends without a wick) The 'candle' is inserted into a bulkhead fixed piece of equipment. (the generator) It is switched on (electrical current) and over a matter of time 'burns down' creating oxygen which is then dispersed throughout the Boat to replace 'foul air'. (They were used extensively in the O Boats on long patrols when unable to snort). When unloaded the spent candle resembled ash of a cigar but more solid.
Usually a safe piece of equipment. During my time the only accidents I came across when using them were crushed fingers which managed to get tangled up in the loading/shutting procedure.
Many were started with a blank cartridge rather than electrical heaters in case power was not available. The biggest risk was getting grease on the candle as as this could cause an explosion.
 

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