stuff to do in my life before AIB

M

matlo_caroline

Guest
#21
I am going for my AIB and i would listen to dunkers if i were you he is totally right and has taught me alot of things about the AIB he is very useful ( hope you don't midn me saying so dunkers) .
Another thing have you been on any aquaint courses theses are really herlpful and very valuable and also ship visits and short trips i have had the wonderful opportunity to do both of these and just completed the BRNC summer camp all these show how much you are comitted to joining the Royal Navy as an Officer.
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#22
Good tip (and take it from me as a Regulator; and this works in ALL areas of the RN): Be honest and don't bullsh*t a bullsh*tter! If you don't know the answer don't waffle. The AIB personnel have probably heard almost every excuse so far and will prod, poke and exploit every chink in your armour. They are not necessarily singling you out for criticism but are seeing how you react when faced with a dilemma under pressure. If you don't know, say so - don't lie. Being clever is fine; trying to be clever is not!
 
#23
matlo_caroline said:
I am going for my AIB and i would listen to dunkers if i were you he is totally right and has taught me alot of things about the AIB he is very useful ( hope you don't midn me saying so dunkers) .
Another thing have you been on any aquaint courses theses are really herlpful and very valuable and also ship visits and short trips i have had the wonderful opportunity to do both of these and just completed the BRNC summer camp all these show how much you are comitted to joining the Royal Navy as an Officer.
See you in the fleet (and ohaire) as my next D.O.

Seriously good luck to both :wink:
 
#24
A point to make, if you want to make a good naval officer you can do as many courses and get as many qualifications as you like and it will make not one little bit of difference. I am sorry to say if you want to be true to yourself if you don’t have `it` you wont make it.
Hope this makes sense.
 
#26
ohaire said:
im looking to do something voluntary related to sport, prefereably something where i can really blow the leadership bugle
It's not all about sport and leadership, I've not seen anyone mention a broad understanding of world events and current affairs?

Good Luck anyway ohaire.
 
#28
dunkers said:
They no longer assess your awareness of current affairs at the AIB now. Which is a mistake maybe.
I wasnt aware of that, shows how old I'm getting!
I think that's a big mistake! Although I know some people in the past who have failed on just that - should they get the chance to go through now!!
 
#29
Right im appling for the AIb got all my papers.
Would they not mind that my full time job tillthe navy would possibly be a Community Support officer and do you think they will like it.
 
#30
They would like it even if you worked in Mcdonalds. A certain midshipman you like or used to like worked there and they "loved it". I can't see them "minding" it at all; it's not like you've been working for the Soviet Navy before applying to the RN is it? In fact you could make a big deal about working with people in potentially difficult scenarios.
 
#32
dunkers said:
How about local voluntary activities? If you were to volunteer to do something that would benefit others that would go in your favour and might provide some situations in which you have to display communication ability/leadership/teamwork etc... just a thought. Are there any voluntary jobs near you that involve working with the public? For instance near me there is an old historic ship on which you can volunteer to show people round. Obviously it doesn't have to be naval related but that sort of thing would reflect well on you.
Speaking as a Civvy I agree here, however there is volunteering and volunteering. Much involves just helping out. Where you would gain real insight and have an opportunity to exercise leadership would be to involve yourself in committee work for a charity. Committees can be notoriously argumentative at times and if you volunteer for a position of real responsibility and do the job properly (reading up about it beforehand, doing the odd course, talking to others, etc) you will probably soon find yourself in a position where leadership skills come to the fore: especially as Honorary Secretary or less so as Treasurer and Chair. I have been Hon.Sec. for two small medical charities (one registered with the Charities Commission) and can assure you that this is THE test! You need diplomacy, you must be able to admit if you've made a mistake and seek to rectify it but you must also be capable of standing your ground when necessary, and believe me you can have the majority of the committee against you at times, but you must do your duty. An example might be compliance with the Data Protection Acts, a point where I came to blows with one of my committees, who wanted an easy life and wanted to flout the law! Other areas are getting the team to work, for example through the annual report, whilst bearing in mind that you need to motivate volunteers. I would suggest a small charity where you have the opportunity to make an impact, hopefully for the better!

All excellent training I should have thought and I expect this would impress the AIB. What do you think, Dunkers?

Steve.

PS: Being Hon.Sec is bloody hard work but can be very satisfying when you feel you have achieved something tangible!
 
#33
Always_a_Civvy said:
All excellent training I should have thought and I expect this would impress the AIB. What do you think, Dunkers?
I think you're absolutely right. The AIB these days is all about proving what leadership ability you have, ie by giving them examples of times when you have exercised such an ability. It also looks for evidence of teamworking ability, etc. I went to the AIB but failed because I could not give the AIB much "proof" of ability, and that's what they want. I was told to come back in a year with more tangible experience (must have done something right if I was told to come back thankfully).

Steve, I'm glad you said that committee work is ideal for gaining releveant/realistic experience. I've just joined the management committee of the local sea cadets which meets monthly. From what I've seen so far there can be a lot of heated discussion... in the most gentlemanly way of course! So I shall get stuck in :lol:
 

Darb

Lantern Swinger
#34
If you are dead set on becoming an officer things you really need to do are.
1. Insert Plum in mouth
2. Remove back bone
3. Forget any CDF you have ever learnt
4. Begin to consider anything you are told by more experianced persons to be lies.

4 simple steps sucess in the wardroom.

Enjoy
Oh you are a cynic :D

Would a newbie know what CDF stood for?

Having spent a few weeks on the forum reading the various posts, I am of the view that the best route to a commission is via the lower deck and the Upper Yardman Scheme - assuming that both the lower deck and the UY Scheme still exist that is :D
 
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