Strike Action!!!!

A

angrydoc

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#2
What proportion of the RMT membership is the 270 odd people who bothered to vote? Not a massive percentage, I'd suggest.
 
#3
What proportion of the RMT membership is the 270 odd people who bothered to vote? Not a massive percentage, I'd suggest.
.defencemanagement.com said:
.... The RFA employs around 2,000 civilians in its work supporting the Royal Navy fleet worldwide, and half are said to be members of the RMT union....

....RMT received 269 votes in its ballot on taking action, with 157 in favour of a strike and 108 against. A greater majority voted in favour of taking 'action short of a strike', with 214 of those balloted voting in favour, with 45 against. The remainder of the ballots were spoiled in each vote....
About 27%.
 
#4
It's back!
Hundreds of workers at the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) are to go on strike at the end of the month in the bitter row over public sector pensions.
The Rail Maritime and Transport (RMT) union said more than 600 of its members at the RFA, which supports and services the Navy, will walk out on March 28.
Navy support workers to strike - UK News - MSN News UK

In light of the previous comments on this thread is this going to pose a serious threat to RN Operations?
 
#5
are they working under the sponsored reserve scheme - if so do they then lose their right to strike as they are effectively RNR?
Sponsored reserve status has never been activated for any RFA ship, not least because it costs something in the region of £1000 per head every time it is done and would be a recurring cost as personnel rotate to and from the ship. If activated NDA or AFDA or whatever it is now would apply, though it applies (or would have) anyway if engaged on warlike operations and in other vague circumstances.

What effect did the previous RMT strike this winter have on RFA operations? I certainly didn't hear of any significant fallout. The usual trick, and the one that I heard was applied for the previous one-day strike, is to make sure that ships are at sea on that day. Striking is at least a little more difficult, and perhaps not permitted, when a ship is at sea. I'm not entirely sure of the details.
 

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