StrategyWorld: "Captain Bligh was a Lady"

Discussion in 'International' started by soleil, Jan 18, 2010.

Welcome to the Navy Net aka Rum Ration

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial RN website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    1. No mention here of what small ships are available in the USN to try out Lieutenants as COs. Also I suspect that some USN admirals have a hotline to this and that Congressman or Senator which either means the admiral in question is too hot for the system to ignore his recommends, or the admiral's recommends are for likely officers who are politically favoured - the USN personnel version of pork-barrel politics.

    2. Tripe to speak of the Ship's Company of the HM Armed Transport 'Bounty' as 'civilian'. It should be remembered that on Bligh's epic voyage in an open boat only one man was lost and that because of direct disobedience (albeit well-intentioned). During that voyage Bligh drew the first-ever fair chart of the Fiji islands! Any dispassionate analysis will show that the roots of the problem were cramped accommodation (because of the breadfruit rebuild) meaning no room for marines; Bounty spending too long in the paradise of Tahiti, where the going rate for a woman was one decent-size iron nail; and the unstable personality of Fletcher Christian. Bligh's later troubles in NSW were entirely because he tried to confront criminality and corruption, those basics of Oz politics.
     
  2. Saw a documentary on one of the DISCOVERY/NATGEO channels recently, where they checked the BOUNTY's log, and far from being the sadistic barsteward portrayed by Charles Laughton, Bligh did not use the cat as much as some of his peers - in fact he was quite lenient. Piggot of HERMIONE was far more liberal with it, which eventually led to a mutiny, the officers all being killed and the ship handed over to the Spanish. (See THE BLACK SHIP, by Dudley Pope).
    His voyage in the open boat must be one of the most brilliant stories of navigation in the history of the sea.
     

Share This Page