Spot of advice pls

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by stabradop, Jul 11, 2006.

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  1. Hi all, just joined the site a week or so ago having been referred by Arrse.

    I'm considering joining the navy after a long hard soul search. Just to give a bit of background, I'm 31 (nearly) and have spent a few years in the TA. Had abandoned the idea of a regular career when I got married but now divorce is up and coming this summer I am free to go wherever I want so thought I would make the move before I am too old. Am looking at Seaman Spec as a first choice, with the idea of perhaps going on Patrol Boats (Fishery Protection), dont suppose some of you more experienced matelots can give a bit of advice?


  2. Hey Stab,
    I'm not an experienced matelot myself but do have some advice - do it!
    If you don't do it now you never will, and it's not as if you can't come out once you're in if you made the wrong decision. Surely it's better to have a shot at it than alway wonder what life could have been like?

  3. cheers sophie, was kind of what i was thinking but i suppose the thing was my age, have done a few jobs since leaving college and was just wondering how I would fit in. Probably a bit easier when you are younger.

  4. Oldest RN recruit was 37. You sprog! :lol:
  5. I would say go for it. I am 31 and have completed all the entrance exams ect. Just waiting for joining instructions. As long as you are reasonably fit what have you to loose.I did wonder if I was past it but I though balls to it just do it. The more I look into the age thing the more I see that loads of 30 somthings do it. And why not? Your only as old as the bird your shagging. So I was 23 last week! Going to be an AET. Bring it on.
  6. Go for it, that's the nly way you will know whether you were right or wrong.

    Good luck.

  7. Go for it mate. Hopwever I must point out that if you intend serving on small ships.....make sure you don't get too seasick first cos them buggers don't half move about a lot. I speak with many years experience and if you do suffer seasickness it can be most unpleasant
  8. I must admit that did concern me. I've been seasick twice on a small fishing boat. First time I could put down to hangover but second time I had no excuse. Others with me were impressed by my geographical knowledge though as i was able to point out "Europe" (or yurrup) quite frequently throughout the trip. They were also impressed with all the groundbait I was laying altho thats another story.

    My friend (who organised the fishing trip) recommended stem ginger to cure seasickness. Does this work, and is there anything else that works?


  9. janner

    janner War Hero Book Reviewer

    Another thing to bear in mind (unless things have changed a lot since my time) is that whilst you may be offerred choices for type of ship, there is no guarentee that you will get what you ask for.
    That aside, go for it, you will get a grounding in life that will set you up for whatever else is to come in the future.
  10. We are all suceptable to motion sickness to some extent, don't believe the "I'm never seasick" stories completely. We all adapt to the environment differently but most people who are succeptable get over it within say 8 to 48 hours, and the more often you go to sea the better at not suffering you get. As you spotted going to sea with a hangover does not help.

    I don't know about ginger but many people find the wrist bands good. Always remeber you need to replace what has come up, dry biscuits are usually best.

    And remeber there is always boats, not many waves at 300 foeet.

  11. thanks for that mate, never heard of wrist bands tho, and are you allowed to wear them in the navy? Must admit I fancied Fishery Protection as there dont seem to be many long, long trips at sea. Not that it puts me off but I was chatting to an old hand a few years ago and he said that after a while one port looks pretty much like another, and as you are working you wont get to see a great deal of the countries you visit. A previous poster said that the smaller boats will move about a fair bit. Not vastly bothered by seasickness but dont want to be the useless carcass who spends a whole trip heaving lumps over the side. Or even worse kakking meself, was on a ferry once with a bloke who not only chundered but had it coming out of the opposite end as well, most horrid sight ever.

  12. Hey and welcome!

    You can go to boots and get those grey motion sickness bands, like above. You are allowed to wear them, not a problem at all, I used to wear them going over the Bay of Biscay!
  13. Jenny is right. But I wouldn't fancy crossing "The Bay" in a small ship it was bad enough in the larger ones.
  14. To be fair I have crossed the bay in many times in ships from frigate size down and even a 46 ft yacht. I have had nore good crossings than bad, and even had hands to bathe from an O boat.

  15. Yes, anything containing ginger works as it is an anti-emetic!
  16. Good for you Maxi - I didn't count yachts but I have also crossed the bay in one.
  17. Show off!
  18. You just need to go into Boats (submarines) you pass under all the waves hence no sea sickness and you get paid more and apparently after you qualify they give a few thou quid as a bonus. This is a win treble for you my son.

  19. Hi, Just for info I completed my phase II a few days ago with an ex-STAB (signals) and she was 32! She did find it difficult with younger people but completed the course and is joining her first draft in two weeks!

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