Spoonerisms

#1
A spoonerism is a play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched. It is named after the Reverend William Archibald Spooner (1844–1930), Warden of New College, Oxford, who was notoriously prone to this tendency.

While spoonerisms are commonly heard as slips of the tongue (sometimes spoonerised as tips of the slung), they are considered a form of pun when used purposely as a play on words.Apparently there is a room at Oxford named the Rooner Spoom.


Some spoonerisms are unintentional while others are deliberate . I cant recall any unintentional but a couple I've heard used intentionally are

Chuck you farley
Cunning stunt

There must be countless examples in both categories, be interesting to hear of any ' tips of the slung ' by the famous
 
#4
Was it a Dimbleby who, when recording a radio documentary many years ago, said :

"And here we are in the land of the n****** (not a currently accepted word amongst non africans) " instead of "The land of the Niger", and all hell erupting from this slip of the tongue ?
I can't recall how the BBC recovered from this - anyone else recall the incident ?
 
#7
mind u the classic told to me by the late Dodger Long ( not dead, just always late!) is the oriental porn mag translation

"stod it, stod it farter" she crid "for this is insect and you'll give me a burberry".
"stod it" she said, as I throd her across the soda and rapped her knackers off
"stod it please" as the spug truckled down her thugs to her uncles


alternatively the Hong Kong tattoo
"I lub my wire and doubtHer"
 
#10
whitemouse said:
Was it a Dimbleby who, when recording a radio documentary many years ago, said :
"And here we are in the land of the n****** (not a currently accepted word amongst non africans) " instead of "The land of the Niger", and all hell erupting from this slip of the tongue ?
I can't recall how the BBC recovered from this - anyone else recall the incident ?
No, I fink it was Mack di Janio!
 
#12
bucky said:
mind u the classic told to me by the late Dodger Long ( not dead, just always late!) is the oriental porn mag translation

"stod it, stod it farter" she crid "for this is insect and you'll give me a burberry".
"stod it" she said, as I throd her across the soda and rapped her knackers off
"stod it please" as the spug truckled down her thugs to her uncles


alternatively the Hong Kong tattoo
"I lub my wire and doubtHer"
I think that you`re getting mixed up ( or muxed ip) with Egyptian AFO`s
 
#13
hobbit said:
A spoonerism is a play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched. It is named after the Reverend William Archibald Spooner (1844–1930), Warden of New College, Oxford, who was notoriously prone to this tendency.

While spoonerisms are commonly heard as slips of the tongue (sometimes spoonerised as tips of the slung), they are considered a form of pun when used purposely as a play on words.Apparently there is a room at Oxford named the Rooner Spoom.


Some spoonerisms are unintentional while others are deliberate . I cant recall any unintentional but a couple I've heard used intentionally are

Chuck you farley
Cunning stunt

There must be countless examples in both categories, be interesting to hear of any ' tips of the slung ' by the famous
Get off you hobbit horse? :lol:
 
#14
hobbit said:
Some spoonerisms are unintentional while others are deliberate .

There must be countless examples in both categories, be interesting to hear of any ' tips of the slung ' by the famous
There is the unforgettable Kenny Everett character - Cupid Stunt
 
#17
Always_a_Civvy said:
hobbit said:
A spoonerism is a play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched. It is named after the Reverend William Archibald Spooner (1844–1930), Warden of New College, Oxford, who was notoriously prone to this tendency.

While spoonerisms are commonly heard as slips of the tongue (sometimes spoonerised as tips of the slung), they are considered a form of pun when used purposely as a play on words.Apparently there is a room at Oxford named the Rooner Spoom.


Some spoonerisms are unintentional while others are deliberate . I cant recall any unintentional but a couple I've heard used intentionally are

Chuck you farley
Cunning stunt

There must be countless examples in both categories, be interesting to hear of any ' tips of the slung ' by the famous
Get off you hobbit horse? :lol:
Neigh