Some old (ish) aerial pics of Dev & Plymouth Sound

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
Also built a big garbo incinerator, which really impressed the locals up on the hill
Woman at work wouldn't speak to me for ages as I wouldn't sign the petition to stop it being built (she lives near the end of shaky bridge)

When she asked me why I wouldn't sign I said they might ending up building it in my back garden and I'm more than happy for it to be in yours.

it was a mega flounce out of the office with much slamming of doors :D
 

Lemacque

Midshipman
Woman at work wouldn't speak to me for ages as I wouldn't sign the petition to stop it being built (she lives near the end of shaky bridge)

When she asked me why I wouldn't sign I said they might ending up building it in my back garden and I'm more than happy for it to be in yours.

it was a mega flounce out of the office with much slamming of doors :D
lol, I remember the anger. Funny how the houses are all being demolished at the mo
 

powers2

Midshipman
The floating dock was for O boats, AFD 59 IIRC, floating canteen was moored up near it, you could get a couple of tinnies at standeasy there :)

The refuelling crane w was a massive white elephant that was never used.
The floating dock is AFD 58 which arrived at Devonport on 10/9/69. It sat in the north eastern corner of 5 basin for many years during which time its occupants included conventional submarines, frigates and survey vessels. In the 1970’s it was a useful addition to Devonport’s docking facilities (along with the newly created 11 and 12 docks at North Lock) during the construction of the Frigate Complex when 5, 6 and 7 docks were out of commission.

The SRC refuelling crane was the largest of its type in Europe when built, its primary function being the removal and replacement of nuclear cores during SSN refits - hence its name. In 2008, after almost 30 years of service, a change in refit policy rendered it surplus to requirements and it was taken down.

The photo was taken between 29/10/79 and 2/11/79 when the following vessels were present:

3 Leander frigates, HMS Galatea on 7 wharf (bottom right) with HMS Leander and HMS Ariadne on 11 and 12 wharves respectively (centre left)
and
3 conventional submarines, HMS Olympus on 9 wharf, HMS Walrus on the east wall of 5 basin (centre right) and HMS Osiris in AFD 58.

During a severe gale in 1980, the rail mounted dockside crane seen between the two frigates on 11/12 wharves was blown over onto the frigates HMS Minerva and HMS Ambuscade causing extensive damage to both, luckily without injury to any crew member.

Regards
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
The floating dock is AFD 58 which arrived at Devonport on 10/9/69. It sat in the north eastern corner of 5 basin for many years during which time its occupants included conventional submarines, frigates and survey vessels. In the 1970’s it was a useful addition to Devonport’s docking facilities (along with the newly created 11 and 12 docks at North Lock) during the construction of the Frigate Complex when 5, 6 and 7 docks were out of commission.

The SRC refuelling crane was the largest of its type in Europe when built, its primary function being the removal and replacement of nuclear cores during SSN refits - hence its name. In 2008, after almost 30 years of service, a change in refit policy rendered it surplus to requirements and it was taken down.

The photo was taken between 29/10/79 and 2/11/79 when the following vessels were present:

3 Leander frigates, HMS Galatea on 7 wharf (bottom right) with HMS Leander and HMS Ariadne on 11 and 12 wharves respectively (centre left)
and
3 conventional submarines, HMS Olympus on 9 wharf, HMS Walrus on the east wall of 5 basin (centre right) and HMS Osiris in AFD 58.

During a severe gale in 1980, the rail mounted dockside crane seen between the two frigates on 11/12 wharves was blown over onto the frigates HMS Minerva and HMS Ambuscade causing extensive damage to both, luckily without injury to any crew member.

Regards
I think I'm right in saying the crane was never used as initially it didn't reach far enough, an extension was put on the end, but being a concrete structure, it started to crack as it wasn't designed to have the extra bit put on it.

I remember the crane landing on the frigates during the storm, it was the vertical pillar type, my boat was on 9 wharf and I was duty that night :)
 

powers2

Midshipman
I think I'm right in saying the crane was never used as initially it didn't reach far enough, an extension was put on the end, but being a concrete structure, it started to crack as it wasn't designed to have the extra bit put on it.

I remember the crane landing on the frigates during the storm, it was the vertical pillar type, my boat was on 9 wharf and I was duty that night :)
Interesting to read of your understanding of the crane’s unsuitability for refuelling duties. A theory I’ve not heard of before.

Having been present during the crane’s installation and testing I wasn’t aware of any problems at that time. However, I moved away from the SRC two years after its commissioning so cannot provide a personal assessment of its efficiency over the following decades. I can however provide the following extract from a magazine article written by a senior executive regarding the crane’s overall performance up to its dismantling in 2008:

“Constructed by crane engineering specialists Stothert and Pitt in a giant cantilever, or hammerhead design, the Devonport crane was used to lift large items of plant, equipment, and containers used while removing and replacing fuel modules – a job it undertook for 30 years until its final refuelling of the Trafalgar class nuclear attack submarine HMS Triumph in 2008”……. Malcolm Smith, Special Projects Director, Babcock Marine, March 2009

Mr Smith was also quoted as stating that “the crane had performed admirably over the years supporting the refitting of the Swiftsure and Trafalgar class submarines. It has been extremely useful and will be missed”

Personally, I’m pleased that it seems to have been as efficient throughout its life as it was when I first encountered it back in the late 1970’s. Regards.
 

powers2

Midshipman
A couple of photos of the north west corner of Devonport’s 5 basin before and after the construction of the Submarine Refit Complex.

The black and white shot was taken in 1962 and shows RN vessels on the basin’s north wall and protruding arm. Prominent on 8, 9 and 10 wharves are the substantial coal heaps and associated dockside paraphernalia, with another relic from a previous age in the form of the distinctive ‘goose neck’ crane at the southern end of 8. Within two decades all of this will have been swept away in readiness for the construction of the numerous buildings that will make up the SRC, HMS Defiance and the 2nd Submarine Squadron Headquarters.

The coloured photo shows the same area in 1979 just prior to completion of building work with the new SRC blotting out the other 2 sites beyond. Dominating the radically changed scene is the huge refuelling crane which, owing to its prominence, was specially designed so that its 1,600 tonne steel jib presented a clean and harmonious silhouette on the skyline. It had a lifting capacity of 80 tonnes at a radius of 72 metres to a height of 46 metres, an astonishing piece of engineering. Just one lonely vessel occupies the basin arm. Surprisingly, this modern looking view has already been consigned to history as the crane and 8 storey CMO block have long since been demolished. Regards5 Basin north west.JPG5 Basin north west 2.jpg
 

Latest Threads

New Posts

Top