Sink the Bismark! 1455 today

Discussion in 'The Quarterdeck' started by Seaweed, Feb 27, 2010.

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  1. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    Sink the Bismark!

    Heads up - Sink the Bismark! 1455 on Film 4 today

    Includes Kenneth More & Michael Hordern both of whom served in the RN in WW2, so learned how to wear the suit.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2014
  2. Programmed in! :D
     
  3. The best bit about Sink the Bismarck is the incomparably beautiful Dana Wynter (my avatar) in a WRNS uniform - God, she is lovely! Its worth watching for her alone.

    I was fortunate enough to meet Jock Moffat the Swordfish Pilot who flew from the ARK ROYAL and launched the torpedo which crippled Bismarck's rudder allowing the rest of the British fleet to finish her off. A truly amazing man, very humble and he graciously signed my DVD copyof the film.
     
  4. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    Of all the thousands of people involved in this action, three individuals were absolutely pivotal:

    The FAA observer who did the recce that confirmed Bismark had sailed.

    The USN bod in the Catalina who spotted Bismark when she was lost.

    Jock Moffat as above (big BZ to him).

    In spite of how it is portrayed in the film it does appear now that B was scuttled by her own people, as was presumably SOPs for the Hun following the precedents of Dresden (1914) and Graf Spee (1939).
     
  5. Met Ted Briggs the last survivor off the Hood in the Home Club in May 2007, he was carrying two pints and shuffling from the bar to his mates, good old boy. Once jack always jack.
    Sadly now passed away.
     
  6. I remember long time ago that a famous actor who served on the Hood missed the Hood when it departed. Any ideas who he was?

    Told our kid on the "mainland" to copy it.
     
  7. Hi BP1,

    'twas Jon Pertwee ("left hand down a bit"):

    Discussed recently here http://www.navy-net.co.uk/Forums/viewtopic/t=9875.html

    It must be True Dit because it is included in several of the Jon Pertwee websites, obituaries, etc.
     
  8. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    For those who like picky detail, the final shots showing the Jerries jumping over the side were shot on board HMS Newfoundland, home for full due and laid up in Fountain Lake. The after funnel visible at one pint is the giveaway. Also spotted a 277 aerial in one shot and of course all the usual pusser's doors and hatches etc at various points.
     
  9. ......and how about spot-the-bit-players among the supporting cast (no full credits in those days).

    ie Young Johnny Briggs/Corries Mike Baldwin with just a cheeky one-liner.)

    Great true story and an excellent film, despite it's inaccuracies and 'artistic license(s)'.



    During a week on the Vanguard in 1960 I was shown around the turrets and told that they had used for scenes of both RN & German loadings (using RN gunnery extras), so it was good to see them in use again after 50 years.


    Nostalgia - the 'I want it NOW' youngsters will just have wait their turn. :wink:
     
  10. That is one ship I would have liked to have a skeg round Bob, will have to make do with the near miss pic in the Still & West.
     
  11. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    I assumed it must have been Vanguard since there was nothing else left! The film producers were lucky to get her before she popped into the Still and West for a last pint on her way to the breakers.
     
  12. A little more than mere 'Luck', Seaweed.......

    << ....Producer John Brabourne was able to use his influence as son-in-law of Lord Mountbatten, then chief of the Defence Staff, to obtain the full co-operation of the Admiralty..... >>

    (From: http://www.channel4.com/history/microsites/H/history/e-h/film-sinkthebismarck.html )

    That film would have had the (intangible) result of pulling in more RN recruits than ever any recruiting budget could have wished for!

    Crafty or what? :wink:
     
  13. Seaweed

    Seaweed War Hero Book Reviewer

    Fair call, Breathers, I'd missed the significance of that. Lord M was always very keen on the film industry anyway and set up the availablity of films for the Fleet and was chums with such as C Chaplin & N Coward. SUCH a pity Brabourne didn't run the script past people who could have called out the ghastly dialogue, and playing games with the facts for no good reason, although I do see that for a film the Swordfish driver might not have wanted to perform in seas that were pitching the flight deck up and down sixty feet.

    Oh and Bismark had a pusser's twin Bofors at one point.
     
  14. Cheers Bob, I will be in the S&W at the beginning of June if you are passing....... :eek:ccasion5:
     
  15. I was onboard Vanguard, head quarters ship of Reserve Fleet, when they shot "Sink the Bismark". Y turret was used for the big gun scenes. One gun was the "English" and the other was the "German". Lots of the ships company were used as extras. The scene where the German PO shouts "Raus", "Raus", was shot in the canteen flat. On the first take the camera zoomed in on sleepy sailor getting out of his mick, but the scene had to be shot again because the sailor had his name sewn on his nix in Red Silk! Now, I wonder where that came from!
     
  16. Quality dit!

    They have used a few Pusser's greys as film sets over the years, anyone got any dits from the 23 they used in James Bond? Also wasn't Fearless in a Bond Film too?
     
  17. 2dd

    HMS Fearless appears in "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) as the ship which picks up Bond's escape pod.

    HMS Westminster was used for "Tomorrow Never Dies" (1997).
     

  18. My old ship HMS Tenby was featured in 'You only live twice'
    Where Commander Bond was buried at sea. (He wasn't really..... but you all knew that. :wink:
     
  19. FD

    That part of the film is meant to be taking place off Hong Kong but it was actually filmed off Gib.
     

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