SIFT Help?

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Just say "no".

Be aware however that as a Warfare Officer (Aircrew), you could be offered submarines if you do not make selection as aircrew or indeed be appointed to a submarine later in your career if you stick around long enough.

I'd be inclined to use diplomacy (not a word I use often as a Stoker). Something along the lines of: "My first preference Branch is aircrew and whilst I am aware I could be offered a place as a submariner, it would not be my preferred option. Should this occur however, I would give it consideration".
 

ExonOxon

Midshipman
Hello all, another question.

I've got my sift in a few days and I've been thinking about potential answers to the personal questions. If they ask about a leadership experience that went wrong I could talk about when I was Senior Watch Leader on an URNU deployment and planning the cocktail party. At during the preparations I was trying to do too much myself and it was starting to look like it was going to all fall down because of it when my MEO pulled me aside and said "you're not delegating enough, you can't do it all yourself. Lead everyone, don't do everything." I realised he was 100% correct and I starting delegating properly and supervising and the preparations went from dysfunctional to smooth as anything and the event went off really well. I took the lesson very much to heart and its one of my most vivid memories from that deployment. Would it be good to mention this as it shows that I know how to listen to advice and learn from mistakes, and that I also now know the importance of good delegation more than someone who's not been through a similar experience, or would it detriment me as it would be seen as a mistake that someone who's "officer material" wouldn't have made?

Also if they ask about determination and the fitness test, I used not to be a very sporty person at all and when I initially starting training for my naval application learning to turn off my mind during phys was a real challenge that took some determination to break through. I've done it now, I found the PJFT perfectly fine and I really enjoy my phys, but again, would it be good because it shows I'm determined and will stick at something when it's important, or would it be bad because a "good"candidate would have been sporty and athletic in the first place?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
I took the lesson very much to heart and its one of my most vivid memories from that deployment. Would it be good to mention this as it shows that I know how to listen to advice and learn from mistakes, and that I also now know the importance of good delegation more than someone who's not been through a similar experience, or would it detriment me as it would be seen as a mistake that someone who's "officer material" wouldn't have made?
AIB don't expect the finished article or BRNC would be superfluous. It's a good example to give as it shows humility & the willingness to change your style of management to achieve the goal.

Also if they ask about determination and the fitness test, I used not to be a very sporty person at all and when I initially starting training for my naval application learning to turn off my mind during phys was a real challenge that took some determination to break through. I've done it now, I found the PJFT perfectly fine and I really enjoy my phys, but again, would it be good because it shows I'm determined and will stick at something when it's important, or would it be bad because a "good"candidate would have been sporty and athletic in the first place?

The former.

A tip: Try to be succinct.

Good luck.
 

ExonOxon

Midshipman
Thank Ninja. As ever, you are the guardian angel of applicants.

Will do my best to be succinct. Waffling can be a weakness of mine, but I'm aware of it and will do my best to combat it in the interview!
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Will do my best to be succinct. Waffling can be a weakness of mine, but I'm aware of it and will do my best to combat it in the interview!
We all do it, fear not, but at interview if you don't know something, just be upfront and say "I don't know." If you have a rough idea, follow it up with "What I do know is..."

Good luck.
 

Booner123

War Hero
Hi Exon,

I used examples of how experiences turned me into a better person much like the ones you just described and I passed my interview last week.
Like Ninja said, they're looking for potential not perfection.

Good luck with your interview, let us know how it goes.


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ExonOxon

Midshipman
Hello again,

I've got my Sift tomorrow but there are two things I couldn't find on the internet. What happens to recruits who get injured during training (eg at BRNC) and how long is your second commission? Any help would be much appreciated.


Also, for sensors of ships is it good enough to know the 45 has Sampson and Surface Ship Torpedo Defence systems and that most ships have multiple types of sonar and radar along with an IFF, or do I have to be able to rattle off all the different types of sensors on each class of ship?
 

Booner123

War Hero
Are you applying for Officer or Rating?

Also I had no questions on either weapons systems or sensors in my interview so I couldn't comment on that one.


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Booner123

War Hero
My apologies, when writing the response I neglected your first question, of course you're apply for office seen as you asked about BRNC.

Can't tell you what happens to injured recruits I'm afraid however your initial commission as an officer is 12 years, this can then be extended to 16 years (+ 4 years) and then extended again to the rest of your career.


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ExonOxon

Midshipman
Thanks Booner, that's really helpful.


Interesting to hear you say you got no weapons systems questions. Roughly how much of your interview was personal/ leadership questions and how much was Navy knowledge questions?
 

Booner123

War Hero
There were four sections in mine, the first was my motivation for wanting to join the armed forces and why specifically the Royal Navy.

The second was to do with Navy knowledge, he showed me a load of pictures of different ships, aircraft and landing craft from all branches so surface fleet, FAA, RFA and the Royal Marines so make sure you can tell which ship is which from pictures. Current Naval affairs is a big one along with which ship is where. (When I was asked about current naval affairs I specifically told the interviewer which Naval ships were where at the time, this prevents him/her from asking questions on locations of specific ships, more importantly the ones you don't know about.) My training pipeline came up in this section and he wanted to know everything I knew about Dartmouth and then my specialisation so make sure you know this like the back of your hand, if not better.

Thirdly I was asked about my leadership experience. I felt like he spent more time on this section than the others so I would make sure you have firm examples. I don't want to alarm you but also be prepared to answer questions you haven't thought of/ found on here. I was asked "What are the pro's and con's of delegation" that threw me a little but I answered and he nodded encouragingly. So be prepared to think on your feet and don't be scared to ask if you can just have a minute to think. It's better than sitting in silence whilst the interviewer wonders what on earth you are doing. Obviously don't say it for every question but you get what I mean.

Finally was the mandatory questions part, how do you feel about taking a human life?, Do you understand the Royal Navies policy on drugs? and how do they police it? (I didn't know that part but it's just random drugs tests) and would you serve on a submarine etc etc.

I would say each of the sections 1, 2 and 4 he spent the same amount of time on with him spending an extra five or ten minutes on section 3 (leadership examples).

All in all I really quite enjoyed the interview and if asked to I would quite happily do it again.

I can't tell you not to be nervous but just try to relax and enjoy it, after all you're having a conversation about your future career, it's something you should be deeply interested in and want to talk about.

Good luck tomorrow and be sure to let us know how it goes, who know, I might just see you at AIB.



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