Shortage of seatime?

#1
This puzzled me - but possibly its common nowadays - taking a cruise a while ago (P&O) came across a couple of RN lieutenants who seemed to be watchkeeping ,these guys wore uniform, have since seen what appeared to be similar but in civvies?. Could it be that we have fallen to this to get hands on experience of the oggin?
Theres no doubt that the people who wish to join in order to 'go to sea' would be better off in the Merchant - with 30,000 personnel we are fast approaching stagnation for all ranks (not enough turnover without some forced redundancy every couple of years).
 
#3
Possibly big timing RNR Officers who worked for P&O?

To be fair they are gonna get to **** a lot more desperate middle aged passengers and cabaret girls in their RN rig.
 

Seaweed

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#4
Long ago there used to be some sort of attachment programme to give RN officers an acquaint with the Merch. If the bods you saw were RNR, they would still have worn P&O rig when they were P&O-ing. Actually P&O officers' rig used to be very like RN, at least in blues.
 
#7
It is true. Whilst on the Mersey we had a Warfare Mid join us from a P&O cruise liner. He said his appointer couldn't offer him a ship at the time, so he was packed off to enjoy cocktail parties with the SAGA louts.
 
#8
Mate of mine is a S/LT still under training and after his second lot of fleet time he spent a week on the TS Jack Petchey(or some similar name) to get more navigation experience!!
 
#9
Long ago there used to be some sort of attachment programme to give RN officers an acquaint with the Merch. If the bods you saw were RNR, they would still have worn P&O rig when they were P&O-ing. Actually P&O officers' rig used to be very like RN, at least in blues.
There still is. It is the Merchant Navy liaison voyage scheme or some similar title. I think it is Officers only (not sure on that) and is arranged via Career Managers if a suitable period of time can be found. There are notices about it in OALs every now and again. It isn't to get sea time it is to learn about how our merchant colleagues operate. Most placements are not on cruise ships, but some are.
 
#10
It's more common than you think, although Cruise Liners are a lesser choice. It's mainly because we don't spend enough time off shore (going in a straight line) that allows baby Dabber Officers conduct proper astro-navigation. I was very lucky, and joined a H boat crossing the Atlantic, and thus could do Morning Stars, Sunrise, Sun-Run-Sun, Sunset, Evening Stars and a Moon Sight for about 3 weeks, and keep a DR running. Hell, by the end of it I could reduce sights by hand (the Jimmy was a Spec N!), and had no problem at IWOC. Unfortunately, FF/DDs tend to spend to long haring around, thus destroying any chance of a decent DR. MVs/Cruise Ships go from A-B, allowing that to be checked out.
 
#11
There still is. It is the Merchant Navy liaison voyage scheme or some similar title. I think it is Officers only (not sure on that) and is arranged via Career Managers if a suitable period of time can be found. There are notices about it in OALs every now and again. It isn't to get sea time it is to learn about how our merchant colleagues operate. Most placements are not on cruise ships, but some are.
Royal Navy Community Web site
 

Seaweed

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#12
Well that scheme has a long history! I learned about it from a lecture on the MN given at Dartmouth by one of the Dart's House Officers, a rather precious Lt called William Staveley (actually by the Darts called 'Syph-sticks') who was recounting his experiences on an MN famil. The high spot was my mate Mick Davis who went to sleep in the front row (we were worked damned hard). Staveley let fly with "The Merchant Navy are at least gentlemen!" at which point Mick awoke. Mick was later sacked from Manadon allegedly because his skiffle group* had priority with him over engineering, WS went on to be 1SL.

*Lonnie Donegan, washboard, string bass etc for you youngsters.

P&O I met later, lavish grub on board Chusan and later Canton** when invoited on board by their Thirds.

** passenger liners, Port out, Starboard home, something that used to exist.
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#13
This puzzled me - but possibly its common nowadays - taking a cruise a while ago (P&O) came across a couple of RN lieutenants who seemed to be watchkeeping...
Possibly FAA occifers - I always understood that WAFUs were on a frippin' cruise anyway, so... (mind you, WTF would they know about Bridge watchkeeping?!) :? :wink:
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

New Posts

Top