Ship based deployment for WARSEARES

Discussion in 'Royal Naval Reserve (RNR)' started by paulb1912, Aug 27, 2008.

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  1. Hi

    I have over last 10 months being part of the RNR, I was in RN in early 90's for 6 years. Since I have joined the RNR i have heard storie of RNR persons who when joining ships for what ever duties they have been assigned have been basically being ignored or seen as useful as a chocolate tea pot. I have heard of persons who have been drafted to a ship being used to clean heads etc

    Now I will say dont believe everything I hear but what i will say is when we had a ships visit on Northumberland whilst at Raleigh half of the SC looked at us as if we had five heads, whilst the rest took time out to explain things etc and were very interested in helping us and asnwering questions etc

    I remember my time in the nineties when we had visits from army bods whilst in the Adriatic and were treated like kings or when we had visits from RNR bods whilst in Pompey

    Surely if we are doing a task which free's up RN persons to get on with there own branch jobs and runs ashore then they would welcome it with open arms and embrace it, i remeber doing sentry on the flight deck 1 in 7 and was dually peed off at doing it..
  2. Sorry, but is there a question in there?
  3. yeah sorry

    has anyone found on a deployment for the RNR any problems with full time RN persons
  4. FlagWagger

    FlagWagger Book Reviewer

    The worst I got was being referred to as "civvy bastard" by one RN SR while I was on board - just ignored it and got on with my job (different part of ship) and took a full part in all mess activities. Received grudging respect from said SR by end of trip. Basically, show willing in your branch and in mess life and the fact that you're RNR will soon fade from view - wasn't it the same in the RN that new crew members had to earn the respect of their peers on joining?
  5. tiddlyoggy

    tiddlyoggy War Hero Book Reviewer

    Couldn't agree more. It's all down to the individual in question, some will get on others not. Just get stuck in and people will accept you. You are different to regulars, therefore they will regard you with a certain amount of suspicion, but the more you join in the more you will be accepted.
  6. back in early 2000 b4 i got my hook i was out in south america on a 42 as a lowly sa1 rnr. the usual civvy jibe and waste of space bounced around. that was until the aircon went down and the ME/WE branch plus tiffs and officers couldnt sort it after two days. this useless ab went and sorted it in 45 min.
  7. All I did was tell them that I got 1.5 x standard pay if I turned to after 4:00 pm to explain my enthusiasm. The PO's Mess got so sulky that it took me 2 days before I could admit the truth that I just loved the job.
  8. The entire WE branch as well?

    Were you ever a cook on a Yankee battleship?
  10. I've seen both the good and the bad sides of the how the RN treat the RNR.

    I always do my best to show willing and many on board appreciate that.

    Sometimes it only takes one popular Jack on board to turn a mess against the RNR. All you can do is your best and prove to them that you're there to try to lighten their load.

    Granted sometimes it may take a couple of days for them to familiarise you with the ship/your responsibilities etc but after that you should be an asset.

    On one ship i was on there was one bloke who disliked the RNR before we set foot on board and did his best to turn the whole comms dept against us. After a few days you give up trying to bring them round and just get on with what you're there for.

    edited to add - I must admit that this kind of reaction is in the minority. Mostly the RN are very helpful and welcoming.
  11. I just think it's a question of using your common sense when going on board. Keep your head down for a few days until you're more confident in what you're doing, and let the guys on board see that you're keen and willing to learn, and might actually have something to contribute. In my 13 years I've heard comments from all ends of the spectrum, from "I've got no respect for you people at all", to "At last, they've sent us someone who knows what he's doing".

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