Selly Oak & RNH Haslar

So now that Haslar is an NHS hospital, how long will it be before we see the cleaning contract being revised (that is passed on to a cheaper alternative that doesn't actual have to keep the hospital clean).
 
come_the_day said:
[quote="wardmaster
the principally required specialties gain the best experience day-to-day in the NHS.

Wrong again! The principally required specialities, Surgery and Anaesthesia, gain the best experience in Field Hospitals.

Why are you using a different name? Are you just confused? :D
 
wardmaster said:
come_the_day said:
[quote="wardmaster
the principally required specialties gain the best experience day-to-day in the NHS.

Wrong again! The principally required specialities, Surgery and Anaesthesia, gain the best experience in Field Hospitals.

Why are you using a different name? Are you just confused? :D

Nope. I have an account on my work PC and one at home. Too lazy to see if I can combine them and still get my work access.

I'll grant you that surgery and anaesthetics are as important as intensive care and trauma, but the experience gained on ops does not fulfil the whole requirement in either specialty, unless the individual remains on ops for the whole time, rather than the 6 weeks or so that consultants currently do. Most Service doctors, nurses and medics are employed within NHS facilities for most of their time, so it surely makes sense that they should be somewhere beneficial for the development of their experience. Anybody who really thinks that sufficient experience was provided in either of the old Services hospitals should ditch their rose-tint, because it just isn't true.
 
asst_dep_to_dep_asst said:
wardmaster said:
come_the_day said:
[quote="wardmaster
the principally required specialties gain the best experience day-to-day in the NHS.

Wrong again! The principally required specialities, Surgery and Anaesthesia, gain the best experience in Field Hospitals.

Why are you using a different name? Are you just confused? :D

Nope. I have an account on my work PC and one at home. Too lazy to see if I can combine them and still get my work access.

I'll grant you that surgery and anaesthetics are as important as intensive care and trauma, but the experience gained on ops does not fulfil the whole requirement in either specialty, unless the individual remains on ops for the whole time, rather than the 6 weeks or so that consultants currently do. Most Service doctors, nurses and medics are employed within NHS facilities for most of their time, so it surely makes sense that they should be somewhere beneficial for the development of their experience. Anybody who really thinks that sufficient experience was provided in either of the old Services hospitals should ditch their rose-tint, because it just isn't true.

Ok, I give you all that; medical training and skills require a broad range of clinical material. But I still re-iterate my point (which you have never answered) that Armed Services wards in NHS Hospitals were sold on the basis that service personnel would get priority but that never happened. And NHS managers were keen to see (because they lost money) that service hospitals never did get a broad range of clinical material and could therefore be criticised and then closed.
 
wardmaster said:
But I still re-iterate my point (which you have never answered) that Armed Services wards in NHS Hospitals were sold on the basis that service personnel would get priority but that never happened. And NHS managers were keen to see (because they lost money) that service hospitals never did get a broad range of clinical material and could therefore be criticised and then closed.

I haven't really got an answer, because I don't recognise what you are stating as fact. As far as I am aware, there was no agreement that the Services would have their own wards. Which Service personnel do you suggest were to get priority? Service patients were never going to displace higher priority civilian patients, but there is a priority route of access that costs more. Your point (b) is a bit fanciful and I think you are just trying to deflect the blame for closing Service hospitals onto the NHS, rather than where it really belongs. Much as they complain now, the General Staff's predecessors must have agreed to the situation changing, or it would only have happened amidst loud protest and I don't remember any of that.
 
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