Seamanship course

#1
apologies if this has already been answered, I have used to search tool to no avail. Please feel free to link it if the thread is elsewhere.

I was just wondering what the Seamanship Course entailed and how long this would be? Reading the career guide it states:

Professional training

Your preparation for this specialised technical job begins with a seamanship course, to develop your knowledge and practical skills. You’ll then complete four to six months’ sea training, gaining practical experience of life on board a modern warship, which will help you understand its military role and where you Fit into the team.

Does this mean I'll be going on to a ship theoretically weeks (?) after finishing Raleigh?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#2
Nope. Your seamanship course, after your first ten weeks, is about ten months at HMS Raleigh & HMS Collingwood before you are drafted to sea to consolidate your training. Top tip, learn Morse code inside out before you join because it will reap rewards during your training at Collingwood. Also, forget thinking you'll be spending most of your time zooming about in RIBs. You won't.
 
#3
I'd second the learn morse code, it will make the course a lot easier at collingwood, for the long days spent outside standing still looking up to a light trying to read the letter/number, and yes forget the all boats and guns it's far from that.
 
#4
Thanks Ninja! I assumed they wouldn't just throw Newbies on a ship but I didn't realise it would be 10 months either!

Thanks for the heads up on the morse code too, I better get cracking :confused:
 
#5
You will get a lot of practice before the exams, some people get it right away some takes long time, might be easy just reading one letter, but put a few words together than it gets harder at first, but you get a lot of help and when I went through the instructors would do out of hours practice so it's all down to yourself how hard you work.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#7
This is the official version.
Royal Navy website said:
Seaman Specialist

Once you’ve completed your basic training, you’ll spend the next 10 months training for your job as a seaman specialist; this will encompass a mixture of classroom and practical work. Through a series a courses first at HMS Collingwood and then HMS Raleigh you’ll learn how to communicate with other ships using visual morse code(flashing light), signal flags and short range radio, you will also develop the skills required to re-supply, anchor and berth Royal Navy ships. In addition you’ll be taught how to crew fast, rigid inflatable boats, operate short range weapon systems and vital safety equipment such as fire fighting apparatus. Once your training is complete you’ll be ready to gain practical experience at sea as part of a ship’s seaman specialist team.

As well as steering the ship, acting as a lookout and communicating with other ships via visual morse code (flashing light), signal flags and short range radio you’ll be a vital part of the fighting team when your ship goes into action. This could be either crewing the ship’s fast rigid inflatable boats or operating the high calibre machine guns. You will often be working outside on the ship’s safety equipment, preparing to re-supply, berth or anchor the ship. Conducting these tasks in all weather conditions makes this a real ‘life at sea’.
Did we mention the RIBs are fast?

Does it mention the cleaning or the menial upperdeck tasks such as oiling, greasing, chipping, painting?

As stated, it isn't all to do with boats. Far from it.
 
#8
This is the official version.

Did we mention the RIBs are fast?

Does it mention the cleaning or the menial upperdeck tasks such as oiling, greasing, chipping, painting?

As stated, it isn't all to do with boats. Far from it.
Does everyone do this training? I didn't think that they did but I can see how it would be helpful. I know you can be expected, and should expect, to carry out other tasks separate from your job role but as CT I can't imagine berthing or anchoring a ship very often lol :oops:
 
#9
Does it mention, the anchoring/specials late at night, than going on watch after, chipping and painting in all weathers, hoovering up puddles for when a admiral comes onboard, greasing. de rusting ships side in all weathers, long days from the bridge to the upper deck to internal cleaning to back on the bridge!

It's far from bowman in ribs
 
#10
You will get a lot of practice before the exams, some people get it right away some takes long time, might be easy just reading one letter, but put a few words together than it gets harder at first, but you get a lot of help and when I went through the instructors would do out of hours practice so it's all down to yourself how hard you work.
It's something that interests me quite a lot. I'm a very analytical person (apparently this was shown on my RT) so sitting and learning something like this is right up my street!!
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#11
Does everyone do this training? I didn't think that they did but I can see how it would be helpful. I know you can be expected, and should expect, to carry out other tasks separate from your job role but as CT I can't imagine berthing or anchoring a ship very often lol :oops:
The above is for Seaman Specialist, not Comms Tech!

The mention of the seamanship course without reference to Comms Tech in post#1 threw the thread completely out of whack.

My missus does this sort of thing. Analyses stuff in her head, then assumes I've read her mind and cracks-on with a a conversation halfway through her thought process ;)
 
#12
The above is for Seaman Specialist, not Comms Tech!

The mention of the seamanship course without reference to Comms Tech in post#1 threw the thread completely out of whack.

My missus does this sort of thing. Analyses stuff in her head, then assumes I've read her mind and cracks-on with a a conversation halfway through her thought process ;)
Oh dear !!! Sorry Ninja, I just assumed with your navel recruiting wisdom that you could also read minds!! Do you have any advice/info to offer in regards to the seamanship course post Raleigh/pre Ship draft for CT?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#13
No worries.

Comms Tech:

1. HMS RALEIGH - 10 week basic training.

2. HMS COLLINGWOOD for 18 week AB2(CT) Phase two course. This comprises working between Maritime Warfare School(MWS), Collingwood and Leydene within Collingwood, on a timetable centred at the MWS.

You will be at the Leydene for Morse Code training – in addition basic map skills and security training. Within MWS you'll learn touch typing and other communications based training. Within this 18 week period you do a week of Adventurous Training in Wales. After successfully passing the course exams, you pass out.

3. You THEN go to sea in an Initial Sea Training billet for 26 weeks, ideally on board a larger vessel, due to numbers and bed spaces. On ship, you'll complete the AB2 – AB1 task book and CBRNDC task book, as well as ship familiarisation. This could change in future.

4. You'll then go to Blandford Camp (Dorset) for five weeks preparation before going for intelligence training at Chicksands (Bedfordshire).

5. You'll be at Chicksands (Bedford) for 19 weeks of training, learning about radio theory and signals analysis.

6. You will then undertake the three week Leading Rates Command Course at Collingwood.

7.On completion, you'll stay at Collingwood to conduct a basic equipment course. You'll then join a ship to consolidate your training.

8.That consolidation period is about nine months, after which you will get your first full sea draft.

9.At this stage, pending all task books complete, you are an AB1 and trained strength.

10. You are advanced to Leading Hand nine months after completing Chicksands.

11.From this point forward you are on a select, train & promote scheme.

Within the CT specialisation, there are a number of sub-specialisations which ratings can chose during their careers: Languages, Sigs, Cyber, Intelligence.

An aptitude test must be taken before any language training commences, which in itself lasts a couple of years (ish). Languages taught are varied and diverse.

Can't tell you anymore than that unfortunately.
 
#14
No worries.

Comms Tech:

1. HMS RALEIGH - 10 week basic training.

2. HMS COLLINGWOOD for 18 week AB2(CT) Phase two course. This comprises working between Maritime Warfare School(MWS), Collingwood and Leydene within Collingwood, on a timetable centred at the MWS.

You will be at the Leydene for Morse Code training – in addition basic map skills and security training. Within MWS you'll learn touch typing and other communications based training. Within this 18 week period you do a week of Adventurous Training in Wales. After successfully passing the course exams, you pass out.

3. You THEN go to sea in an Initial Sea Training billet for 26 weeks, ideally on board a larger vessel, due to numbers and bed spaces. On ship, you'll complete the AB2 – AB1 task book and CBRNDC task book, as well as ship familiarisation. This could change in future.

4. You'll then go to Blandford Camp (Dorset) for five weeks preparation before going for intelligence training at Chicksands (Bedfordshire).

5. You'll be at Chicksands (Bedford) for 19 weeks of training, learning about radio theory and signals analysis.

6. You will then undertake the three week Leading Rates Command Course at Collingwood.

7.On completion, you'll stay at Collingwood to conduct a basic equipment course. You'll then join a ship to consolidate your training.

8.That consolidation period is about nine months, after which you will get your first full sea draft.

9.At this stage, pending all task books complete, you are an AB1 and trained strength.

10. You are advanced to Leading Hand nine months after completing Chicksands.

11.From this point forward you are on a select, train & promote scheme.

Within the CT specialisation, there are a number of sub-specialisations which ratings can chose during their careers: Languages, Sigs, Cyber, Intelligence.

An aptitude test must be taken before any language training commences, which in itself lasts a couple of years (ish). Languages taught are varied and diverse.

Can't tell you anymore than that unfortunately.
You, sir, are a King!! Exactly what i was looking for!! See, we knew it was in there somewhere ;):p
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
#15
Touch typing is something else you can get some practice at, I'm an old school ex LRO and can still remember back in 1960 having to learn the morse code and touch typing, from scratch, touch typing was taught to music with a back up aide of a shortened billiard cue, if you were caught looking at the typewriter keys you got a nudge with the cue, its amazing how quickly you lost the urge to look down. I did try pointing out that the letters on the keys were all blacked out, that was painful as well. I suspect that the training aide (cue) is no longer in use.
The hardest part comes when reading morse and typing it, so if you have mastered typing before hand things are a bit easier.
 
#16
Touch typing is something else you can get some practice at, I'm an old school ex LRO and can still remember back in 1960 having to learn the morse code and touch typing, from scratch, touch typing was taught to music with a back up aide of a shortened billiard cue, if you were caught looking at the typewriter keys you got a nudge with the cue, its amazing how quickly you lost the urge to look down. I did try pointing out that the letters on the keys were all blacked out, that was painful as well. I suspect that the training aide (cue) is no longer in use.
The hardest part comes when reading morse and typing it, so if you have mastered typing before hand things are a bit easier.
Thanks for this Janner. I'm currently 7 years in admin with a keyboard that lost its letters a few years back! Touch typing I think I've got down to a T! That's one less thing to worry about at least :D
 
#17
Don't do it, I'm on My course atm and it is absolute ****, trying to branch transfer to AET Ahahah, but you spend 22 weeks at collingwood doing Morse code, Visual signalling and fleet work etc flags and crap like that, then at Raleigh you do seamanship and GPMG training etc
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#18
Don't do it, I'm on My course atm and it is absolute ****, trying to branch transfer to AET Ahahah, but you spend 22 weeks at collingwood doing Morse code, Visual signalling and fleet work etc flags and crap like that, then at Raleigh you do seamanship and GPMG training etc
Are you a Comms Tech or Sea Spec? Why do you no longer wish to be in the branch?
 
#19
Sea Spec, it's not what I expected when I first signed up, my All the people at collingwood I have talked to that are sea specs do not have good things to say about it, just generally don't enjoy what I'm doing at the moment, too easy and not interesting to me, but I originally signed up as air-crewman but failed flight aptitude, so always wanted to go as wafu at some point
 

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