Sea Vixen Crash - 20 Jan 1960

stickybomb

Midshipman
There's a text file on a de Havilland site out there on t'interweb which lists this particular Venom (XG658) as "w/o 20.10.59".

Sowassatallaboutthen? Does 'w/o' mean written off? If so, is it likely that the dates are wrong? I'm not sure of the provenance of this file but it looks like an unofficial compilation judging by the 'last seen at...' entries for some airframes.
 

Waspie

War Hero
stickybomb said:
Bergen said:
Yes - every single one of the headstones at Arlington are single white slabs with curved tops.

Actually, not quite. There is a section near the back gate that's full of those gothic monstrosities you usually see in rural French graveyards. Some are quite modern. Certainly couldn't be mistaken for crosses though, so Bergen's point stands.

It was in the last century Arlington standardised the headstones. The earlier part of the grounds are a bit higgidly pigildy as it was post Civil War.

The grounds of Arlington being handed down as a cemetary dedicated to the fallen military of the nation by a Confederate general, (name eludes me right now). Kennedy's grave is sited below the windows of Arlington house. Within the grounds is a mast from the USS Missouri I believe from Pearl Harbour.

If your in Washington it's well worth a visit. The civilian space shuttle crew were the first civilians to be allowed to be buried there. Arlington also houses there tomb of the unknown warrior which is guarded over by an Honour Guard 24/7.
 

Waspie

War Hero
stickybomb said:
Waspie said:
The civilian space shuttle crew were the first civilians to be allowed to be buried there.

Aren't senators entitled to be buried there?

Unsure! I was quoting from the guide that took us around the place.

Presidents can for sure as they are Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces - Senators - don't know. Perhaps yes if they have service time behind them.
 

Bergen

ADC
Dicky said:
A very touching true story I must admit. I also thought this was poignant:

There are no flowers on a submarine's grave, no tributes last long on the ocean's wave. The only salute is a seagull and it sweeps, and the tears that drop when a loved one weeps.

An obvious loss of two good and stout souls - R.I.P.

Kipling

We have fed our sea for a thousand years
And she calls us, still unfed,
Though there's never a wave of all her waves
But marks our English dead:
We have strawed our best to the weed's unrest,
To the shark and the sheering gull.
If blood be the price of admiralty,
Lord God, we ha' paid in full!

There's never a flood goes shoreward now
But lifts a keel we manned;
There's never an ebb goes seaward now
But drops our dead on the sand --
But slinks our dead on the sands forlore,
From the Ducies to the Swin.
If blood be the price of admiralty,
If blood be the price of admiralty,
Lord God, we ha' paid it in!

We must feed our sea for a thousand years,
For that is our doom and pride,
As it was when they sailed with the ~Golden Hind~,
Or the wreck that struck last tide --
Or the wreck that lies on the spouting reef
Where the ghastly blue-lights flare.
If blood be the price of admiralty,
If blood be the price of admiralty,
If blood be the price of admiralty,
Lord God, we ha' bought it fair!
 

2_deck_dash

War Hero
Waspie said:
stickybomb said:
Bergen said:
Yes - every single one of the headstones at Arlington are single white slabs with curved tops.

Actually, not quite. There is a section near the back gate that's full of those gothic monstrosities you usually see in rural French graveyards. Some are quite modern. Certainly couldn't be mistaken for crosses though, so Bergen's point stands.

It was in the last century Arlington standardised the headstones. The earlier part of the grounds are a bit higgidly pigildy as it was post Civil War.

The grounds of Arlington being handed down as a cemetary dedicated to the fallen military of the nation by a Confederate general, (name eludes me right now). Kennedy's grave is sited below the windows of Arlington house. Within the grounds is a mast from the USS Missouri I believe from Pearl Harbour.

If your in Washington it's well worth a visit. The civilian space shuttle crew were the first civilians to be allowed to be buried there. Arlington also houses there tomb of the unknown warrior which is guarded over by an Honour Guard 24/7.

Close.

The mast is actually from USS Maine which exploded and sank in 1898 with the loss of 266 men, plus another 8 who died later from wounds.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Maine_(ACR-1)
 

stickybomb

Midshipman
Right chaps, time for an update and summary for those interested.

From what I have gathered, a number of 766 Sqn crews were flying training sorties from Yeovilton when a blizzard closed in and emergency recoveries were staged at airfields all over the area.

My uncle's Venom crashed through some trees, crossed a field and came to rest in a wood at a place called Court Farm near Tockenham, Wilts whilst on a GCA into Lyneham. During the approach, he probably saw that the GCA advice differed from his instrument readings and chose to believe his instruments. The inquiry found that the aircraft's instruments had frozen.

Tony passed out of Brittannia in July 1953 a matter of hours after being told that his father—an RAF Wing Commander and pre-war Sergeant pilot— had suffered a fatal heart attack whilst on exercise in Germany the day before. He chose not to tell his mother until after the ceremony.

Tony died four months before his only son was born.

Thank you to all those who helped with the research.
 

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