Sea time

#1
A chap at work told me the other day that his brother who is in boats hasnt been to sea now since 2003.
I just wondered if this was unusual and how do you keep yourself up to date etc in regards to sea time service practices.

Just wondering because in my job you have to keep up clinical practice otherwise you lose your registration as well as the clinical experience you gain from practicing.

Is there anything to keep sea skills up or is it a case of on the job refreshers?
 
#2
rod-gearing said:
A chap at work told me the other day that his brother who is in boats hasnt been to sea now since 2003.
I just wondered if this was unusual and how do you keep yourself up to date etc in regards to sea time service practices.

Just wondering because in my job you have to keep up clinical practice otherwise you lose your registration as well as the clinical experience you gain from practicing.

Is there anything to keep sea skills up or is it a case of on the job refreshers?
 
#3
ex_rubberdagger said:
rod-gearing said:
A chap at work told me the other day that his brother who is in boats hasnt been to sea now since 2003.
I just wondered if this was unusual and how do you keep yourself up to date etc in regards to sea time service practices.

Just wondering because in my job you have to keep up clinical practice otherwise you lose your registration as well as the clinical experience you gain from practicing.

Is there anything to keep sea skills up or is it a case of on the job refreshers?
Do they?? I havent had an update since Nov 2006 and the kind people at WMAS have got rid of our training facility and given us our training package on a disc. Yeah BZ WMAS, bunch of cnuts!!
Now,now I'll tell Tony .You know you dont mean it really.
 
#5
ex_rubberdagger said:
rod-gearing said:
A chap at work told me the other day that his brother who is in boats hasnt been to sea now since 2003.
I just wondered if this was unusual and how do you keep yourself up to date etc in regards to sea time service practices.

Just wondering because in my job you have to keep up clinical practice otherwise you lose your registration as well as the clinical experience you gain from practicing.

Is there anything to keep sea skills up or is it a case of on the job refreshers?
The most recent Chief to leave Yeovilton on pension ( 34 years) only ever served at sea for fewer than 6 months of that time.
 

x4nd

Lantern Swinger
#6
athwartship said:
The most recent Chief to leave Yeovilton on pension ( 34 years) only ever served at sea for fewer than 6 months of that time.
Very interesting, but I’m not sure it’s really anything to do with submarines?

:dwarf:
 
#7
x4nd said:
athwartship said:
The most recent Chief to leave Yeovilton on pension ( 34 years) only ever served at sea for fewer than 6 months of that time.
Very interesting, but I’m not sure it’s really anything to do with submarines?

:dwarf:
That's right .
His fewer than 6 months sea time was NOT served in submarines
 
#8
I don't think you get many Lt Cdrs over the age of 35 at sea these days, so that means 20 years ashore before you retire then maybe RO2 job until 65. Now if only I had stayed on at school and got a decent education instead of joining the big G at 15.
 

x4nd

Lantern Swinger
#9
athwartship said:
x4nd said:
athwartship said:
The most recent Chief to leave Yeovilton on pension ( 34 years) only ever served at sea for fewer than 6 months of that time.
Very interesting, but I’m not sure it’s really anything to do with submarines?

:dwarf:
That's right .
His fewer than 6 months sea time was NOT served in submarines
Hence the relevance on a Submarines thread I guess?

:rendeer:
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
#10
stan_the_man said:
I don't think you get many Lt Cdrs over the age of 35 at sea these days, so that means 20 years ashore before you retire then maybe RO2 job until 65. Now if only I had stayed on at school and got a decent education instead of joining the big G at 15.
I don't think they have RO2's anymore, they call them CIS or somesuch
 
#11
janner said:
stan_the_man said:
I don't think you get many Lt Cdrs over the age of 35 at sea these days, so that means 20 years ashore before you retire then maybe RO2 job until 65. Now if only I had stayed on at school and got a decent education instead of joining the big G at 15.
I don't think they have RO2's anymore, they call them CIS or somesuch
Bunting Tossers?
 
#12
onI meant retired officers shippers they keep the uniform loose the x factor and get even bigger pensions. Then they really do start to smell of piss and talcum powder
 
#13
x4nd said:
athwartship said:
The most recent Chief to leave Yeovilton on pension ( 34 years) only ever served at sea for fewer than 6 months of that time.
Very interesting, but I’m not sure it’s really anything to do with submarines?

:dwarf:
I suppose he could have been on the M2! :thumright:
 
#14
Assuming one is medically fit...

Submarine pay will be reduced (there is a higher rate and a lower rate) if you spend longer than three years inboard...

You may also go out of date for nuc pay after a period of time and will therefore lose that little incentive.

You should also get the tick in the box from SETT at regular intervals or you may lose your submarine pay....I think.

As for keeping 'in date' with sea practices...I would think generally speaking that it is on a 'need to' basis. Me? I don't need to, but I need to know the machinations of the various branches and all the policy in Phase two training. How to recover from a port non essential failure just isn't an issue for me!! :w00t:
 
#15
i aint been to see since 2005 and with my next shore draft already stamped by drafty I'm not likely to until at least 2013.

why am i telling a submariner - fukcin hell i'm telling everyone
 
#16
Polto said:
Assuming one is medically fit...

Submarine pay will be reduced (there is a higher rate and a lower rate) if you spend longer than three years inboard...

You may also go out of date for nuc pay after a period of time and will therefore lose that little incentive.

You should also get the tick in the box from SETT at regular intervals or you may lose your submarine pay....I think.

As for keeping 'in date' with sea practices...I would think generally speaking that it is on a 'need to' basis. Me? I don't need to, but I need to know the machinations of the various branches and all the policy in Phase two training. How to recover from a port non essential failure just isn't an issue for me!! :w00t:
Close, but not close enough.

Yes, you drop to the reserve band of s/m pay if you spend too long inboard, unless it is a submarine essential continuity billet.

Nuclear pay is directly linked to submarine pay, you take a drop in s/m pay, you get an automatic drop in nuc pay.

S/m pay is no longer tied to SETT qualification for submariners (though there is a continuing requirement for seagoing submariners to remain in-date SETT), however, there are non-submariners who may be paid s/m pay for periods spent at sea on a boat for which sucessful recent completion of SETT is a pre-req.

Nuclear propulsion plant Manouevering Room watchkeepers are required to keep in date in their relevant simulator, furthermore, watchkeepers who do not keep in date for 'Critical' watchkeeping face requalification boards before they can resume watchkeeping on a critical plant.

Hope this clarifies things a bit.
 
#17
Looking to join and at the AIB process, was asking out of the three roles marine engineering officer, weapon engineerin subarine and fleet, which one has the least amount of sea time?
 
#20
-Posting on two threads, not wanting to go to sea apparantly, maybe the Army would be a better bet.
Or the RAF, but if he really wants RN then WAFU but with 2 carriers to man WAFU may not be as cushy as it has been.
But for completeness if you don't want to do sea time don't join a maritime service.
 
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