School hands out 345 morning-after pills to students

Discussion in 'Diamond Lil's' started by slim, Apr 30, 2007.

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  1. well i think its a good idea......... too many young girls these days are struggling to live a so called " normal " life because of a baby....
    and there are even young lads that will help to look after a unexpected baby......... how many more poor mites will be left out in the cold because a girl is too afraid to tell her parents... i,think more schools should do this.. and yes i say this as a mum of a 13 girl........
     
  2. It amazes me to learn that people in these days of HIV infection and with syphillis on the increase, still have unprotected sex.
    I have heard we have the highest rates of young people ( I hate the word teenager ) becoming pregnant or contracting STI's among the EU countries.
    If that is the case we should be thoroughly ashamed of ourselves, and well done to all those who work in this sector seeking to prevent such things.
     
  3. wet_blobby

    wet_blobby War Hero Moderator

    Why should we all be ashamed of ourselves? I thought having a dose was a right of passage as a young thruster....c'mon own up there's more than just me on here who's had a dose.... :oops:
     
  4. Why not 345 Condoms and give classes on how to use them???? 8O
    I have had several young girls rock up to A&E asking for the morning-after pill. They all need to have a primary assessment done to rule out potential contra-indications to this medication. At the end of the day IT IS a medication and should not be handed out like smarties. The morning-after pill DOES NOT, and I say again DOES NOT, protect you from STD's. STD's in turn can render many young girls infertile in later life.
    While I am in complete favour of more extensive sex education in schools, I do have an issue with this particular solution. It's another bandaid solution of a problem that kids need to be educated about.
    It's the perverbial 'Don't step on the grass' scenario isn't it? I would rather personally see kids know how to have sex safely, then take a McMorning Pill and potentially have their physical/sexual health compromised.
     

  5. Because CONDOMS are no good after the event :)
     
  6. I toltaly agree with you pinta ....... the pill does prevent pregnacy ,but does not stop deseases,,which can destroy the young persons life and anyones else they sleep with......... i have already had the big bad talk with my girl about the use of condoms....and hopefully she will have the sence to use them ,,,even better wait till she's at least 50 before she has sex........
     
  7. IS it totally out of the question that both options are provided?
     
  8. My point is that condoms are the safest way to have to have sex. The morning after pill was developed as a safe guard for women in the event that sex was not consensual, i.e rape, or in the event that other forms of contraception have failed in some way. The morning-after pill in itself IS NOT a form of contraception. It should only be used as a backup, not as the solution. There are safer and cheaper options when teaching kids about safe sex.
     
  9. If youread the article you will find that both options are provided.
    I think that the school is providing an excellent service, we need more like it.
     
  10. Aussiepint wrote:-
    My point is that condoms are the safest way to have to have sex. The morning after pill was developed as a safe guard for women in the event that sex was not consensual, i.e rape, or in the event that other forms of contraception have failed in some way. The morning-after pill in itself IS NOT a form of contraception. It should only be used as a backup, not as the solution. There are safer and cheaper options when teaching kids about safe sex.[/quote]

    I realise that my generation aren't supposed to know anything about sex, (it having been invented well after we were past our teens), but we were taught that condoms were prophylactics and NOT an effective form of birth control. Could the lack of knowledge of this have something to do with the current explosion in juvenile pregnancies and subsequent terminations?

    2BM
     
  11. Indeed. There are behavioural issues, if a fallback is provided then there is less incentive to use appropriate barrier methods in the first instance, but if the fallback isn't provided then there is an increased risk that accidents happen; split condoms, etc.

    There is no easy solution to the bahavioural issue, there has to be a balance of options offered.

    Of course I'd agree that the safest method for avoiding STDs, when one is sexually active, remains a barrier but it has to be recognised that participation in monogamous or gated entry polyamorous relationships do reduce the risk of contracting an STD significantly. That's probably a bit much to expect in a school environment though.
     
  12. Material I've read suggests it is usually due to a mistaken belief that as treatment is available, say for AIDS, that means it's "safe". What they do not realise is the impact the disease will have upon them and the limitations of the medications themselves. In others, such as the bug chasers, it looks more like insanity. Finally there is that strong tendency to pretend that these diseases happen to other people! When AIDS first emerged and the churches defined it as devine retribution, apparently most heterosexuals thought they couldn't be infected by the HIV virus.
     

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