Salute Question

pompeyexpat

War Hero
From BRd 1834 - Raise the right hand smartly, by the shortest route, the palm of the hand being inclined slightly downwards, so that the eyes on glancing up can see the inside of the palm, the thumb and fingers being close together, elbow in line with the shoulder, hand and forearm in line, fingers touching the rim of the cap over the right eye
salute.jpg
Also from BRd 1834 - The Salute - History

A salute is in fact, the normal greeting between comrades in arms, and is an essential part of discipline. The salute with the hand, the presenting of arms and the salute with the sword, were methods by which the person paying a compliment could show the person to whom that compliment was being paid that no offence was meant. They are all gestures, symbolic of loyalty and trust. The Naval Hand salute is made with the palm of the hand inclined downwards, unlike the hand salutes of the Royal Marines, the Army and the Royal Air Force who all salute with the palm of the hand facing forward. The reason for this is believed to originate from the days of sail, when sailors climbed the rigging of ships and the palms of their hands became covered in rope burns and tar from the rigging. Admirals of the day did not like their sailors showing dirty hands to them when saluting so the hand was inclined downwards to hide the palm from view. The Naval Salute of Nelsons time was a ‘touch of the forelock’. Officers and men removed or touched their hats when in the presence of superiors. The present hand salute was introduced in 1890 and either hand could be used.
 

Sumo

War Hero
From BRd 1834 - Raise the right hand smartly, by the shortest route, the palm of the hand being inclined slightly downwards, so that the eyes on glancing up can see the inside of the palm, the thumb and fingers being close together, elbow in line with the shoulder, hand and forearm in line, fingers touching the rim of the cap over the right eye
View attachment 58332
Also from BRd 1834 - The Salute - History

A salute is in fact, the normal greeting between comrades in arms, and is an essential part of discipline. The salute with the hand, the presenting of arms and the salute with the sword, were methods by which the person paying a compliment could show the person to whom that compliment was being paid that no offence was meant. They are all gestures, symbolic of loyalty and trust. The Naval Hand salute is made with the palm of the hand inclined downwards, unlike the hand salutes of the Royal Marines, the Army and the Royal Air Force who all salute with the palm of the hand facing forward. The reason for this is believed to originate from the days of sail, when sailors climbed the rigging of ships and the palms of their hands became covered in rope burns and tar from the rigging. Admirals of the day did not like their sailors showing dirty hands to them when saluting so the hand was inclined downwards to hide the palm from view. The Naval Salute of Nelsons time was a ‘touch of the forelock’. Officers and men removed or touched their hats when in the presence of superiors. The present hand salute was introduced in 1890 and either hand could be used.
Thats a new one on me, any current serving fancy trying the left handed salute?
I was aware of the forlock touching and was told that was how it developed, and the other services were saying I am not armed. didn't know it was because the Senior service worked for a living.
 

Ballistic

War Hero
The present hand salute was introduced in 1890 and either hand could be used.
... or both :D

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D

Deleted 108407

Guest
Correct. Some officers like to give a little flick of the hand instead of the regulation shortest way down, all very American.
What a farce obsequious saluting is. The RN is not too bad notwithstanding brain-dead RPO's
My early service was on Defiance in Plymouth, A Sikh officer was doing something to do with mines and torpedoes and we went ashore in uniform on a few occasions.
My Sikh friend loved it and would salute until the cows came home. I thought then, and still do, that it's pretentious nonsense.
 
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