Russian 'killed UK diver' in 1956

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by watch_and_shoot, Nov 16, 2007.

Welcome to the Navy Net aka Rum Ration

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial RN website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. A former Russian frogman has claimed that he killed British diver Cdr Lionel "Buster" Crabb, who disappeared while spying on a Soviet warship in 1956

    LINK
     
  2. wet_blobby

    wet_blobby War Hero Moderator

    I can't see him fitting a mine in pompey harbour. Having a recce yes.
     
  3. Why would a Royal Navy diver be planting a mine on a soviet warship in 1956?

    Sounds like someone wanting to clear their conscience but very aware of their governments view on people who tell all even nowadays.

    RIP Buster
     
  4. I agree mate. A CTR of the underside of the ship makes sense, but attaching a mine? In enemy territory maybe, but not in Portsmouith Harbour.

    Also see: THIS

    AND THIS

    Edited to add: The documents all talk about an Intelligence operation and spying - not a sabotage mission, which contradicts he story of him attaching a mine.
     
  5. A naval version of the General Sikorsky assasination perhaps?
     
  6. I've got the Crabbe files on the RNA 10 Area website.

    Careful, it's a 81Mb .pdf. [​IMG]

    Runs to 93 pages.

    Download link.

    Other documents available on the (under construction) downloads page.

    More to follow.

    James
     
  7. More likely removing one.
    Sounds a bit James Bondish to me.
     
  8. Well mate, it was an operation being run by MI6 :thumright:
     
  9. I remember reading about this in a book about the SBS, apparently all that was found of Mr Crabbe was an arm which was washed ashore a few days later.

    ~Vesper
     
  10. The head that was washed up in Chichester harbour years ago and thought to be Crabbs......... was it ever DNA'd?
     
  11. BTW, I went aboard that cruiser in '56 when they had an 'open day'
     
  12. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    It's a fascinating story, the old Buster one, without a doubt very "Boy's Own" stuff- divers, espionage, WWII links, propulsion & propellors, headless torsos, you name it.

    I remember reading about it before I joined in 1981 & making a mental note not to become a Diver of the sub-aqua variety.
     
  13. Any diver doing a ships bottom search /survey on a vessel that hasn't been tagged out for divers needs to be very acquanted with hull fittings especially the sea water circ inlets.

    Brave man anyway --another story of derring -do .

    :nemo: :nemo:
     
  14. There is an excellent film about his WW2 exploits in Gib. I can't remember its name but has an excellent under-water knife fighting scene versus the Italians and a great performance by Sid James as a CPO.

    Well worth watching.
     
  15. From what I remember, this was an MI 6 operation called on the spur of the movement, because they was wanted a look at the hull fittings of a SVERDLOV. (The only previous visit of the type to UK was at the 1953 Fleet Review, whereas this time, ORDZHONIKIDZE was alongside.) Rumour has it that he was captured by Ivan divers, taken aboard and waltzed back to Russia. There are stories that he stayed and trained Spetsnatz swimmers, and several books have shown photos alleging that this was "Crabski", but nobody on either side in the know would pass comment. Doubt if we'll ever know the truthon this one.
     
  16. The Film in question is The Silent Enemy
    cheers

    G
     
  17. He was played (very well) by Lawrence Harvey. Sid James as the Chief was typical Sid James without the dirty laugh. It's shown on Film 4 or the History Channel on SKY quite regularly.
     
  18. The more interesting guy to have been interviewed would have been Cdr J Brooks, RN DSO* (deceased), who was Crabb's attendant diver on the Ordzhonokidze recce. MI6 were certainly up to some very strange things at that period and the events surrounding Brooks later on are almost as intreaguing as those of Crabb.
     

Share This Page