Router compatibility G & N

Discussion in 'Bloody Computers' started by hookyh, Nov 30, 2009.

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  1. Hi All!

    I've got an Orange Livebox which runs off 802.11G, which for wireless signal is frankly pants! (The range wont extend much past outside the room.

    My question is this: If I buy a Belkin N router will this solve the problem and more importantly will it be compatible with the Livebox? Does one replace the other, or should I wire them together?

    Can anyone help please?

    Cheers!!
     
  2. You lost me after "Hi all!"

    Try soldering the transverse gimble to the hotchen sprocket and see where that gets you.
     
  3. Don't ever do that or you will de-magnetise the scrinson adaptor!
     
  4. It depends on which phase-flux de-intensifier that you are using. Blue ones are good to go, but be very wary of slightly reddish or pusser's grey ones as the transmoglifiers in them are rubbish.
     
  5. The wireless N router will completely replace the LiveBox, which won't be a problem if you are only using the livebox for the internet. I'm not sure if this will cause issues with the streaming radio and "free second line", but it could well do.

    If you don't use those, no worries. If you do, it is possible to wire the two routers together.

    What I would say before you go doing this is: you still might get a rubbish signal strength. Is your house old with thick walls? Do you have a massive amount of metal (fridge, mirrors, cooker etc) between the wireless router and the other room? If so, wireless N may not solve your problems.

    A good solution for houses such as the one described in the previous paragraph is to use an electrical circuit local area network. Something like this:

    http://www.devolo.co.uk/consumer/mi.../datasheet-microlink-adsl-modem-router-en.pdf

    It utilises the wires delivering electricity to your appliances as a network, so anywhere you have a wall socket, you can connect your laptop to the internet (in your home). This works quite well, but is effected by poor latency. Latency is only really a problem if you need to play online shooting games or the like.

    Your final option, as has already been stipulated, is to re-route the thermaltranscouple through the prewired dongle ensuring that the resonant frequencies of the lateral and planar transmitters are never orthogonal.
     
  6. PMSL. I wish I'd thought of that.
     
  7. Thanks all!

    Got the answer I wanted and as usual Matelots didn't let me down on the humour front. HAPPY DAYS!
     

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