Retention

Manny

Badgeman
In the AFPR report this year it reported that 70% of the TA fail to get to the 3 year point (which I assume is means that 70% leave before they get to the trained strength).

Therefore the numbers published about the TA in round numbers, means that at least 70% are under training. I think the number for the RNR is lower.

The AFPR report also stated that the TA did not consider the value of the bounty was significant contributor to rentention.

So questions for everyone out there, who is in the RNR or recently left.

Is bounty useful for rentention?
What does/did keep you in the RNR?
What could the RN do, to retain you in the RNR?
 

Bisley

War Hero
from AFPRB

4.19 Serious manning shortfalls existed across the Reserve Forces at 1 May 2006: Royal NavyReserves (RNR) had a 23 per cent shortfall; Royal Marine Reserves (RMR) 26 per cent;Territorial Army (TA) 11 per cent; and Royal Auxiliary Air Force (RAuxAF) 40 per cent.

more importantly how long can any of the reserve forces last with such a loss of manpower?
 

trehorn

War Hero
Manny said:
In the AFPR report this year it reported that 70% of the TA fail to get to the 3 year point (which I assume is means that 70% leave before they get to the trained strength).

Therefore the numbers published about the TA in round numbers, means that at least 70% are under training. I think the number for the RNR is lower.

The AFPR report also stated that the TA did not consider the value of the bounty was significant contributor to rentention.

So questions for everyone out there, who is in the RNR or recently left.

Is bounty useful for rentention?
What does/did keep you in the RNR?
What could the RN do, to retain you in the RNR?

Bounty is very useful, however if you dont stay in long enough to reap the full bounty (4 or 5 yrs) then you probably wouldnt miss it.

The people and the experiences it offers you which you wouldnt get in civvy street.

Sort my bloody pay out!

I think that alot of new entries see the recruitment presentation and it entices them in. Despite being told that it will be at lest a couple of years before they can get to sea they still hope and pray for the full experience and get a little fed up the longer it takes.

I think if they arranged more weekends for the new entries to attend within their first few months then this would encourage them to persivere. They hear about all the fun that the time served matlots have on weekends and deployments and they want to join in and experience them too.
Help them see the bigger picture that we keep telling them about and they will stay. Also get them through the entry process quicker. It takes too bloody long!
 

veryparttimer

Midshipman
I have argued before that bounty is not necessarily the most important thing, it has to be the experience. You can do many exciting things that civvies can't and get paid for them, which is fantastic. Retention fails when, as Trehorn points out, it takes too long to get trained up or get to branch, or advanced once in branch. Not sure how this can improve given the current spate of cancellations and reduction in training budget... If there was anyway of taking NEs on a weekend at sea then this would also help

IMHO I would love to see more stuff done in unit: we have a river but no fit for purpose boats, a bloody great cruiser nearby that could be used for SPO training and decent presentation rooms. Seems a waste to me!
 

trehorn

War Hero
We dont have the equipment and until recently we lacked the leadership. We now have a PO who isvery keen to get things moving and hopefully our training from here on should improve. We have no river, boats etc etc but hopefully things are starting to move forward.

I'm not saying they're planning on moving the Leeds/Liverpool canal to pass round our way, or even give us one of them redundant T42's up Farham creek but with a keen instructor in front of you its a hell of alot easier.
 
Having read many of the posts on the RNR and avoided posting so far here is my twopence worth.

My time in the RNR was the early sixties and retention was not a problem, neither was recruiting. Perhaps my experience shows why this was the case then.

I joined at 16 as a JME and left at 18.5 to go to the RN. In that time I had been given a steady course of training at drill nights, spent many weekends working on the sweeper doing maintenance and thus getting practical traning, had been to see for weekends several times, and done 2 2 week cruises to Gibraltar.

Now it would appear that in the time I spent in the RNR most new recruits will probably not get to sea at all, many seem to have difficulty getting weekend training and even drill night training seems sporadic. There seems to be an element of lack of purpose in every thing with many expressing uncertainty of what their role is and what value they are to the RN.

Now my perception of todays reality may be wrong, and in fact I hope some one can tell me I am wrong, but perhaps the way ahead is one one hand to get new recruits to sea much earlier, to ensure branch stuctures are well known and understood and that training is regular meaningfull and available. Yes the days of having a divisional warship the size of a CMS are over but surely there is a need for a wider availability of tenders for the RNR and for people to get to sea in general.
 

FlagWagger

GCM
Book Reviewer
Maxi_77 said:
... but perhaps the way ahead is one one hand to get new recruits to sea much earlier, to ensure branch stuctures are well known and understood and that training is regular meaningfull and available. Yes the days of having a divisional warship the size of a CMS are over but surely there is a need for a wider availability of tenders for the RNR and for people to get to sea in general.

Maxi_77, I think your retirment from the RN is a sad loss - with perception as clear as this, there's a 1* job at West Battery waiting for you!!!!!
 
FlagWagger said:
Maxi_77 said:
... but perhaps the way ahead is one one hand to get new recruits to sea much earlier, to ensure branch stuctures are well known and understood and that training is regular meaningfull and available. Yes the days of having a divisional warship the size of a CMS are over but surely there is a need for a wider availability of tenders for the RNR and for people to get to sea in general.

Maxi_77, I think your retirment from the RN is a sad loss - with perception as clear as this, there's a 1* job at West Battery waiting for you!!!!!

I'd rather you had said I was wrong, but as I am now well past the retirement age for even 1* I think you will have tolok elsewhere for a saviour, mind you if they were say to offer me a 2 year contract with a nice fat gratuity at the end I might be prepared to consider.
 
By the sound of things perhaps the RNR should merge with the MVS! With the MVS when I was in it, following the disbandment of the RNXS, I spent more time at sea in 12 months than I had ever done in my entire 3 years with the RNXS (admittedly as a trainee Comms Rating). Not RN vessels of course, but yachting to learn basic seamanship and living together, team work etc., and weekend and week long training trips with the Marine Society (as adults, though we were treated like teenagers!!!). That was how I managed, through not securing a jet spray properly to the fire hose, to lose a heavy lump of brass in the drink off Ramsgate! :oops: (It was the plop sound on splash-down that made me feel so dejected!)
 

M1113

Midshipman
I totally agree with maxi 77. Yet this simple appreciation is not readily apparent to our lords and masters, or perhaps it is and they are not prepared to admit it. Where are the leaders who will stand up for the RNR?
Previously the sea was a great leveller and sorted the men/ladies from the boy/girls. Has this been replaced by spin and power point wars? In this modern RNR has the needs of the few gained greater credance than the needs of the many? Does the system re inforce selfishness and self promotion over team work and responsibility?
 
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