Raising the drinking age to 21

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by Hawkeye, Aug 15, 2007.

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  1. Yes

    100.0%
  2. No

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. I am a Chav so I don't give a Shit

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Is it only me or has somebody got it wrong ?
    When I was younger and in the mob I, like many others got smashed, shitfaced out of my ferkin tree on many occasions in fact more than I care to mention.
    Call it binge drinking or anything else but I never lost sight of respect for others or their property.
    The problem does not lie with the drink as most politicians and police would blame in my humble opinion the blame lies with the parents who have failed to educate their offspring with good basic family values.
    In short ferking Chavs
     
  2. Got P!ssed many times, and just burbled a lot and wanted to get back onboard for a sleep.

    Trouble now is that they get all punchy and want to take on the world. What ever happend to the Pleasent drunk
     
  3. Those youths that do get drunk and cause damage will continue to do so regardless, if they can get their hands on White Lightening at 15 now, raising the age to 21 will not improve things in the slightest.

    Hawkeye, I think that you are entirely right in saying that we currently have a parenting problem amongst many families in the UK, with parents who are either unable or more likely unwilling to take responsibility for their children, meanwhile always looking for an excuse as to why their little sprog is not to blame.

    It is going to take a serious change in mentality, and a return for the respect of the community before the current problem of yobs can be sorted.

    Furthermore why should thousands of current 18, 19 and 20 year olds who can handle their drink and do not go out every week getting plastered and finding trouble, suffer because some parents have failed massively?
     
  4. Raising the drinking age will not change things one atom.
    Excessive binge drinking has been a symptom of northern european culture for years. In Shakespears Hamlet, the lead character murders his father whilst drunk. 'There is something rotten in the state of Denmark' is talking of the drunkeness normal at the time.
    Drunkeness nowadays is probably less problematic than it has ever been. In the early years of the last century drunken pupils of Eton school regularly rampaged through the town; thus it is not a class thing(Chavs to me have never been distinguised by so called social class).
    As for a drunken matelots doing no hurt or damage in days of yore, well I think that is not the case; it is just that because we were young and daft ourselves we didn't see the hurt caused.
     
  5. FlagWagger

    FlagWagger Book Reviewer

    I'm over here, ashleep in the corner <hic> :)
     
  6. in the politicians and other 'do gooders' who want to blame somebody else! "as long as it's not them!!!"

    But hang on raise it to 21, don't you 'come of age' at 18? doesn't that mean something these days? like they can vote, not going to vote for the people who take away their right to get 'plastered' are they? :w00t:
     
  7. Yeah but the damage done was in places off of that list they always put up of areas to avoid due to being a problem area..../off to the photocopier...always turns out to be the best places to run ashore (with mates aplenty of course..lol)
     
  8. In my younger days?

    In Guz five sqid pissed on the old cider, enough money left fish & chips, no hassle just wanted your pit.

    :thumright: :thumright: :thumright:
     
  9. Sorry Sussex but I don't agree with your post are you saying that because I was young and daft and was drunk I committed acts of violence and damage but could not see what I was doing ? don't think so matey .
    Can't remember murdering my father or to that matter anybody else.
    When I was drunk I still knew right from wrong and the value of a human life.
     
  10. OP Hawkeye has it correct as has Potential Ocifer
    If 12 year olds can get alchol now they will still get it if the age is raised

    It is lack of parenting or single parent families

    Back in days of yore, yes as a matelot lots of drinking, but when drunk
    still had respect,
    Yes there were orphans then, they were brought up with discipline
    not by single mothers, who really just want the money and the next
    drink (most ie:-not , widows, seperated by service/work people)
    The rest came from a two parent home and were brought up If the father was a drunkard the mother took charge

    Up until the seventies there was no choice, it was abortion or adoption
    it was a shameful disgrace to be a single parent (other than the above widow etc) and off course there was no support monies from the state
    for every sprog you drop we will house you and give you £61 drinks money, We got nothing for the first child and 50p pw for second

    Only way to go now is fines and nines to the guardian, with no quarter taken, and non of the "you can not take any money from them as it is state money given by law to provide sustinance" from the do gooders
     
  11. There is a "rift" between generations now that was not apparent when I was in my teens. Yes, we had our differences, but we also had discipline at home and at school (sometimes rather too much!)
    My wife and myself were introduced to "strong drink" by our families in a gradual way. We accompanied our parents, all done up to the nines, to the British Legion on a Saturday evening, were allowed to drink alcohol in small quantities under supervision, and used to have what we considered to be a wonderful time. Walking back home giggling, with the grownups in similar mode, was quite acceptable. We also learned to sing all the "old" songs with adults, and were accepted as part of their company.
    When we married, neither yet 21, we had our reception in the Legion amidst all of our friends who had taught us to drink within our capabilities and to enjoy it.
    That cohesion has now gone. The music and enjoyment that I and my peers enjoyed is now no longer understood or tolerated by the younger generation, and the reverse is also true.
    Moderate social drinking started to die when pianos were replaced by juke boxes, and the increasingly loud electronic racket that passes for musical entertainment nowadays even prohibits conversation.
    There is very little else to do now in most pubs, but drink.

    2BM
     
  12. It is notjust the lack of parental influence for goo it is also down to Mr Plod who no longer bothers to arrest drunks, rather he uses police cars to take them home. When I was young if I got fall down drunk I would be arrested and appear in police court the next working day, if I did to often I would have gone to jail.

    The police have the answer i their own hands the £80 I've been a naughty boy tickets, just round them up and take them to the cash machines or gettheir parents to come and ransome the little darlings. If your night out costs you an extra £80 every time you will soon behave more sensibly, equally for the youngsters costing their parents £80 a shot will soon change parental attitudes.

    Asever we don't need new laws just the one we already have enforced.
     
  13. Most comments refer to the family as the probable cause of excessive teenage alcohol abuse with lack of guidance and supervision , spot on imo .The family unit has gone it seems where previously dad went to work and mum was always ' there ' on the home front providing all the essential elements of ' real ' family life . While not suggesting a return to the ' good old days ' I believe the loss of the ' team ' spirit in the family has created a sense of dis-unity . What's the point of staying home if there's nobody there . Sad but the way society is developing unfortunately and in the process law and order suffers . The answer possibly lies in national leadership and role models , something many countries seem to be lacking. One of the most disturbing features of the times I believe is the violence towards the most vulnerable , the very young and the elderly . The loss of respect is frightening and the violence and cruelty sickening . Sad for those who experienced a much more orderly childhood and youth . I would like to feel safe again when out and about . I even lock my car doors now when just going to the shops . Increasing the legal age for drinking alcohol will certainly not solve the problem but maybe setting an example would reverse the decline in behaviour . Just a thought .
     
  14. I've sat and watched the police stand and watch a fight outside a pub for a few mins before breaking it up round these parts, they have given up I think. So many go out now just to get off their faces that me and my mates stay out of our local town centre and just relax in a quiet back street pub. Only problem is they are vanishing which is sad. I reckon attitudes to drink/each other need to change. not, the drinking age. When I lived in Germany you could drink at 16 and they didn't have the drinking culture we have.
     
  15. And there's the rub, Safewalrus. Scapegoats have always been needed to shift the attention of the mob from those who really cause these problems, including the mob itself, egged on by the media with its ever short-term, profits related agendum. The rot started with Thatcher's infamous speech about 'freedom of the individual is absolute', a misquotation of Kierkegaard, and her claim that individual autonomy, amongst other things, must supplant the 'dead hand of the State' in order to encourage an enterprise, risk taking, spirit. Then there was her ridiculing of the teaching of history in schools, the rubbishing of philosophy and her outright promotion of the conservative evangelical Christian agenda, with their literal but selective interpretation of scripture: the same that teaches individuals should practice their beliefs even at the expense of the family... oh, but that was just Jesus speaking there :roll: whilst at the same time bemoaning the decline in "family values". It's ironic that Thatcherism exacerbated the problem with an economic policy that undermined families by promoting long working hours, economic hardship (which has been shown for several generations, to lead to the erosion of the family: poverty and money are very corrosive), economic and political emasculation of the working classes whilst rewarding greed and those who place socioeconomic individualism before the needs of the wider community. We are reaping the harvest of those years!

    End of rant.... awaiting incoming.

    PS: In my opinion, if someone is old enough to fight for his/her country, then they're old enough to drink, smoke (in moderation) and vote.
     
  16. What these morons need is a dammed good thrashing, bring back the birch.
     
  17. I think we should lower the ae to 16, demystify the whole aspect of booze.

    Educate them, hell, educate us!!
     
  18. Always a civvy wrote:

    And there's the rub, Safewalrus. Scapegoats have always been needed to shift the attention of the mob from those who really cause these problems, including the mob itself, egged on by the media with its ever short-term, profits related agendum. The rot started with Thatcher's infamous speech about 'freedom of the individual is absolute', a misquotation of Kierkegaard, and her claim that individual autonomy, amongst other things, must supplant the 'dead hand of the State' in order to encourage an enterprise, risk taking, spirit. Then there was her ridiculing of the teaching of history in schools, the rubbishing of philosophy and her outright promotion of the conservative evangelical Christian agenda, with their literal but selective interpretation of scripture: the same that teaches individuals should practice their beliefs even at the expense of the family... oh, but that was just Jesus speaking there Rolling Eyes whilst at the same time bemoaning the decline in "family values". It's ironic that Thatcherism exacerbated the problem with an economic policy that undermined families by promoting long working hours, economic hardship (which has been shown for several generations, to lead to the erosion of the family: poverty and money are very corrosive), economic and political emasculation of the working classes whilst rewarding greed and those who place socioeconomic individualism before the needs of the wider community. We are reaping the harvest of those years!

    End of rant.... awaiting incoming.

    PS: In my opinion, if someone is old enough to fight for his/her country, then they're old enough to drink, smoke (in moderation) and vote.

    "There is no such thing as society, only the individual" I paraphrase, and stand to be corrected. But I think we can in fact trace the current problems back to that one statement by Thatcher..

    Made me wince then and still does today some considerable time on
     
  19. Allways a Civvie and Pinch I agree that Thatcher did not help the current situation but as for the blame directly on her is not credible.

    More and more of the people in Britain are looking on the state to regulate their whole lives, ban this, ban that if its not acceptable, what happened to people using common sense and values to sort things out.

    The nanny state that is, is making society not have to make difficult choices.

    I don't give a fig if its not cool to be seen out with your parents or to socialise with older friends of your parents but if you look abroad where the family culture is preserved and see generations going out, having a good time and respectful of each other and society then something is wrong here.
    The parents should take back the responsibility if your going to have kids then teach them properly.
     
  20. I'll raise your Thatcher and play a Harold Wilson, his government laid the foundations for much of the social unrest that we have now, they were the ones who said you couldn't punish the poor for being criminals because it wasn't their fault, they were the ones who destroyed the discipline in our schools, Maggie just pinched the milk. No I put the blame firmly and squarely at Harold and his fellow travellers like Two Left Feet etc etc, the only decent one amongst them was George Brown, mainly as he did nothing through being under the influence most of the time.
     

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