RAF Typhoon aircraft exercise in UAE

#1
Ministry of Defence said:
This has been the first time that aircraft, engineers and pilots from the squadron, normally based at RAF Leuchars, have deployed together on the Advanced Tactical Leadership Course (ATLC), which runs each year at Al Dhafra Air Base.
Wing Commander Mike Baulkwill, Officer Commanding 6 Squadron, said:
We have been sent out here to conduct this multinational exercise that looks at large scale air operations involving many aircraft.
The exercise has been run over a number of weeks, giving the pilots, ground crew and support staff an opportunity to work alongside other nations. The squadron have been running air interdiction missions, self-escort missions and offensive and defensive counter air missions as part of the exercise. This has required the pilots and aircraft to be quick and reactive in a multi-role platform in all types of operational scenarios.
The exercise has been conducted in 2 parts - one wave of flying per day in support of the ATLC missions and one following wave each day where the pilots can fly alongside multinational aircraft to conduct further training.
Wing Commander Baulkwill added:
We have seen the ground crew and pilots from 6 Squadron lead and operate in a very different environment. Everybody at every rank is learning something from this exercise. We are learning to operate fully combat capable aircraft in a hot and dry environment which is very different to conditions at RAF Leuchars in the UK.
Senior Aircraftman Sam Norry, an Aircraft Maintenance Mechanic on 6 Squadron, said:
This is my first detachment and it has been much harder work out here. There are a lot more elements to contend with - temperatures alone are incredible, you have to drink a lot more water. Not only that, on the engineering side of things, you don’t have that instant support that you have in the UK - there are fewer people to work on the aircraft so you really have to work together and work hard to get the jobs done.

An RAF Typhoon from 6 Squadron at Al Dhafra Air Base [Picture: Crown Copyright/MOD 2013]To summarise the squadron’s support to the ATLC, Wing Commander Baulkwill said:
We have been operating huge missions with other nations, sometimes operating an air picture involving 60 aircraft with simulated high threat missions. It has been incredibly hard work for all of the pilots and the ground crew to support this.
We have found ourselves pushed hard, and the Typhoon aircraft has performed exceptionally well.
The systems that it has on board are second-to-none and we have seen the benefit of that - it has been impressive to say the least.


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CrashCrew

Lantern Swinger
#5
They did a great job on shafting the FAA and your branch in particular.

Firstly we can’t afford NOT to have strong naval forces. An inability to defend our interests and the control the sea will be far more costly and damaging to the UK economy in the long-term. Approximately £6 billion for their construction seems like a lot of money but in defence terms this is modest, especially when they will have a very long service life. (Great value for money compared to the £23 billion cost of a real white-elephant; the RAF Typhoon programme). They are assets which could potentially serve the country for 40-50 years. Their construction is providing around 10,000 jobs across the UK and maintaining the industrial & shipbuilding base the RN needs. Sadly to many politicians the programme is just a politically convenient a job-creation scheme and its survival is only down to this. (On arrival at the Treasury Chancellor George Osbourne demonstrated total ignorance/contempt by saying he wished “we could cancel the damn things”).
 

clonmel

Lantern Swinger
#6
They did a great job on shafting the FAA and your branch in particular.

Firstly we can’t afford NOT to have strong naval forces. An inability to defend our interests and the control the sea will be far more costly and damaging to the UK economy in the long-term. Approximately £6 billion for their construction seems like a lot of money but in defence terms this is modest, especially when they will have a very long service life. (Great value for money compared to the £23 billion cost of a real white-elephant; the RAF Typhoon programme). They are assets which could potentially serve the country for 40-50 years. Their construction is providing around 10,000 jobs across the UK and maintaining the industrial & shipbuilding base the RN needs. Sadly to many politicians the programme is just a politically convenient a job-creation scheme and its survival is only down to this. (On arrival at the Treasury Chancellor George Osbourne demonstrated total ignorance/contempt by saying he wished “we could cancel the damn things”).
God Almighty
 
#7
They did a great job on shafting the FAA and your branch in particular.
Approximately £6 billion for their construction seems like a lot of money but in defence terms this is modest, especially when they will have a very long service life. (Great value for money compared to the £23 billion cost of a real white-elephant; the RAF Typhoon programme). They are assets which could potentially serve the country for 40-50 years.

Until of course some jilalibad high on weed decides to strap some explosives onto a skiff and then drive towards an aircraft carrier laden with even more expensive F-35's....Yay ROE!
 
#8
Until of course some jilalibad high on weed decides to strap some explosives onto a skiff and then drive towards an aircraft carrier laden with even more expensive F-35's....Yay ROE!
You think a skiff with explosives will sink 60'000 tons of aircraft carrier fittes with CIWS, that's a big skiff!!
 
#11
Why my face? I'd be surprised as I was a submariner unless the bad guys have resurrected the WW2 kamikaze boats they had.
Well any other part of your anatomy would just be weird. Anyhoo my point was more like that of the USS Samuel.B.Roberts in that even if something small hit the aircraft carrier, it would cause it to be U/S and cost a lot of money to repair, and we wouldnt have a full size fast jet carrier. Though I guess the Gov would see that as a job for the British labour force...swings and roundabouts
 
G

guestm

Guest
#12
Well any other part of your anatomy would just be weird. Anyhoo my point was more like that of the USS Samuel.B.Roberts in that even if something small hit the aircraft carrier, it would cause it to be U/S and cost a lot of money to repair, and we wouldnt have a full size fast jet carrier. Though I guess the Gov would see that as a job for the British labour force...swings and roundabouts
What a ******* bizarre piece of random speculation.
 
#13
Well any other part of your anatomy would just be weird. Anyhoo my point was more like that of the USS Samuel.B.Roberts in that even if something small hit the aircraft carrier, it would cause it to be U/S and cost a lot of money to repair, and we wouldnt have a full size fast jet carrier. Though I guess the Gov would see that as a job for the British labour force...swings and roundabouts
So you equate a frigate hitting a mine to a carrier having a smally boat with explosives going off receiving comparable damage?

Stick to COD.
 
#14
So you equate a frigate hitting a mine to a carrier having a smally boat with explosives going off receiving comparable damage?

Stick to COD.
I wasn't comparing the two effects directly but in the eyes of the government they may as well be the same... no?

I'm more of a farmyard simulator guy myself...
 
#15
I wasn't comparing the two effects directly but in the eyes of the government they may as well be the same... no?
I'm more of a farmyard simulator guy myself...[/QUOTE]

Possibly, as it will be classed as an attack on the UK and those farmyard films are banned under UK law.
 

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