Quick question on asthma?

Discussion in 'Royal Naval Reserve (RNR)' started by Spinach, Jun 30, 2009.

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  1. Sorry to ask this its prob been asked amillion times but can someone just tell me what the deal is on asthma. Iv heard alot of diff things of some peaple saying it depends on the individual and stuff. Can u join the RNR iv u have mild asthma or have used an inhaler recently because of smoking? even iv u can complete all physical fitness tests?

    Also what about RFA and asthma..?
  2. If you smoke so much you need an inhaler then you must be mental. That would preclude entry.

    For help with the rest, check out the Health & Ftiness or Newbie fora. This topic has been covered ad infinitum and I'm sick repeating it all.
  3. Jesus wept asthma, inhalers and a smoker. Don't let the door hit your ass on the way out.
  4. If you have used an inhaler in the last 4 years then its a no no I'm affraid, no matter what the reason.

    We've recently had a lassy in who had a chest infection two years ago and was prescribed an inhaler temporarily. She didn't even use it but it was a straight no from the doc.
  5. Ok - The official line for the cheap seats!!!

    Applicants must be sympton and treatment free for four years and will still be subject to a full medical and a pre-joining fitness test (1.5 miles on a treadmill for sailors), whereby if you can get over these obstacles you may be accepted for training. Fitness is and has been cranked up at HMS Raleigh in recent times, so anyone slipping through the net could well find themselves being found out. Having spoken to medics from the sickbay at raleigh in recent months this has become one of the prime reasons for discharge.
    I can (and do) fully appreciate that asthmatics want to live as full lives as possible and have the same opportunities as everyone else, indeed I have great respect for anyone who is prepared to take up a career which includes a large amount of physical endeavour (at least in the short to medium term) and who suffers from such a potentially debilitating condition. That being said the service has a duty of care to it's employees and as such can take no chances with these things. Imagine suffering an unexpected attack during a firefight in Afghanistan or on deck in rough weather. Not good!

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