Question regarding Psoriasis

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Kal_Stu, Apr 13, 2011.

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  1. Hi everyone, I know this has been asked lots of times but I didn't find the answer to my questions using the search bar..

    I know Psoriasis is a bar to entry however recently I have got a small patch (no bigger than a small circular Elastoplast) Caused by stress (I believe). I have passed my medical and this is the first time I have ever had psoriasis. I have been to the doctors and have got some cream to clear it up. However I was wondering will this prevent me from joining as I know the rules are quite strict regarding it?

    Thanks for any help

    Kal
     
  2. Read this little lot it's taken from a sticky in the newbies forum called Frequently Asked Questions-Medical Standards, of particular interest to you is the enboldened passage on skin disorders.
    • Please note that the AFCO staff are not medically qualified and that the decision regarding medical suitability for enlistment is determined by selection medical staff.

      The aim of this thread, probably about to become longer :thumbleft: , is to clarify the medical standards laid down to all applicants joining the Armed Forces. In general terms if an individual fails to meet the medical standard for a specific trade in one of the services, they will most likely do likewise in the equivalent trade in one of the other arms of the Services.

      Despite individual experience expressed to the contrary, the medical standards for entry are different for those currently serving personnel who may develop a condition “in service†which precludes entry, but does not always stop them continuing to serve after they have joined.

      Rather than enter into the semantics or “fairness†of the standards outlined below, those wishing to complain about it would be better off directing their complaint at the medical authorities who set the standard – they get paid a lot more than me anyway. The following is an extract from the AFCO Form 5, Application Form Information and Guidance Booklet that is given to every applicant (which invariably remain unread!). Any spelling errors are mine, my apologies:

      AFCO FORM 5 Revised Mar 07

      APPLICATION FORM INFORMATION & GUIDANCE NOTES

      MEDICAL

      Fit to Serve. The Armed Forces require anyone who enters to be medically fit to serve world-wide.

      New entrants to the Armed Forces undergo Intensive training which is physically demanding and mentally taxing, therefore the Service medical authorities have to be made aware of your medical history. Your application will be rejected if you fail to meet the minimum acceptable medical standard for entry. Your medical history is confidential and is not disclosed to those not authorised to hold this information.

      The following initial medical examinations will take place for the:

      (1) Royal Navy and Royal Air Force. It will take place locally as arranged by the Armed Forces Careers Office.

      (2) Army. It will take place in an Army Development and Selection Centre. For that reason the Army additionally uses a detailed questionnaire to be completed by your Doctor as part of the eligibility process in order to help avoid unnecessary travel away from home.

      (3) Reserve Forces. Under single service arrangements as notified by the recruiting personnel.

      Unsuitable conditions.

      The conditions in the table on below and overleaf make a person permanently unsuitable for entry into the Services.
      Please also note:

      (1) Height and weight Height should be within normal limits for the recruit’s age and weight should be in proportion to height This table below and overleaf is not exhaustive and is for general guidance only. Many conditions that are compatible with civilian employment and sport may be considered incompatible with military service. If you have a medical condition that is not mentioned below, or you are unclear about the impact of your medical
      history, you should seek further advice from the AFCO staff. Please note that the AFCO staff are not medically qualified and that the decision regarding medical suitability for enlistment is determined by selection medical staff.

      Eye Disorders

      Eye disease e.g. glaucoma, keratoconus, retinitis pigmentosa. Double vision.
      Visual field defects. Corneal grafts or recurrent corneal ulcers. Cataract or cataract surgery. Detached retina. Vision only in one eye. Squint surgery in the previous 6 months. Laser eye surgery in the previous 12 months.

      Ear Nose & Throat disorders

      Ongoing ear, nose, throat or sinus disease. Deafness. Presence of grommets.
      Current perforated ear drum. Certain surgical procedures.

      Heart and Cardiovascular disorders

      Heart disease. Certain congenital heart conditions e.g. repair of tetralogy of Fallot, coarctation of the aorta. Certain heart valve abnormalities. High blood pressure. Reynaud’s disease.

      Respiratory disorders

      Asthma, wheeze or asthma symptoms or treatment within the past 4 years. Lung
      disease Including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis.
      Active tuberculosis.

      Abdominal and digestive disorders including diet

      Ongoing abdominal, digestive or liver disease. Crohn's disease. Ulcerative colitis.
      Loss of spleen (splenectomy). Chronic hepatitis. Untreated hernia. Requirement for specific dietary restriction.

      Neurological disorders

      Ongoing nervous system disease. Epilepsy or more than one Seizure/fit after
      the age of 5 (although Benign Rolandic epilepsy is acceptable). Single seizure/fit
      within the last 5 years. Multiple sclerosis. Complications following head injury.
      Hydrocephalus (with or without shunt). Severe or recurrent headache (including
      migraine).

      Skin disorders

      Chronic eczema or dermatitis. &ere psoriasis. Severe acne.
      would be better off directing their complaint at the medical authorities who set the standard
      .

      Please note that the AFCO staff are not medically qualified and that the decision regarding medical suitability for enlistment is determined by selection medical staff.


    If you're not in and you've got it, you should report it to your CA bod.
    Training at Raleigh could be just as stressful (snigger.) for you as your current situation. Any flare up there of an existing medical problem that you've neglected to mention prior to joining could mean a sudden return to civvydom with nil chance of return.
     
  3. Thank you. I will ring the AfCO as soon as I can and let them know.
     
  4. Honesty is the best policy.
     

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