Question on RNR Satellite Units

Purple_twiglet

War Hero
Moderator
#1
Okay, to help me with understanding some research for a piece of work I'm doing, could anyone tell me the following:

When did concept of satelite units emerge?
Why do they exist and why not commission them as HMS units?
What is their intended function versus normal RNR units?
What do they deliver that an RNR unit does not?
Are they worth keeping?
 

IFHP

Midshipman
#2
1. Don't know
2/3. To give the parent unit a bigger reach / footprint. For instance when HMS Dalriada was in Greenock they had a satellite in Glasgow City Centre to capture more of the population.
4. They don't deliver anything that an RNR unit doesn't, it is merely an extension of the parent unit to conduct training etc.
5. Depends. Using the Dalriada example they have now moved to Glasgow so the satellite unit is no longer required. I think President still has one outside of London and to the South. I think it all depends on location of parent unit and centre of populace and proximity to another RNR unit.

Hope that helps.....
 
#3
Okay, to help me with understanding some research for a piece of work I'm doing, could anyone tell me the following:

When did concept of satelite units emerge?
Calder Division was opened in 2001 and I believe that other units around the country were opened at the same time. Some units were successful and have since thrived. Other units didn't and have since closed.


Why do they exist and why not commission them as HMS units?
I believe the main reason is because it was realised that decisions to close RNR units in nearby areas was a mistake (Leaving Yorkshire - the largest county in the UK without one.....). Satalite (or Tender units as they are sometimes called) were a way of enlarging the coverage of the RNR at a vastly reduced cost.
HMS units require perminant staff and are provided with things such as cars and minibuses. tender units don't recieve these and have to make do. Sometimes there are issues to overcome between the parent unit and tender unit but both should realise that they need each other - especially when the parent unit adds the tender unit figures to their books to make them look better - and pockets the extra cash for subsidising a tender.

What is their intended function versus normal RNR units?
The function is the same although the very limited funding and support means that the staff have to work consideably harder to deliver relevent training.


What do they deliver that an RNR unit does not?
Nothing. They are part of the RNR so they are responsible or delivering the role of the RNR in their locality.

Are they worth keeping?
In my opinion - without a doubt. Visit a tender unit and you will see for yourself. The original tender units which are still in existance are - in many cases - better attended and providing better training than some HMS units.

Tender units bring out the best of what the RNR is about (although i must admit it's a rather disapointing way of going about it). Because Tender units do not have perminant staff much more responsibility falls on the part timers. The lack of equipment provided and the often limited facilities provided means that the tenders improvise training, often to very good effect. The pride and cameradarie found in the tender units is fantastic - i would compare it with working in small ships in the RN. They tend to be a tight nit bunch who stick together.
Hope the above answers your questions.
 
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