PTSD in soldiers linked to heart attacks in later years

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by Always_a_Civvy, Jan 10, 2007.

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  1. There is an item in today's Herald (10 January 2007) highlighting recent, as yet uncorroborated research, which suggests there may be a link between soldiers suffering from PTSD and an increased risk of myocardial infarction later in life. These data would appear to correspond with other studies which correlate stress with premature mortality from heart disease.

    The research, carried out by the Harvard School of Public Health, also suggests an increased susceptability to arthritis and psoriasis.

    Previous research has suggested that stress, which necessarily includes PTSD, compromises autoimmune function.
     
  2. Always,stress has always been a major contributory factor to MI's.Beats me why its taken them so long to suss this out!!!
     
  3. Compensation? No it could never be that, that's just SO cynical of me! :roll:
     
  4. Reinstate'theTot' to help counteract stress I say - it's much cheaper than compo!
     
  5. And welcome back the inevitable return of alcoholism, gastric and duodenal ulcers, ad nauseam ad infinitum. Oh, and bring back the monthly issue of WD and HO Wills' floor sweepings and we can really go back to the old ways!
     
  6. I remember listening to an MOD librarian telling us about the porn she selected for soldiers abroad at least 20 years ago. Providing a range to suit all tastes should meet the needs of the diversity regulations (well some of them :) ) Would this help too?
     
  7. It would be interesting to actually read the paper in full. There are a lot of potential confounders - how many of the PTSD patients smoked, consumed excess alcohol, had a bad diet and didn't exercise (all much better established risk factors for cardiac events). I wouldn't hang my hat on this research yet!
     

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